46 research outputs found

    Using digital storytelling as a methodology for the introduction of socially responsible graphic design in a University Bachelor of Computer Graphic Design Programme

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    This paper case studies the pedagogical methodology for a digital storytelling project involving final semester Bachelor of Computer Graphic Design students and students from a community based charitable arts trust. A young artist is paired with a senior tertiary graphic design student to create digital narratives that attempt to remain within the spirit of the original goals of the Digital Storytelling Movement. The project aims to introduce socially responsible graphic design to tertiary computer graphic design students and foundation arts students. Discussion of the learning outcomes of this project, including analysis of the results of the personal breakthroughs made by students as seen in their written accounts in project completion surveys are detailed

    Greater understanding of spacing needs for children’s eye movements during on-screen reading is required

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    This paper endeavors to consolidate current knowledge and empirical research concerning the use of typography for children’s on-screen reading. This paper is not intended as a full literature review, but attempts to raise awareness of the areas required for future investigation. This evaluation indicates a significant gap in the literature of children’s on-screen reading and proposes a need for further investigations in typographical spacing. These future studies need to objectively consider children’s eye movements and the effect of screen based text presentation on children’s comprehension

    Reviewing the understanding of the effects of spacing on children’s eye movements for on-screen reading

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    This paper endeavors to consolidate current knowledge and empirical research concerning the use of typography for children’s on-screen reading. This paper is not intended as a full literature review but attempts to raise awareness of the areas required for future investigation. This evaluation indicates a significant gap in the literature of children’s on-screen reading and proposes a need for further investigations in typographical spacing. These future studies need to objectively consider children’s eye movements and the effect of screen based text presentation on children’s comprehension

    Text spacing considerations for children’s on-screen reading

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    This investigation seeks to uncover the insights of three integral and inter-related participants in the creation and use of on-screen reading material for children’s learning. This is an effort to discover what factors are perceived to influence children’s comprehension. Through a design-analyse-refine methodology this researcher discusses a series of typographical considerations relating to space which bear further empirical investigation in the literature. This methodology involved discussion of ideas garnered from four experts. The results of each iteration of the experiment influenced further refinement of the ideas until suitable conclusions were able to be developed by the writer. Testing materials in this experiment adjusted variables for visual separation, including margins, separation of image and type, as well as line spacing, letter spacing and word spacing

    Using a categorisation structure to understand interaction in children’s books

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    Children’s books can vary greatly in the type of and depth of interaction that is required from the reader. The types of interaction demanded by different types of books can be explored using contrasting paradigms. Previously Timpany & Vanderschantz (2012) proposed a categorisation of interactive children’s books that used two continuums that took into consideration Physical Enhancement and Content Sequencing. This paper looks at those categorisations made by Timpany & Vanderschantz (2012) and considers how the multitude of formats addresses either the physical or intellectual aspects of children’s reading and how this then may be used to engage the reader. To do this, a database of 132 books was audited to assess the interactivity of these books against those categorisation systems. The range of books surveyed is discussed in terms of what methods are used to create the interaction within each of the interactivity levels and across types of books. Findings from this audit demonstrate interesting interactions between age, physical enhancement versus content sequencing, and the relationship of these to mechanisms for interactivity such as paper engineering, illustration and story structure. The majority of the books in the sample have no interactive qualities on one of the two-categorisation scales. Physically enhanced books were marginally more highly represented on the scale at higher levels of interactivity. Counter intuitively, the physically interactive pop up books were seen to fall predominantly in lower categories (1 or 2) for physical enhancement, while books requiring image search, an intellectual activity, were also predominantly in the lower categories (1 or 2) for content sequencing

    Learning outcome dependency on contemporary ICT in the New Zealand middle school classroom

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    Often studies of children's technology use in the classroom is internally focused and small scale. This study attempts a globalised exploratory overview of an entire New Zealand middle school to understand the technology usages across a range of curriculum and learning outcomes. Observations of the use of technology in the classroom during eight different lessons were conducted followed by structured-open-ended interviews. From our classroom observations and through teacher interviews, we have been able to identify three levels of the dependency of learning outcome on contemporary-ICT

    Sometimes the Internet reads the question wrong: children’s search strategies & difficulties

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    When children search for information on a given topic, how do they go about searching for and retrieving information? What can their information seeking strategies tell us about the development of search interfaces for children's digital libraries, search engines and information repositories? We interviewed New Zealand (NZ) school children to seek insights into how they are conducting information searches during their education

    A typographic case study: children's digital books in New Zealand primary schools

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    Increasingly children’s educational reading material is presented in a screen-based environment. This includes a range of interactive learning tools, interactive whiteboards, on-line standardized testing material, digital books including CD-ROMs and E-Books, as well as digital reference books such as encyclopedia and dictionary. With this increase in on-screen educational reading material and use of on-screen reading material in the school, it seems clear that the quality of material intended for children’s on-screen reading requires careful consideration to ensure that it is of a high standard and that it will facilitate children’s learning. This investigation case study’s digital books intended for learning through reading as found to be available to students of New Zealand Primary Schools. The writer analyses a selection of the products of the two publishers that were found available to primary and intermediate school children at two differentschoolsin two differentsocio-economic schoolregions. The writer outlines specific consideration of typographic presentation with respect to eye movements that will aid in the development of material for children’s on-screen learning including CD-ROM, E-Book, and web-based reading material

    A small scale study into the effect that text & background colour has on processing and self-correction rates for childrens’ on-screen reading

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    Pedagogical practices in formal educational settings together with the nature of communication technologies in the media and elsewhere mean that children will encounter on-screen typography and screen-based learning opportunities in both formal school settings and during their daily recreational pursuits. Internationally, there is a lack of research informing what good reading practice might look like when teachers use reading material in a screen-based environment. More specifically, there is a lack of research around best practices for the design of this material for children. Greater understanding of how the colour of text and the colour of background influences the “readability” of these reading materials is required. This research sets out to determine the readability of text and background colours in on-screen books for young readers through discussion of the literature to date, as well as discussion of a small scale study which includes a rate-of-error experiment as well as qualitative feedback to provide greater knowledge of the most positive reading environments for children
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