1,138 research outputs found

    The CAITLIN Auralization System: Hierarchical Leitmotif Design as a Clue to Program Comprehension

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    Early experiments have suggested that program auralization can convey information about program structure [8]. Languages like Pascal contain classes of construct that are similar in nature allowing hierarchical classification of their features. This taxonomy can be reflected in the design of musical signatures which are used within the CAITLIN program auralization system. Experiments using these hierarchical leitmotifs indicate whether or not their similarities can be put to good use in communicating information about program structure and state

    Musical Program Auralisation: Empirical Studies

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    Program auralisation aims to communicate information about program state, data, and behaviour using audio. We have argued that music offers many advantages as a communication medium [1]. The CAITLIN system [4, 16, 17, 18] was constructed to provide auralisations within a formal structured musical framework. Pilot studies [4, 16] showed that programmers could infer program structure from auralisations alone. A study was conducted using twenty-two novice programmers to assess a) whether novices could understand the musical auralisations and b) whether the musical experience and knowledge of subjects affected their performance. The results show that novices could interpret the auralisations (with accuracy varying across different levels of abstraction) and that musical knowledge had no significant effect on performance. A second experiment was conducted with another twenty-two novice programmers to study the effects of musical program auralisation on debugging tasks. The experiment aimed to determine whether auralisations would lead to higher bug detection rates. The results indicate that, in certain circumstances, musical auralisations can be used to help locate bugs in programs and that musical skill does not affect the ability to make use of the auralisations. In addition, it the experiment showed that subjective workload increased when the musical auralisations were used

    CAITLIN: A Musical Program Auralisation Tool to Assist Novice Programmers with Debugging

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    Early experiments have suggested that program auralization can convey information about program structure [5]. Languages like Pascal contain classes of construct that are similar in nature allowing hierarchical classification of their features. This taxonomy can be reflected in the design of musical signatures which are used within the CAITLIN program auralization system. Experiments using these hierarchical leitmotifs should (see note in EXPERIMENT section) indicate that their similarities can be put to good use in communicating information about program structure and state

    Green operators for low regularity spacetimes

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    In this paper we define and construct advanced and retarded Green operators for the wave operator on spacetimes with low regularity. In order to do so we require that the spacetime satisfies the condition of generalised hyperbolicity which is equivalent to well- posedness of the classical inhomogeneous problem with zero initial data where weak solutions are properly supported. Moreover, we provide an explicit formula for the kernel of the Green operators in terms of an arbitrary eigenbasis of H 1 and a suitable Green matrix that solves a system of second order ODEs

    Generalised hyperbolicity in spacetimes with string-like singularities

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    In this paper we present well-posedness results of the wave equation in H1H^{1} for spacetimes that contain string-like singularities. These results extend a framework able to characterise gravitational singularities as obstruction to the dynamics of test fields rather than point particles. In particular, we discuss spacetimes with cosmic strings and the relation of our results to the Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture.Comment: Accepted for publication in Classical and Quantum Gravit

    Music and Speech in Auditory Interfaces: When is One Mode More Appropriate Than the Other?

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    A number of experiments, which have been carried out using non-speech auditory interfaces, are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. The possible advantages of using non-speech audio media such as music are discussed – richness of the representations possible, the aesthetic appeal, and the possibilities of such interfaces being able to handle abstraction and consistency across the interface

    Media Culture 2020: collaborative teaching and blended learning using social media and cloud-based technologies

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    The Media Culture 2020 project was considered to be a great success by all the partners, academics and especially the students who took part. It is a true example of an intercultural, multidisciplinary, blended learning experience in higher education that achieved it goals of breaking down classroom walls and bridging geographical distance and cultural barriers. The students with different skills, coming from different countries and cultures, interacting with other enlarges the possibilities of creativity, collaboration and quality work. The blend of both synchronous and asynchronous teaching methods fostered an open, blended learning environment, one that extended the traditional boundaries of the classroom in time and space. The interactive and decentralized nature of digital tools enabled staff and students to communicate and strengthen social ties, alongside participation in the production of new knowledge and media content. For students and lecturers, the implementation of social media and cloud platforms offered an innovative solution to both teaching and learning in a collaborative manner. By leveraging the interactive and decentralised capabilities of a range of technologies in an educational context, this model of digital scholarship facilitates an open and dynamic working environment. Blended teaching methods allow for expansive collaboration, whereby information and knowledge can be accessed and disseminated across a number of networked devices

    Hawking's singularity theorem for C1,1C^{1,1}-metrics

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    We provide a detailed proof of Hawking's singularity theorem in the regularity class C1,1C^{1,1}, i.e., for spacetime metrics possessing locally Lipschitz continuous first derivatives. The proof uses recent results in C1,1C^{1,1}-causality theory and is based on regularisation techniques adapted to the causal structure.Comment: 19 pages, LaTeX; v2: corrected Lemma 4.2; v3: typos corrected, final versio
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