402 research outputs found

    Learning-assisted Theorem Proving with Millions of Lemmas

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    Large formal mathematical libraries consist of millions of atomic inference steps that give rise to a corresponding number of proved statements (lemmas). Analogously to the informal mathematical practice, only a tiny fraction of such statements is named and re-used in later proofs by formal mathematicians. In this work, we suggest and implement criteria defining the estimated usefulness of the HOL Light lemmas for proving further theorems. We use these criteria to mine the large inference graph of the lemmas in the HOL Light and Flyspeck libraries, adding up to millions of the best lemmas to the pool of statements that can be re-used in later proofs. We show that in combination with learning-based relevance filtering, such methods significantly strengthen automated theorem proving of new conjectures over large formal mathematical libraries such as Flyspeck.Comment: journal version of arXiv:1310.2797 (which was submitted to LPAR conference

    Learning-Assisted Automated Reasoning with Flyspeck

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    The considerable mathematical knowledge encoded by the Flyspeck project is combined with external automated theorem provers (ATPs) and machine-learning premise selection methods trained on the proofs, producing an AI system capable of answering a wide range of mathematical queries automatically. The performance of this architecture is evaluated in a bootstrapping scenario emulating the development of Flyspeck from axioms to the last theorem, each time using only the previous theorems and proofs. It is shown that 39% of the 14185 theorems could be proved in a push-button mode (without any high-level advice and user interaction) in 30 seconds of real time on a fourteen-CPU workstation. The necessary work involves: (i) an implementation of sound translations of the HOL Light logic to ATP formalisms: untyped first-order, polymorphic typed first-order, and typed higher-order, (ii) export of the dependency information from HOL Light and ATP proofs for the machine learners, and (iii) choice of suitable representations and methods for learning from previous proofs, and their integration as advisors with HOL Light. This work is described and discussed here, and an initial analysis of the body of proofs that were found fully automatically is provided

    MaLeS: A Framework for Automatic Tuning of Automated Theorem Provers

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    MaLeS is an automatic tuning framework for automated theorem provers. It provides solutions for both the strategy finding as well as the strategy scheduling problem. This paper describes the tool and the methods used in it, and evaluates its performance on three automated theorem provers: E, LEO-II and Satallax. An evaluation on a subset of the TPTP library problems shows that on average a MaLeS-tuned prover solves 8.67% more problems than the prover with its default settings

    HOL(y)Hammer: Online ATP Service for HOL Light

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    HOL(y)Hammer is an online AI/ATP service for formal (computer-understandable) mathematics encoded in the HOL Light system. The service allows its users to upload and automatically process an arbitrary formal development (project) based on HOL Light, and to attack arbitrary conjectures that use the concepts defined in some of the uploaded projects. For that, the service uses several automated reasoning systems combined with several premise selection methods trained on all the project proofs. The projects that are readily available on the server for such query answering include the recent versions of the Flyspeck, Multivariate Analysis and Complex Analysis libraries. The service runs on a 48-CPU server, currently employing in parallel for each task 7 AI/ATP combinations and 4 decision procedures that contribute to its overall performance. The system is also available for local installation by interested users, who can customize it for their own proof development. An Emacs interface allowing parallel asynchronous queries to the service is also provided. The overall structure of the service is outlined, problems that arise and their solutions are discussed, and an initial account of using the system is given
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