12 research outputs found

    Stress Shielding in Cemented Hip Implants Assessed From Computed Tomography

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    Background: Aseptic loosening is the major cause of revisions for hip replacement. This mode of failure is often caused by stress shielding. Stress shielding in the femur occurs when some of the loads are taken by the prosthesis and shielded from going to the bone. There is little information regarding the stress shielding among cemented hip implants. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of stress shielding on the proximal femur with a femoral prosthesis. Methods: A patient had undergone open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) due to a comminuted reversed oblique fracture of the right intertrochanteric hip. ORIF had failed and was converted to bipolar hemiarthroplasty. CT scans were performed on both the right and left hips. Housefield units were determined by using the probe tool. By using equations formulated by Carter and Hays, Linde et al., various parameters such as apparent density, Young’s’ modulus and ultimate strength were calculated. The results were compared to that a native hip. Results: The hip with the cemented implant had a significant increase in the apparent density, Young’s modulus and ultimate strength, when compared to the left hip. In addition, it was found that the right hip had a higher strain energy density than that of the left. Interpretation: It has been concluded the most stress shielding occurred in the calcar region of the femur. The instances of stress shielding have been extensively reported for non-cemented or direct bone to implant constructs, this paper reports stress shielding in cemented implants supported by imaging data and biomechanical calculations carried out at the bone-cement-metal interface

    Primary Hemiarthroplasty for the Treatment of Basicervical Femoral Neck Fractures

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    Purpose Basicervical femoral neck fractures are uncommon injuries that occur at the extracapsular base of the femoral neck at its transition with the intertrochanteric line. Controversy remains in the orthopedic literature as to the optimal method of treatment for this fracture type given the inherent instability and greater rate of implant failure with traditional fixation constructs. The purpose of this study is to quantify the incidence and preferred treatment methods of basicervical hip fractures at a single, regional, Level 1 trauma center and to identify differences in postoperative complications between treatment options. Methods The present study is a retrospective case series from a single regional health network, including 316 patients with hip fractures. Basicervical femoral neck fractures were identified. Reoperation rates within 90 days, implant failures or nonunions, postoperative ambulation distances and range of motion, and discharge dispositions were compared across patients grouped by surgical treatment with either cephalomedullary nail, sliding hip screw, or hemiarthroplasty (HA). Results Basicervical femoral neck fractures represented 6.6% of this study population. The cephalomedullary nail group demonstrated rates of implant failure and return to the operating room within 90 days of 40% (4/10) and 20% (2/10), respectively. No patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty experienced a failure of fixation or return to the operating room. Conclusions This study suggests a much lower rate of fixation failure or need for reoperation with hemiarthroplasty treatment compared to cephalomedullary nail construct for basicervical femoral neck fractures and may be an underutilized treatment method for this fracture type. The promising results seen with this case series should encourage further investigation into HA as a primary treatment for these uncommon, yet challenging, fractures

    Correction to: Cluster identification, selection, and description in Cluster randomized crossover trials: the PREP-IT trials

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    An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article

    Patient and stakeholder engagement learnings: PREP-IT as a case study

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    Stress Shielding in Cemented Hip Implants Assessed From Computed Tomography

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    Background: Aseptic loosening is the major cause of revisions for hip replacement. This mode of failure is often caused by stress shielding. Stress shielding in the femur occurs when some of the loads are taken by the prosthesis and shielded from going to the bone. There is little information regarding the stress shielding among cemented hip implants. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of stress shielding on the proximal femur with a femoral prosthesis. Methods: A patient had undergone open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) due to a comminuted reversed oblique fracture of the right intertrochanteric hip. ORIF had failed and was converted to bipolar hemiarthroplasty. CT scans were performed on both the right and left hips. Housefield units were determined by using the probe tool. By using equations formulated by Carter and Hays, Linde et al., various parameters such as apparent density, Young’s’ modulus and ultimate strength were calculated. The results were compared to that a native hip. Results: The hip with the cemented implant had a significant increase in the apparent density, Young’s modulus and ultimate strength, when compared to the left hip. In addition, it was found that the right hip had a higher strain energy density than that of the left. Interpretation: It has been concluded the most stress shielding occurred in the calcar region of the femur. The instances of stress shielding have been extensively reported for non-cemented or direct bone to implant constructs, this paper reports stress shielding in cemented implants supported by imaging data and biomechanical calculations carried out at the bone-cement-metal interface

