19 research outputs found

    Electrostatics in a simple wormhole revisited

    Full text link
    The electrostatic potential generated by a point charge at rest in a simple static, spherically symmetric wormhole is given in the form of series of multipoles and in closed form. The general potential which is physically acceptable depends on a parameter due to the fact that the monopole solution is arbitrary. When the wormhole has Z2-symmetry, the potential is completely determined. The calculation of the electrostatic self-energy and of the self-force is performed in all cases considered.Comment: 16 pages, no figure

    Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at the New Millennium

    Get PDF
    We review the properties and applications of binary and millisecond pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1300. There are now 56 binary and millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk and a further 47 in globular clusters. This review is concerned primarily with the results and spin-offs from these surveys which are of particular interest to the relativity community.Comment: 59 pages, 26 figures, 5 tables. Accepted for publication in Living Reviews in Relativity (http://www.livingreviews.org

    Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Full text link
    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1700. There are now 80 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 103 pulsars in 24 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights have been the discovery of the first ever double pulsar system and a recent flurry of discoveries in globular clusters, in particular Terzan 5.Comment: 77 pages, 30 figures, available on-line at http://www.livingreviews.org/lrr-2005-

    Radio Pulsars

    No full text
    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity

    Two years' prospective experience using fluorescence in situ hybridization on uncultured amniotic fluid cells for rapid prenatal diagnosis of common chromosomal aneuploidies

    No full text
    A probe was generated from the YAC clone 831B9 that was suitable for the prenatal detection of trisomy 21 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This probe was initially tested on a series of 650 unselected amniotic fluid samples prior to the karyotype being available. 630 were correctly identified as having two copies and 13 samples were correctly scored as having three copies of chromosome 21. Seven samples failed to produce a result. A trial was then initiated, reporting to clinicians the interphase. FISH results before cytogenetic analysis had been performed. During the first 18 months of this trial 1504 samples were tested: 1467 were correctly identified as disomic and 35 samples were correctly scored as trisomic for chromosome 21. Two samples failed to produce a result. A chromosome 18 specific probe (LI.84) was employed where there was a relevant clinical indication (181 samples) and 10 samples were correctly scored as having three copies of chromosome 18. Thus, this approach appears to be reliable and is popular with both clinicians and patients due to the speed of the result. However, it does not replace chromosomal analysis on cultured cells, which detected a range of abnormalities besides the trisomies and triploidies detected by FISH. Copyright (C) 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
    corecore