372 research outputs found

    The ETC : an all-sky monitor of celestial optical flashes

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    Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Physics, 1986.MICROFICHE COPY AVAILABLE IN ARCHIVES AND SCIENCEBibliography: leaves 165-168.by Roland Kraft Vanderspek.Ph.D

    TESS Discovery of an Ultra-short-period Planet around the Nearby M Dwarf LHS 3844

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    Data from the newly commissioned Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has revealed a "hot Earth" around LHS 3844, an M dwarf located 15 pc away. The planet has a radius of 1.303 ± 0.022 R⊕ and orbits the star every 11 hr. Although the existence of an atmosphere around such a strongly irradiated planet is questionable, the star is bright enough (I = 11.9, K = 9.1) for this possibility to be investigated with transit and occultation spectroscopy. The star's brightness and the planet's short period will also facilitate the measurement of the planet's mass through Doppler spectroscopy

    Searching for Gravitational-Wave Counterparts using the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

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    In 2017, the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors, in conjunction with electromagnetic (EM) astronomers, observed the first GW multi-messenger astrophysical event, the binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW170817. This marked the beginning of a new era in multi-messenger astrophysics. To discover further GW multi-messenger events, we explore the synergies between the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) and GW observations triggered by the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA Collaboration (LVK) detector network. TESS's extremely wide field of view of ~2300 deg^2 means that it could overlap with large swaths of GW localizations, which can often span hundreds of deg^2 or more. In this work, we use a recently developed transient detection pipeline to search TESS data collected during the LVK's third observing run, O3, for any EM counterparts. We find no obvious counterparts brighter than about 17th magnitude in the TESS bandpass. Additionally, we present end-to-end simulations of BNS mergers, including their detection in GWs and simulations of light curves, to identify TESS's kilonova discovery potential for the LVK's next observing run (O4). In the most optimistic case, TESS will observe up to one GW-found BNS merger counterpart per year. However, TESS may also find up to five kilonovae which did not trigger the LVK network, emphasizing that EM-triggered GW searches may play a key role in future kilonova detections. We also discuss how TESS can help place limits on EM emission from binary black hole mergers, and rapidly exclude large sky areas for poorly localized GW events.Comment: 16 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables. Submitted to AAS Journal

    TESS Discovery of an Ultra-short-period Planet around the Nearby M Dwarf LHS 3844

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    Data from the newly commissioned Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite has revealed a "hot Earth" around LHS 3844, an M dwarf located 15 pc away. The planet has a radius of 1.303 ± 0.022 R⊕ and orbits the star every 11 hr. Although the existence of an atmosphere around such a strongly irradiated planet is questionable, the star is bright enough (I = 11.9, K = 9.1) for this possibility to be investigated with transit and occultation spectroscopy. The star's brightness and the planet's short period will also facilitate the measurement of the planet's mass through Doppler spectroscopy

    Quick-Look Pipeline Light Curves for 5.7 Million Stars Observed Over the Second Year of TESS' First Extended Mission

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    We present High-Level Science Products (HLSPs) containing light curves from MIT's Quick-Look Pipeline (QLP) from the second year of TESS' first Extended Mission (Sectors 40 - 55; 2021 July - 2022 September). In total, 12.2 million per-sector light curves for 5.7 million unique stars were extracted from 10-minute cadence Full-Frame Images (FFIs) and are made available to the community. As in previous deliveries, QLP HLSPs include both raw and detrended flux time series for all observed stars brighter than TESS magnitude T = 13.5 mag. Starting in Sector 41, QLP also produces light curves for select fainter M dwarfs. QLP has provided the community with one of the largest sources of FFI-extracted light curves to date since the start of the TESS mission.Comment: 3 pages, 1 figur

    TESS Data Release Notes: Sector 18 DR25

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    This release note discusses the science data products produced by the Science Processing Operations Center at Ames Research Center from Sector 18 observations made with the TESS spacecraft and cameras as a means to document instrument performance and data characteristics

    TESS Data Release Notes: Sector 17, DR24

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    This release note discusses the science data products produced by the Science Processing Operations Center at Ames Research Center from Sector 17 observations made with the TESS spacecraft and cameras as a means to document instrument performance and data characteristics

    TESS Data Release Notes: Sector 20, DR27

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    This release note discusses the science data products produced by the Science Processing Operations Center at Ames Research Center from Sector 20 observations made with the TESS spacecraft and cameras as a means to document instrument performance and data characteristics
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