49 research outputs found

    An experimental investigation of wall boundary layer transition Reynolds numbers in an expansion tube

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    Experimental measurements of boundary-layer transition in an expansion-tube test-gas flow are presented along with radial distributions of pitot pressure. An integral method for calculating constant Reynolds number lines for an expansion-tube flow is introduced. Comparison of experimental data and constant Reynolds number calculations has shown that for given conditions, wall boundary-layer transition occurs at a constant Reynolds number in an expansion-tube flow. Operating conditions in the expansion tube were chosen so that the effects of test-gas nonequilibrium on boundary-layer transition could be studied

    Solution of a large hydrodynamic problem using the STAR-100 computer

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    A representative hydrodynamics problem, the shock initiated flow over a flat plate, was used for exploring data organizations and program structures needed to exploit the STAR-100 vector processing computer. A brief description of the problem is followed by a discussion of how each portion of the computational process was vectorized. Finally, timings of different portions of the program are compared with equivalent operations on serial machines. The speed up of the STAR-100 over the CDC 6600 program is shown to increase as the problem size increases. All computations were carried out on a CDC 6600 and a CDC STAR 100, with code written in FORTRAN for the 6600 and in STAR FORTRAN for the STAR 100

    A finite-difference analysis of the nozzle starting process in an expansion tunnel

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    A suitable finite-difference method for computing the quasi-one-dimensional unsteady flow in an expansion tunnel nozzle was identified. The difference equations are presented along with the appropriate stability limits. A parametric study of the starting process in an expansion tunnel nozzle is made, and acceptable operating conditions were determined

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

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    New improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were developed. The curve fits are for p = p(e,rho), a = a(e,rho), T = T(e,rho), s = s(e,rho), T = T(p,rho), h = h(p,rho), rho = rho(p,s), e = e(p,s) and a = a(p,s). These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes if real-gas effects are desired. The curve fits were constructed using Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits appearing in NASA CR-2470. These improvements were due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th to 100 amagats (rho/rho sub 0)

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

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    New, improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air have been developed. The curve fits are for pressure, speed of sound, temperature, entropy, enthalpy, density, and internal energy. These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing computational fluid dynamics codes if real gas effects are desired. The curve fits are constructed from Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits. These improvements are due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25 000 K and densities from 10 to the -7 to 10 to the 3d power amagats

    User's guide for vectorized code EQUIL for calculating equilibrium chemistry on Control Data STAR-100 computer

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    A vectorized code, EQUIL, was developed for calculating the equilibrium chemistry of a reacting gas mixture on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. The code provides species mole fractions, mass fractions, and thermodynamic and transport properties of the mixture for given temperature, pressure, and elemental mass fractions. The code is set up for the electrons H, He, C, O, N system of elements. In all, 24 chemical species are included

    Calculation of inviscid flow over shuttle-like vehicles at high angles of attack and comparisons with experimental data

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    A computer code HALIS, designed to compute the three dimensional flow about shuttle like configurations at angles of attack greater than 25 deg, is described. Results from HALIS are compared where possible with an existing flow field code; such comparisons show excellent agreement. Also, HALIS results are compared with experimental pressure distributions on shuttle models over a wide range of angle of attack. These comparisons are excellent. It is demonstrated that the HALIS code can incorporate equilibrium air chemistry in flow field computations

    Shuttle flight pressure instrumentation: Experience and lessons for the future

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    Flight data obtained from the Space Transportation System orbiter entries are processed and analyzed to assess the accuracy and performance of the Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) pressure measurement system. Selected pressure measurements are compared with available wind tunnel and computational data and are further used to perform air data analyses using the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) computation technique. The results are compared to air data from other sources. These comparisons isolate and demonstrate the effects of the various limitations of the DFI pressure measurement system. The effects of these limitations on orbiter performance analyses are addressed, and instrumentation modifications are recommended to improve the accuracy of similar fight data systems in the future

    Experimental and Computational Analysis of Shuttle Orbiter Hypersonic Trim Anomaly

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    During the high-Mach-number, high-altitude portion of the first entry of the Shuttle Orbiter, the vehicle exhibited a nose-up pitching moment relative to preflight prediction of approximately Delta Cm = 0.03. This trim anomaly has been postulated to be due to compressibility, viscous, and/or real-gas (lowered specific heat ratio gamma) effects on basic body pitching moment, body-flap effectiveness, or both. In order to assess the relative contribution of each of these effects, an experimental study was undertaken to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and ratio of specific heats. Complementary computational solutions were obtained for wind-tunnel and flight conditions. The primary cause of the anomaly was determined to be lower pressures on the aft windward surface of the Orbiter than deduced from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests with ideal- or near-ideal-gas test flow. The lower pressure levels are a result of the lowering of the flowfield gamma due to high-temperature effects. This phenomenon was accurately simulated in a hypersonic wind tunnel using a heavy gas, which provided a lower, gamma, and was correctly predicted by Navier-Stokes computations using nonequilibrium chemistry

    Computational/Experimental Aeroheating Predictions for X-33

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    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate calculations from an "engineering" code and laminar calculations from a "benchmark" Navier-Stokes code are compared with experimental wind-tunnel data obtained on several candidate configurations for the X-33 Phase 2 flight vehicle. The experimental data were obtained at a Mach number of 6 and a freestream Reynolds number ranging from 1 to 8 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Comparisons are presented along the windward symmetry plane and in a circumferential direction around the body at several axial stations at angles of attack from 20 to 40 deg. The experimental results include both laminar and turbulent flow. For the highest angle of attack some of the measured heating data exhibited a "non-laminar" behavior which caused the heating to increase above the laminar level long before "classical" transition to turbulent flow was observed. This trend was not observed at the lower angles of attack. When the flow was laminar, both codes predicted the heating along the windward symmetry plane reasonably well but under-predicted the heating in the chine region. When the flow was turbulent the LATCH code accurately predicted the measured heating rates. Both codes were used to calculate heating rates over the X-33 vehicle at the peak heating point on the design trajectory and they were found to be in very good agreement over most of the vehicle windward surface
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