86 research outputs found

    Online peer assessment: helping to facilitate learning through participation

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    The focus of this paper is on the combination of enquiry-based learning, information literacy and e-learning and how they are embedded in an online peer assessment exercise. What it shall present is a structure and strategy that aids student learning in the short and long-term. Ninety eight students completed a questionnaire before and after a three-week online peer assessment exercise during a first year undergraduate research and study skills module. The results demonstrate that a significant number of students valued the design of the exercise and the benefits it can have on their future learning and development. The paper concludes by suggesting that new and innovative ways of assessment are needed to keep engaging students and develop their learning in different ways

    Information literacy education in the UK: reflections on perspectives and practical approaches of curricular integration

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    This paper has two main aims, to present the current position of information literacy education in UK-based academic institutions and to propose a strategy that ensures the integration of this phenomenon in learning and teaching institutional practices. The first part of the paper offers an insight into the perceptions of information literacy by exploring four distinct perspectives, including the institutional angle and the views associated with faculty staff, library staff and students. What transpires from the findings is that information literacy from an institutional perspective is dominated by the need to measure information skills within the context of information as a discipline in its own right. Another issue that is raised by the data points to a great deal of misinformation regarding information literacy, and that, as a result, a clear marketing strategy must be adopted by information professionals to address the misconceptions held by faculty staff and students alike. We aim to address these points by drawing on recent scholarship and research in the field which demonstrates the validity of information literacy as a process for fostering independent learning. The second part of the paper explains how a Fellowship project has placed information literacy on the pedagogical agenda of the University of Staffordshire in the UK by promoting information literacy education as an integrated element of the curriculum

    Teaching, not telling: Proceedings of the 2nd UK Information Literacy and Summon Day: Summon, information literacy and ‘Step Up To HE’

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    This paper, originally presented by Eleanor Johnston as a Prezi, outlines how Staffordshire University's ‘Step Up To HE’ programme encourages students to become more effective critical thinkers in their studies

    The challenges of delivering a public library service using volunteers: a qualitative investigation examining key stakeholder experiences

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    This paper considers the findings of recent qualitative research, which examined volunteer use in public libraries, focussing on the perceptions of four groups of stakeholders (the library managers, front line staff, volunteers and library users) in the light of recent austerity measures in two English case study library authorities. A complex picture of public library service delivery exists, with a move from value-added volunteers supporting staff, to the replacement of paid staff with volunteers. This development challenges the previous positive relationships established by value-added volunteer use, and hints at an underlying societal misunderstanding of public libraries, which affects wider policy and practice. The paper examines the challenges of using volunteers to plug the gaps left by library closures and paid staff reductions, and identifies possible areas of good practice in what has become an increasingly hybrid model of public service delivery

    Health literacy, patient information and combating misinformation

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    In this chapter, we will explore definitions of health literacy in relation to individuals and wider society. We will examine which groups in society are more likely to be affected by low health literacy and describe how having low health literacy impacts on a person’s health and wellbeing and the services that support them. We will set out tools and techniques that can help people with low health literacy and promote health literacy in practice. Finally, we will outline the context for work by health library and knowledge specialists in promoting health literacy

    An investigation into Scottish teenagers’ information literacy and search skills

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    Introduction. This paper presents the results of a study investigating the information literacy and search skills of young people in Scotland. Method. The participants, secondary school pupils between the ages of 13 and 14 (n=57), completed two out of four different search tasks from the TREC HARD collection, for which the correct answers (i.e. relevant documents) were known. Their interactions with the search system were logged and information about their own perceptions of the task were collected through pre- and post-task questionnaires. Analysis. The log data from the search system was analysed using the R statistical software package to understand the performance and behaviour of the participants when conducting the search tasks. Findings. While we identified some evidence that information literacy and search skills were being employed, overall performance was low with participants often unable to produce successful queries and/or unable to identify relevant documents, even when some were present in the results. Despite assessing their own performance as being good, the pupils struggled to formulate good quality queries to assess documents for relevance, frequently selecting non-relevant sources. Conclusion. Search performance and ability to identify relevant information was generally poor, a fact that participants themselves were frequently unable to recognise. The results also suggest a reliance on complex search assistance tools (such as spell checking and query suggestions), which are common features of major search engines, but not of smaller systems, which pupils are also likely to have to use. Despite the pupils having been giving some information literacy training in the previous year, the results suggest that more needs to be done to help school pupils in searching for and assessing relevant source documents

