120 research outputs found

    Multimodal Pharmacological Analgesia in Pain Management

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    The knowledge of the pathophysiology of pain has gradually evolved in recent years, allowing the development of new management strategies, more specifically addressing single pain types and patient profiles. Despite these advancements, pain management still remains an open issue, given the limitations of single agent therapies, the potential abuse/misuse of opioids and the risk of adverse events. The advent of multimodal analgesic strategies paves the way for major improvements in pain management, combining increased efficacy with better tolerability and an opioid-sparing effect. The association of analgesics with different mechanisms of action represents a successful strategy for a wide range of pain conditions, minimizing side effects and taking advantage of the additive or synergistic actions of individual agents. Last but not least, the increasing availability of oral fixed-dose combinations of analgesics will offer further advantages over extemporaneous combinations, by increasing ease of administration and patient adherence to treatment

    Combination of Rehabilitative Therapy with Ultramicronized Palmitylethanolamide for Chronic Low Back Pain: An Observational Study

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    Chronic low ba,:k pain (LBP) caused by intervertebral disc herniation was reported in the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study to be the main reason for;zears lived wittL disability. It causes significant personal, social, and economic burdens. Many of those who suffer from LBP find convent:ional medica.l treatments to be unsatisfactory for treating their pain, so they are increasingl'g resorting tcr complementary and alternalive medicine (CAM) therapies. Given that thr: population ir; aging, there is an urgent need to characterize the combinations of complementary therapie:; that yield the best outcomes and treatments, even for prolonged periods. The multiple action of PEA in connbination with CAVI therapies may represent the multitarget approachr needed trc tackle the as-yet unsolved problem of chronic pain resistant to conventional therapie

    Ibuprofen Safety at the Golden Anniversary: Are all NSAIDs the Same? A Narrative Review

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    Ibuprofen first came to market about 50 years ago and rapidly moved to over-the-counter (OTC) sales. In April 2019, the National Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products (ANSM) of France issued a warning for NSAID uses by patients with infectious diseases based on an analysis of 20 years of real-world safety data on ibuprofen and ketoprofen. Nevertheless, ibuprofen remains a mainstay in the analgesic armamentarium and with numerous randomized clinical trials, head-to-head studies, and decades of clinical experience. The authors offer a review of the safety of ibuprofen and how it may differ from other NSAIDs. Ibuprofen is associated with certain well-known gastrointestinal adverse effects that are related to dose and patient population. Among nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), ibuprofen has a comparatively low risk of cardiovascular adverse effects. It has been associated with renal and hepatic adverse effects, which appear to depend on dose, concomitant medications, and patient population. The association of ibuprofen with infections is more complex in that it confers risk in some situations but benefits in others, the latter in cystic fibrosis. Emerging interest in the literature is providing evidence of the role of ibuprofen as a possible endocrine disrupter as well as its potential antiproliferative effects for cancer cells. Taken altogether, ibuprofen has a favorable safety profile and is an effective analgesic for many acute and chronic pain conditions, although it—like other NSAIDs—is not without risk. After 50 years, evidence is still emerging about ibuprofen and its unique safety profile among NSAIDs. The Rapid Service Fee was funded by Abbott Established Pharmaceuticals Division (EPD)

    Low Back Pain

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    Common Clinical Practice for Low Back Pain Treatment: A Modified Delphi Study

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    Low back pain (LBP) is a common reason for adults to seek medical care and is associated with important functional limitation and patient burden. Yet, heterogeneity in the causes and presentation of LBP and a lack of standardization in its management impede effective prevention and treatment

    Non-Pharmacological Management of Painful Peripheral Neuropathies: A Systematic Review.

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    Peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) is defined as the neuropathic pain that arises either acutely or in the chronic phase of a lesion or disease affecting the peripheral nervous system. PNP is associated with a remarkable disease burden, and there is an increasing demand for new therapies to be used in isolation or combination with currently available treatments. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence, derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assess non-pharmacological interventions for the treatment of PNP.After a systematic Medline search, we identified 18 papers eligible to be included.The currently best available evidence (level II of evidence) exist for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In particular, spinal cord stimulation as adjuvant to conventional medical treatment can be effectively used for the management of patients with refractory pain. Similarly, adjuvant repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex is effective in reducing the overall pain intensity, whereas adjuvant static magnetic field therapy can lead to a significant decrease in exercise-induced pain. Weaker evidence (level III of evidence) exists for the use of acupuncture as a monotherapy and neurofeedback, either as an add-on or a monotherapy approach, for treatment of painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy CONCLUSIONS: Future RCTs should be conducted to shed more light in the use of non-pharmacological approaches in patients with PNP

    Recommendations for the management of opioid-induced constipation - how to improve usability in clinical practice

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    INTRODUCTION: Opioid-induced constipation remains undertreated despite effective and safe treatment options exists. Previous guidelines have only been partially effective in improving management, possibly due to their complexity, and studies suggest that a simple setup of concise and behaviorally-orientated steps improves usability.AREAS COVERED: This article introduces the concept of opioid-induced constipation and provides an overview of existing guidelines in this field. We also propose simplified recommendations for managing opioid-induced constipation, derived from a synthesis of current guidelines and the principles of optimal guideline design theory.EXPERT OPINION: Despite standard treatment with laxatives and fluid intake in patients with opioid-induced constipation, escalation of treatment is often needed where μ-opioid receptor antagonists or newer medications such as lubiprostone, linaclotide, or prucalopride are used. Previous guidelines have not been used sufficiently and thus management of the condition is often insufficient. We therefore propose simplified recommendations to management, which we believe can come into broader use. It was validated in primary care for credibility, clarity, relevance, usability, and overall benefit. We believe that this initiative can lead to better management of the substantial proportion of patients suffering from side effects of opioids.</p
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