17 research outputs found

    Cities and clusters: economy-wide and sector-specific effects in corporate location

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    Are the observed spatial distributions of firms decided mostly by market-mediated, economy-wide locational forces, or rather by non-pecuniary, sector-specific ones? This work finds that the latter kind of forces weight systematically more than the former in deciding firm location. The analysis uses Italian data on a variety of manufacturing and service sectors spatially disaggregated at the level of Local Labor Systems.Industrial Location, Sector-specific Agglomeration, Urbanization Economy, Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    The Spinning Jenny and the Guillotine: Technological Diffusion at the Time of Revolutions

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    Why was England the cradle of the Industrial Revolution? The present work shows that scale economies and demand, combined with the conditions of the relative prices of input factors, allow to provide a purely economic answer to this question. The labor-saving innovations of the Industrial Revolution were profitable only if, after their adoption, sales expanded enough to cover the upfront cost of capital. For some time, England was the only country in which sales exceeded the minimum threshold required to make adoption profitable. This fact is illustrated here by means of a detailed case study centered on the cotton industry and on the adoption of the spinning jenny in England and in France at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. By then, the sufficiently large and relatively well-off English middle class could guarantee to cotton spinners a level of sales that was not viable in France, where income was lower and more concentrated in the hands of the upper classes.Industrial Revolution, income distribution, economies of scale, choice of technique, spinning jenny

    Città e distretti: effetti generali e settoriali nella localizzazione di impresa

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    Are the observed spatial distributions of firms decided mostly by market-mediated, economy-wide locational forces, or rather by non-pecuniary, sector-specific ones? This work finds that the latter kind of forces weight systematically more than the former in deciding firm location. The analysis uses Italian data on manufacturing sectors spatially disaggregated at the level of Local Labor Market Areas. Other than the results for the whole of Italy in 1991 and 2001, the paper also provides results for the four macroregions that compose the country

    The Spinning Jenny and the Industrial Revolution: A Reappraisal

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    Agglomerative Tendencies and Regional Industrial Variety

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    This work does two things. On one hand, it verifies inter-sectoral differences in terms of agglomerative strengths and patterns; while, on the other, it examines the relation between agglomerative tendencies and regional industrial variety for some of the most agglomerated sectors. The analysis uses Italian data from four Census of Manufactures and Services (1971, 1981, 1991, 2001)

    Cities and Clusters: Economy-Wide and Sector-Specific Effects in Corporate Location

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    International audienceAre the observed spatial distributions of firms decided mostly by economy-wide urbanization economies or rather by sector-specific localization economies? This paper finds that the latter kind of forces weight systematically more than the former in deciding firm location. The analysis uses Italian data on a variety of manufacturing and service sectors spatially disaggregated at the level of local labour market areas

    Non-linear externalities in firm localization

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    ISSN(ONLINE) 2284-0400This paper presents a model of firm localization allowing for non-linear, quadratic externalities. The model disentangles localization externalities from the intrinsic advantages of regions, while the inferential analysis on its parameters verifies whether externalities may have a non-linear shape. Specifically, the introduction of a quadratic term can accommodate both more-than-linear positive feedbacks as well as congestion effects. If the quadratic term is sufficiently negative, one location can reach the point in which the addition of an extra firm decreases the probability for that same location to further attract other firms. In this sense, the present model does not assume a priori that the localization choices of firms are characterized by positive interdependencies. Rather, the methodology allows to estimate whether or not this is actually the case. Our main result is that the quadratic term is virtually never found to be statistically different from zero across Italian sectors observed at the scale of commuting zones, so that localized externalities seem to be well approximated by a linear specification

    A numerical estimation method for discrete choice models with non-linear externalities

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    A stochastic discrete choice model and its related estimation method are presented which allow to disentangle non-linear externalities from the intrinsic features of the objects of choice and from the idiosyncratic preferences of agents. Having veried for the ergodicity of the underlying stochastic process, parameter estimates are obtained through numerical methods and so is their statistical signicance. In particular, optimization rests on successive parabolic interpolation. Finally, the model and its related estimation method are applied to the case of rm localization using Italian sectoral census data
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