    An information literacy teaching model for Vietnam’s schools

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    Purpose This study aims to identify the ways in which information literacy (IL) in- practice initiatives are framed for Vietnam’s upper secondary students and to suggest an appropriate IL teaching model for schools in the country. Design/methodology/approach The research employed a qualitative multiple case study approach, including two phases of data collection. The first phase gathered data from semi-structured student interviews. The second phase included semi-structured professional interviews and an analysis of documents. Findings The research found that time pressure, teaching method, resource issues, students’ awareness of IL and support from family are challenges for the development of IL programmes. These factors contribute to the development of an IL teaching model for Vietnam’s upper secondary schools. Research limitations/implications The focus of this study was limited to two schools in order to gain the depth of data needed to provide a holistic picture of the practice of IL teaching in Vietnam’s upper secondary schools. Practical implications This study could provide some guidance to the Ministry of Education and Training in the development of educational policies and initiatives through identifying the possible contributions of IL to Vietnam’s education system. Originality/value The study provides an understanding of the development of IL in the education system in transition, from a didactic to a constructivist approach

    Research Data Management (RDM) and the Evolving Identity of Academic Libraries and Librarians: A Literature Review

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    Academic libraries and their staff are increasingly involved in the Research Data Management (RDM) practices and processes in their universities. This article explores the impact that such initiatives have on the image and identity of academic libraries. This paper proposes that involvement in and leadership of RDM university practices has the potential to re-shape the library’s role, image, and identity within the university, and going forward, to contribute to the library’s continuing relevance to research communities. It also points to the need to develop librarians’ skills and competencies in RDM, and reflects on the dynamics associated with collaboration and competition in RDM. The article concludes with an agenda for future research

    Research and practice A critical reflection on approaches that underpin research into people’s information behaviour

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    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical discussion on the nature of research into people's information behaviour, and in particular the contribution of the phenomenological approach for the development of information solutions. Design/methodology/approach – The approach takes the form of a conceptual analysis drawing on the research literature and personal research experience. Findings – The paper brings to the foreground the relative value of different conceptual approaches and how these underpin and relate to the development of information solutions. Research limitations/implications – The paper, due to the breadth and complexity of the subject, serves to highlight key issues and bringing together ideas. Some topics deserve further explanation. However, this was beyond the scope of this paper. Practical implications – A conceptual framework is provided that indicates the value of the epistemic spectrum for information behaviour studies and provides support for action research and participative design. Social implications – Taking a phenomenological approach, and consequently either a first person approach and/or a highly participative approach to research, challenges the relationship between researcher and respondent. It also raises questions about why the authors conduct research and for whom it is intended. Originality/value – The paper makes explicit the underlying philosophical assumptions and how these ideas influence the way the authors conduct research; it highlights the significance of Cartesian dualism and indicates the significance of these assumptions for the development of information solutions. It supports the view that researchers and developers should be open to respondents leading the exploration of their needs

    Numerical simulation of electromagnetic coupling in explicitly meshed wiring looms and bundles

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    In this paper, the Unstructured Transmission Line Modelling (UTLM) method based on a tetrahedral mesh is applied to model the electromagnetic coupling into wire looms and bundles with multiple cores that are typical of an aircraft system, when they are exposed to plane wave illuminations. The impact on the electromagnetic coupling into wires of both bundle configuration and the positioning of the bundle relative to simple structures are investigated using the UTLM method with explicit meshing of the wires. The work not only confirms that UTLM method as a powerful tool for dealing with wire looms and bundles but provides invaluable information on the margins to be expected in key experimental waveform parameters such as peak amplitude and frequency response
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