    The Popularity of Outcome Measures Used in Shoulder Arthroplasty Literature

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    Introduction Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are frequently utilized within orthopaedics to determine the extent of patient disease and the efficacy of surgical treatments. Shoulder arthroplasty is a common treatment option for a range of pathologies; however, substantial variety exists regarding the instruments used within the published literature, limiting their quality and generalizability. The purpose of the present systematic review is to evaluate the overall number and frequency of outcome measures used in all clinical studies evaluating outcomes following shoulder arthroplasty. Methods This systematic review was performed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies that assessed patient reported outcomes following total shoulder arthroplasty, reverse shoulder arthroplasty, and shoulder hemiarthroplasty were obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases. For each manuscript, the journal, authors, region of origin, level of evidence, and subject/pathology were recorded. The frequency of each reported outcome measure and category. Associations between study characteristics and measure categories were tested using Poisson regression with robust error variance. Results A total of 682 articles were included in the analysis, reporting 42 different PROs. The most popular tools were the Constant-Murley score (49.7%), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation Form (37.7%), and the Visual Analog Scale (34.3%). A generic outcome tool was used in 287 studies (42.1%), while 645 (94.6%) utilized a shoulder-specific measure and 49 (7.2%) used a disease-specific measure. The use of generic (p Conclusion Studies assessing patient outcomes following shoulder arthroplasty employ a large range of PRO measuring tools, many of which are non-validated. Furthermore, only a small percentage of studies utilize a combination of tools from different categories despite current recommendations. Consensus on validated and clinically-meaningful tools from multiple categories is necessary to increase the generalizability and applicability of published studies in shoulder arthroplasty literature. Level of Evidence

    Backout of Distal Interlocking Screws After Retrograde Femoral Nailing With a Novel Device: A Case Series

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    Objective: To report upon a series of patients who have experienced the backout of distal interlocking screws after retrograde femoral nailing with the DePuy Synthes RFN-Advanced Retrograde Femoral Nailing System (DePuy Synthes, Raynham, MA). Design: Retrospective case series. Patients: Twenty-seven skeletally mature patients with femoral shaft or distal femur fractures who underwent operative fixation with the DePuy Synthes RFN-Advanced Retrograde Femoral Nailing System with 8 patients subsequently experiencing backout of distal interlocking screws. Intervention: The study intervention included retrospective review of patient charts and radiographs. Main Outcome Measure: The incidence rate of distal interlocking screw backout. Results: Thirty percent of patients experienced the backout of at least 1 distal interlocking screw (mean: 1.625) after undergoing retrograde femoral nailing with the RFN-Advanced system. Thirteen total screws backed out postoperatively. Screw backout was identified an average of 61 days postoperatively (range: 30‚Äď139 days). All patients complained of implant prominence and pain along the medial or lateral aspect of the knee. Five patients elected to return to the operating room to remove the symptomatic implant. The oblique distal interlocking screws comprised 62% of screw backouts. Conclusions: Given the high incidence rate of this complication, the associated costs of reoperation, and patient discomfort, we believe that a further investigation into this implant complication is warranted. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence

    Backout of Distal Interlocking Screws After Retrograde Femoral Nailing With a Novel Device: A Case Series

