37 research outputs found

    Ma hea – which way? Mo te aha – what for?

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    Keynote address to the annual conference of the NZ Psychological Society, 28 August 2004 E rau rangatira ma, tena ra koutou…. This presentation will be in four sections. The first section will introduce two major issues, mana motuhake, and manatangata, then we will consider some proposed legislation, the Seabed & Foreshore Bill and the Civil Union Bill. We will then consider strategic Maori response to political pressure over the last three decades, and then note two recent and dramatic examples. They are the Hikoi Takutai Moana, April 2004, and the Enough is Enough Rally, August 2004 In the final section, we will consider the implications for psychologies and psychologists working today in Aotearoa

    Ta moko: Maori tattoo

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    The author examines the history, technique and meaning of ta moko (Maori tattoo) from prehistory to modern times

    Memento Mori : Memento Maori – moko and memory

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    Moko patterns, mau moko, “wearing ink” is often explained as an act of remembrance, a symbol of honour or success, of grieving or loss. Memento mori, remembering the dead and remembrance of death, pervades the Maori world, and is profoundly expressed in customary practice – haehae, upoko tuhi, and ta moko. These embodied and visceral experiences are described in waiata tangi, in whai korero, in moteatea, in the traditional context, and graphically recorded on the living flesh in our contemporary world. Mau moko celebrates identity, so modern memorial ornamentation mourns and reflects on this in ‘memento mori’; and also reinforces and engages reality in the correspondent notion of ‘memento Maori’; an assertion that claims dominion and understanding across generations, across time, across space

    Ta Moko: Culture, body modification, and the psychology of identity.

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    This paper outlines the context of Ta Moko in the Māori world, and locates the practice in the Pacific, and in the twenty first century. It describes the resurgence of the practice, and comments on the aims of the Marsen project. The three principal aims are: 1. To complete a comprehensive survey of the chant record and oral history with reference to archaeological, archival and artefactual materials. 2. To examine traditional whakairo carving in relation to Ta Moko. 3. To explore the nature of social relationships and ecologies that are supportive of, or resistant, to contemporary Ta Moko

    Arnold Manaaki Wilson: Te Awakaunua

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    Arnold Manaaki Wilson was born in 1928, in Ruatoki, a community which nestles beneath the misty Taiarahia hills, following the curves of the Ohinemataroa river valley – known to others as of his tuhoe people. They know him there as Te Wakaunua, after a provocative late 19th century political visionary. From Such radical Tuhoe ideas fused with the sculptural genius of his father, a renowned carver of the art-making Ngati Tarawhai of Te Arawa, Arnold Wilson emerged

    Maori women and research: Researching ourselves

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    This was the closing keynote address at the Student Symposium organized by the Maori & Psychology Research Unit at the University of Waikato, Hamilton in August 1999. Most of the people attending were Maori, and female, and I spoke to, for, and about us. The speech was transcribed from an oral address with transparencies, and has been revised here for this publication

    The city of Rotorua and its meaning to Ngati Whakaue

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    This paper discusses the history and settlement of the city of Rotorua as it relates to Ngati Whakaue

    The sociocultural impact of tourism on the Te Arawa people of Rotorua, New Zealand

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    This is a study of how tourism in New Zealand has affected a major tribal community; their insights, reactions, and experiences. Covering five generations, it presents an oral account of the actively concerned social groups. Wherever possible, or necessary, this is reiterated and reinforced by the written record. The work comprises two parts, the first which outlines the historic background according to available documentation, and the second which focusses on particular aspects of tribal culture and experience. Material for this section, otherwise unrecorded, came from the narrated stories, reminiscences, and often shrewd observations of the people themselves. It deals with residential community, song and dance, arts and crafts, and the role of women. As an essentially ethnographic commentary, the study does not examine the economic features or effects of tourism, except where fiscal factors are pertinent to the understanding or continuity of the Te Arawa experience of the tourist world

    Mā hea (which way)? Mō te aha (what for)? Too many questions, not enough answers, for Māori on the march

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    This presentation will be in four sections. The first section introduces two major issues: mana motuhake, and mana tāngata, then we will consider some proposed legislation: the Foreshore and Seabed Bill and the Civil Union Bill. Then I will look at strategic Māori responses to political pressure over the last three decades and note two recent and dramatic examples – the Hīkoi Takutai Moana, April 2004, and the Enough is Enough Rally, August 2004. The final section considers the implications for psychologies and psychologists working today in Aotearoa

    Cultural tattoos: meanings, descriptors, and attributions

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    Body piercing and tattoo/ta moko were initially seen to be practiced by sailors, criminals, specific cultural groups (e.g., Māori), or sub-cultural groups (e.g., bikers, gang members, adolescents). In recent times, these practices have become part of mainstream popular culture, and are enjoyed by a wide range of people. In this study, we set out to explore patterns of body modifying behaviour engaged in, or commented on, by a sample of university students. We invited undergraduate psychology students from two courses to complete an ‘online’ questionnaire. Students logged on to a web site, were presented with an information sheet, and invited to respond. In this paper, we present the reasons why people in this sample decided to obtain a tattoo and the meanings they ascribe to their modifications. We will also consider the observations that people make of those who have culturally inspired tattoos
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