1,823 research outputs found

    Vorhizomeid: Nodes of Community Services Connecting Albany, NY

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    The contention is to reposition terrain vague into the urban fabric recreating a continuum of the urban system while attempting to detract neither from the scale of the infrastructural system, nor that of the human body. Terrain vague muse be approached in a different manner than that of the traditional urban city. Establishing community through terrain vague should be done by measure of the forces, flows, and rhythms of space

    Discovery of Resistance-Reversing Agents in Antibiotic Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae from Natural Product Libraries

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    Objective: The objective of this exploratory research is to discover compounds, particularly from natural products, that inhibit ESBL, KPC, and NDM-1 mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in the Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Methods: This objective will be accomplished utilizing a high-volume bioassay testing natural product samples from the National Center for Natural Products Research. This assay tests samples against 6 different strains of bacteria known to express β-lactamases in the presence and absence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the test antibiotic. By structuring the assay in this way, differentiation may be made between the inherent antibacterial activity of samples and the synergistic effects between the sample and the antibiotic. Optical density (OD) readings will be used to determine bacterial growth or the lack thereof. Samples showing pronounced activity only in the presence of the antibiotics will be considered active and will be tested in a checkerboard assay to confirm activity. Results: Of over 5,000 samples tested, 35 samples showed synergistic activity, giving a hit rate of 0.7%. Of these 35, the most promising three hits were tested in follow-up checkerboard assays. These three samples all demonstrated synergistic effects with fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) of <0.5. Of the samples tested in the checkerboard assays, one was a plant extract, one was a pure compound, and one was a fungal soil isolate obtained from the National Cancer Institute. Conclusions: This study showed the benefits of using a high-volume screen to test samples against resistant bacterial strains. Continued research in this field could prove to be beneficial to the discovery of new drugs for clinically relevant therapeutic applications

    The effects of composting period and mineral amendments on a 50:50 blend of pine and hardwood bark

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    This research was designed to refine a composting process for a 50:50 blend of pine and hardwood bark to be used as a container growing medium. The first experiment studied the effects of composting period and mineral amendments on the preparation of blended pine and hardwood bark media, and the succeeding experiments studied plant growth in the media prepared in the first experiment. Equal volumes of pine bark and hardwood bark were composted in partitioned windrows. Daily heat production during composting was monitored and used to determine targeted endpoint temperatures. Targeted endpoint temperatures were 50°C and 40°C. Mineral amendments tested were S, KNO3, and MgSO4. For comparison with composted media, four media currently being used in the nursery industry were also tested. Physical and chemical properties of all media were examined. Composting to 50°C took only six weeks while nine weeks were required to reach 40°C. Shorter composting to 50°C resulted in 7% less shrinkage and a greater percent air capacity. Composting to 40°C resulted in a greater amount of small particles, percent total pore space, and percent water holding capacity. Mineral amendments had little or no effect on physical properties of composted media. The pH and electrical conductivity of composted media were not influenced by endpoint temperature or mineral amendments. Physical and chemical properties of composted media were intermediate of comparison media. Rhododendron cv. \u27Red Ruffles\u27, Photinia x fraseri, and Juniperus conferta cv. \u27Blue Pacific\u27 were grown in the previously described media. Photinia and juniper grew equally well in media composted to 50°C and 40°C. Azaleas grew best in media composted to 40°C. Mineral amendments had little or no effect on plant growth. Plants grew as well or better in composted media than in comparison media. Since six weeks of composting to a 50°C endpoint and elimination of S, KNO3, and MgSO4 frequently produced better growth than other media tested, it appeared to be an excellent medium for container nursery production

    Enhancing Farm Profitability through Portfolio Analysis: The Case of Spatial Rice Variety Selection

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    This study applies portfolio theory to rice varietal selection decisions to find profit maximizing and risk minimizing outcomes. Results based on data from six counties in the Arkansas Delta for the period 1999–2006 suggest that sowing a portfolio of rice varieties could have increased profits from 3 to 26% (depending on the location) for rice producers in the Arkansas Delta. The major implication of this research is that data and statistical tools are available for rice producers to improve the choice of rice varieties to plant each year in specific locations. Specifically, there are large potential gains from combining varieties that are characterized by inverse yield responses to growing conditions such as drought, pest infestation, or the presence of a specific disease.optimal variety selection, portfolio analysis, rice, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Risk and Uncertainty, G11, Q15, Q12,

    Enhancing Farm Profitability through Portfolio Analysis: The Case of Spatial Rice Variety Selection.

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    The objectives of this paper is to use the large depth of existing literature on portfolio theory and apply it to rice varietal selection for 6 counties in the Arkansas Delta. Results based on 1999-2006 data suggests that combining available varieties using portfolio theory could have increased profits from 3 to 26% (dependent on location) in the Arkansas Delta. The major implication of this research is that data and statistical tools are available to improve the choice of rice varieties to plant each year in specific locations within Arkansas. Specifically, there are large potential gains from combining varieties that are characterized by inverse yield responses to growing conditions such as drought, pest infestation, or the presence of a specific disease.Rice, portfolio analysis, optimal variety selection, risk analysis., Production Economics, D81, Q16, Q12,
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