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    Objective: To report upon a series of patients who have experienced the backout of distal interlocking screws after retrograde femoral nailing with the DePuy Synthes RFN-Advanced Retrograde Femoral Nailing System (DePuy Synthes, Raynham, MA). Design: Retrospective case series. Patients: Twenty-seven skeletally mature patients with femoral shaft or distal femur fractures who underwent operative fixation with the DePuy Synthes RFN-Advanced Retrograde Femoral Nailing System with 8 patients subsequently experiencing backout of distal interlocking screws. Intervention: The study intervention included retrospective review of patient charts and radiographs. Main Outcome Measure: The incidence rate of distal interlocking screw backout. Results: Thirty percent of patients experienced the backout of at least 1 distal interlocking screw (mean: 1.625) after undergoing retrograde femoral nailing with the RFN-Advanced system. Thirteen total screws backed out postoperatively. Screw backout was identified an average of 61 days postoperatively (range: 30‚Äď139 days). All patients complained of implant prominence and pain along the medial or lateral aspect of the knee. Five patients elected to return to the operating room to remove the symptomatic implant. The oblique distal interlocking screws comprised 62% of screw backouts. Conclusions: Given the high incidence rate of this complication, the associated costs of reoperation, and patient discomfort, we believe that a further investigation into this implant complication is warranted. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence

    Backout of Distal Interlocking Screws After Retrograde Femoral Nailing With a Novel Device: A Case Series

    No full text
    Objective: To report upon a series of patients who have experienced the backout of distal interlocking screws after retrograde femoral nailing with the DePuy Synthes RFN-Advanced Retrograde Femoral Nailing System (DePuy Synthes, Raynham, MA). Design: Retrospective case series. Patients: Twenty-seven skeletally mature patients with femoral shaft or distal femur fractures who underwent operative fixation with the DePuy Synthes RFN-Advanced Retrograde Femoral Nailing System with 8 patients subsequently experiencing backout of distal interlocking screws. Intervention: The study intervention included retrospective review of patient charts and radiographs. Main Outcome Measure: The incidence rate of distal interlocking screw backout. Results: Thirty percent of patients experienced the backout of at least 1 distal interlocking screw (mean: 1.625) after undergoing retrograde femoral nailing with the RFN-Advanced system. Thirteen total screws backed out postoperatively. Screw backout was identified an average of 61 days postoperatively (range: 30‚Äď139 days). All patients complained of implant prominence and pain along the medial or lateral aspect of the knee. Five patients elected to return to the operating room to remove the symptomatic implant. The oblique distal interlocking screws comprised 62% of screw backouts. Conclusions: Given the high incidence rate of this complication, the associated costs of reoperation, and patient discomfort, we believe that a further investigation into this implant complication is warranted. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence

    Accuracy of Self-Reported Opioid Use in Orthopaedic Trauma Patients

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    Purpose Opioids have long been a mainstay of treatment for pain in patients with orthopaedic injuries, but little is known about the accuracy of self-reported narcotic usage in orthopaedic trauma. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of self-reported opioid usage in orthopaedic trauma patients. Methods A retrospective review of all new patients presenting to the orthopaedic trauma clinic of a level 1 trauma centre with a chief complaint of recent orthopaedic-related injury over a 2-year time frame was conducted. Participants were administered a survey inquiring about narcotic usage within the prior 3 months. Responses were cross-referenced against a query of a statewide prescription drug monitoring program system. Results The study comprised 241 participants; 206 (85.5%) were accurate reporters, while 35 (14.5%) were inaccurate reporters. Significantly increased accuracy was associated with hospital admission prior to clinic visit (ő≤‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ‚ąí‚ÄČ1.33; Ōá2‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ10.68, P‚ÄČ\u3c‚ÄČ0.01; OR: 0.07, 95% CI 0.01‚Äď0.62). Decreased accuracy was associated with higher pre-visit total morphine equivalent dose (MED) (ő≤‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ0.002; Ōá2‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ11.30, P‚ÄČ\u3c‚ÄČ0.01), with accurate reporters having significantly lower pre-index visit MED levels compared to underreporters (89.2‚ÄȬĪ‚ÄČ208.7 mg vs. 249.6‚ÄȬĪ‚ÄČ509.3 mg; P‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ0.04). An Emergency Department (ED) visit prior to the index visit significantly predicted underreporting (ő≤‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ0.424; Ōá2‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ4.28, P‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ0.04; OR: 2.34, 95% CI 1.01‚Äď5.38). Conclusion This study suggests that most new patients presenting to an orthopaedic trauma clinic with acute injury will accurately report their narcotic usage within the preceding 3 months. Prior hospital admissions increased the likelihood of accurate reporting while higher MEDs or an ED visit prior to the initial visit increased the likelihood of underreporting
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