7 research outputs found

    Two Left Feet: Dancing in Academe to the Rhythms of Neoliberal Discourse.

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    Following the recommendations by the 2008 Bradley Report into higher education, cultural competence training has attracted attention and funding in Australian universities. This paper attempts to initiate a conversation about the implications of cultural competence in its current formation as it also attends to the tensions we experience as non-Indigenous educators teaching both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. We argue that current models of cultural competence are structured by the prevailing neoliberalist discourse that continues to regulate Australian universities, through language and practice. Drawing on the metaphor of dance, we locate the ‘steps’ that find us, awkwardly at times, attempting to balance the demands of university policy with the cultural diversity and multiple subjectivities of our students. We contend that from within the current framework of cultural competence, attempts to locate an ethical practice that speaks to the increasingly culturally diverse student cohorts in our classrooms are becoming increasingly complex

    SPLiCE Phase 1: sustainable pathways to low carbon energy – final report

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    A major transformation is underway to decarbonise UK energy generation and use in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050. Numerous potential pathways for achieving the 2050 emissions target demand significant new energy infrastructure in various forms, as well as substantial increases in energy efficiency across the economy. The Sustainable Pathways to Low Carbon Energy (SPLiCE) research programme seeks to provide significant information about the wide-ranging potential environmental, social and economic impacts of decarbonising the UK energy system. Information needs to be presented in a way that enables informed choices to be made about different configurations of the energy system framed within a wider context. The intention is that the programme would seek to identify what is known and not known about the impacts of different energy system components and then fill any key evidence gaps, either directly or by encouraging others to do so. The full SPLiCE Programme was planned to be delivered in two or three phases. The key research questions for the whole programme are: • How can Government compare all the significant impacts of the energy decarbonisation options available, so that evidence-based choices can be made about the best mix of options to pursue? • How can developers, planners and regulators access comprehensive and authoritative information about the impacts of energy infrastructure and other energy choices in order to make decisions about investment, deployment and impact mitigation? • How can Government, industry and the research community present reliable, easy to understand information on impacts in order to improve public understanding and help engage the public and other interest groups to debate and build consensus around future energy options? Phase 1 was a scoping study to examine how these aims could be met and create a blueprint for possible future phases. The objectives for SPLiCE Phase were couched in terms of six outputs to develop an understanding of the sustainability (environmental, social and economic) of energy supply and demand options. These are summarised as: 1. A report on the significant evidence gaps on the impacts of energy supply and demand options. 2. A detailed written method for carrying out systematic evidence reviews on the environmental, social and economic impacts of energy supply and demand options. 3. A design specification and a set of data requirements for a knowledge gateway/repository (KG) which would contain the sort of impact analysis developed in output 2 above. 4. Recommendations on whether the very different impacts (environmental, social and economic) of a very diverse range of energy supply and demand options could be assessed and valued. 5. Recommendations for how information about the impacts, risks and benefits of future energy options can be made more easily available and accessible to the public in order to inform debate about choices and trade-offs 6. A recommended process/roadmap/project plan for future work

    Starlikeness of Libera transformation (II) (Applications of Complex Function Theory to Differential Equations)

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    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017 (IDP2017) is the second publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2016. The IDP2017 includes data from the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern and Indian oceans, with about twice the data volume of the previous IDP2014. For the first time, the IDP2017 contains data for a large suite of biogeochemical parameters as well as aerosol and rain data characterising atmospheric trace element and isotope (TEI) sources. The TEI data in the IDP2017 are quality controlled by careful assessment of intercalibration results and multi-laboratory data comparisons at crossover stations. The IDP2017 consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 450 TEIs as well as standard hydrographic parameters, and (2) the eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas providing an on-line atlas that includes more than 590 section plots and 130 animated 3D scenes. The digital data are provided in several formats, including ASCII, Excel spreadsheet, netCDF, and Ocean Data View collection. Users can download the full data packages or make their own custom selections with a new on-line data extraction service. In addition to the actual data values, the IDP2017 also contains data quality flags and 1-σ data error values where available. Quality flags and error values are useful for data filtering and for statistical analysis. Metadata about data originators, analytical methods and original publications related to the data are linked in an easily accessible way. The eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas is the visual representation of the IDP2017 as section plots and rotating 3D scenes. The basin-wide 3D scenes combine data from many cruises and provide quick overviews of large-scale tracer distributions. These 3D scenes provide geographical and bathymetric context that is crucial for the interpretation and assessment of tracer plumes near ocean margins or along ridges. The IDP2017 is the result of a truly international effort involving 326 researchers from 25 countries. This publication provides the critical reference for unpublished data, as well as for studies that make use of a large cross-section of data from the IDP2017. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Conway GEOTRACES - edited by Tim M. Conway, Tristan Horner, Yves Plancherel, and Aridane G. González

    The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017

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    Unidad de excelencia María de Maeztu MdM-2015-0552The GEOTRACES Intermediate Data Product 2017 (IDP2017) is the second publicly available data product of the international GEOTRACES programme, and contains data measured and quality controlled before the end of 2016. The IDP2017 includes data from the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Southern and Indian oceans, with about twice the data volume of the previous IDP2014. For the first time, the IDP2017 contains data for a large suite of biogeochemical parameters as well as aerosol and rain data characterising atmospheric trace element and isotope (TEI) sources. The TEI data in the IDP2017 are quality controlled by careful assessment of intercalibration results and multi-laboratory data comparisons at crossover stations. The IDP2017 consists of two parts: (1) a compilation of digital data for more than 450 TEIs as well as standard hydrographic parameters, and (2) the eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas providing an on-line atlas that includes more than 590 section plots and 130 animated 3D scenes. The digital data are provided in several formats, including ASCII, Excel spreadsheet, netCDF, and Ocean Data View collection. Users can download the full data packages or make their own custom selections with a new on-line data extraction service. In addition to the actual data values, the IDP2017 also contains data quality flags and 1-σ data error values where available. Quality flags and error values are useful for data filtering and for statistical analysis. Metadata about data originators, analytical methods and original publications related to the data are linked in an easily accessible way. The eGEOTRACES Electronic Atlas is the visual representation of the IDP2017 as section plots and rotating 3D scenes. The basin-wide 3D scenes combine data from many cruises and provide quick overviews of large-scale tracer distributions. These 3D scenes provide geographical and bathymetric context that is crucial for the interpretation and assessment of tracer plumes near ocean margins or along ridges. The IDP2017 is the result of a truly international effort involving 326 researchers from 25 countries. This publication provides the critical reference for unpublished data, as well as for studies that make use of a large cross-section of data from the IDP2017. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Conway GEOTRACES - edited by Tim M. Conway, Tristan Horner, Yves Plancherel, and Aridane G. González
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