13 research outputs found

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    Self-Charging Piezo-Supercapacitor: One-Step Mechanical Energy Conversion and Storage

    No full text
    With the contemplations of ecological and environmental issues related to energy harvesting, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) may be an accessible, sustainable, and abundant elective wellspring of energy in the future. The PNGs’ power output, however, is dependent on the mechanical energy input, which will be intermittent if the mechanical energy is not continuous. This is a fatal flaw for electronics that need continuous power. Here, a self-charging flexible supercapacitor (PSCFS) is successfully realized that can harvest sporadic mechanical energy, convert it to electrical energy, and simultaneously store power. Initially, chemically processed multimetallic oxide, namely, copper cobalt nickel oxide (CuCoNiO4) is amalgamated within the poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) framework in different wt % to realize high-performance PNGs. The combination of CuCoNiO4 as filler creates a notable electroactive phase inside the PVDF matrix, and the composite realized by combining 1 wt % CuCoNiO4 with PVDF, coined as PNCU 1, exhibits the highest electroactive phase (>86%). Under periodic hammering (∼100 kPa), PNGs fabricated with this optimized composite film deliver an instantaneous voltage of ∼67.9 V and a current of ∼4.15 μA. Furthermore, PNG 1 is ingeniously integrated into a supercapacitor to construct PSCFS, using PNCU 1 as a separator and CuCoNiO4 nanowires on carbon cloth (CC) as the positive and negative electrodes. The self-charging behavior of the rectifier-free storage device was established under bending deformation. The PSCFS device exhibits ∼845 mV from its initial open-circuit potential ∼35 mV in ∼220 s under periodic bending of 180° at a frequency of 1 Hz. The PSCFS can power up various portable electronic appliances such as calculators, watches, and LEDs. This work offers a high-performance, self-powered device that can be used to replace bulky batteries in everyday electronic devices by harnessing mechanical energy, converting mechanical energy from its environment into electrical energy

    CsPbI<sub>3</sub>–PVDF Composite-Based Multimode Hybrid Piezo-Triboelectric Nanogenerator: Self-Powered Moisture Monitoring System

    No full text
    For several decades, the development of potential flexible electronics, such as electronic skin, wearable technology, environmental monitoring systems, and the internet of Things network, has been emphasized. In this context, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PENGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly regarded due to their simple design, high output performance, and cost-effectiveness. On a smaller scale, self-powered sensor research and development based on piezo-triboelectric hybrid nanogenerators have lately become more popular. When a material in the TENG is a piezoelectric material, these two distinct effects can be coupled. Herein, we developed a multimode hybrid piezo-triboelectric nanogenerator using the CsPbI3–PVDF composite. The addition of CsPbI3 to PVDF significantly enhances its electroactive phase and dielectric property, thereby enhancing its surface charge density. 5 wt % CsPbI3 incorporation in poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) results in a high electroactive phase (FEA) value of >90%. Moreover, CsPbI3–PVDF composite-based PENGs were fabricated in three modes, viz., nanogenerators in contact–separation mode (TECS), single electrode mode (TESE), and sliding mode (TES), and the output performance of all the devices was investigated. The fabricated TECS, TESE, and TES reveal peak output powers of 3.08, 1.29, and 0.15 mW at an external load of 5.6 MΩ. Through analysis of the contact angle measurement and experimental quantification, the hydrophilicity of the composite film has been identified. The hydrophobicity and moisture absorption capacity of CsPbI3–PVDF film make it an attractive option for self-powered humidity monitoring. The TENGs effectively powered several low-powered electronic devices with just a few human finger taps. This study offers a high-performance PTENG device that is reliant on ambient humidity, which is a helpful step toward creating a self-powered sensor

    CsPbI<sub>3</sub>–PVDF Composite-Based Multimode Hybrid Piezo-Triboelectric Nanogenerator: Self-Powered Moisture Monitoring System

    No full text
    For several decades, the development of potential flexible electronics, such as electronic skin, wearable technology, environmental monitoring systems, and the internet of Things network, has been emphasized. In this context, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PENGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly regarded due to their simple design, high output performance, and cost-effectiveness. On a smaller scale, self-powered sensor research and development based on piezo-triboelectric hybrid nanogenerators have lately become more popular. When a material in the TENG is a piezoelectric material, these two distinct effects can be coupled. Herein, we developed a multimode hybrid piezo-triboelectric nanogenerator using the CsPbI3–PVDF composite. The addition of CsPbI3 to PVDF significantly enhances its electroactive phase and dielectric property, thereby enhancing its surface charge density. 5 wt % CsPbI3 incorporation in poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) results in a high electroactive phase (FEA) value of >90%. Moreover, CsPbI3–PVDF composite-based PENGs were fabricated in three modes, viz., nanogenerators in contact–separation mode (TECS), single electrode mode (TESE), and sliding mode (TES), and the output performance of all the devices was investigated. The fabricated TECS, TESE, and TES reveal peak output powers of 3.08, 1.29, and 0.15 mW at an external load of 5.6 MΩ. Through analysis of the contact angle measurement and experimental quantification, the hydrophilicity of the composite film has been identified. The hydrophobicity and moisture absorption capacity of CsPbI3–PVDF film make it an attractive option for self-powered humidity monitoring. The TENGs effectively powered several low-powered electronic devices with just a few human finger taps. This study offers a high-performance PTENG device that is reliant on ambient humidity, which is a helpful step toward creating a self-powered sensor

    CsPbI<sub>3</sub>–PVDF Composite-Based Multimode Hybrid Piezo-Triboelectric Nanogenerator: Self-Powered Moisture Monitoring System

    No full text
    For several decades, the development of potential flexible electronics, such as electronic skin, wearable technology, environmental monitoring systems, and the internet of Things network, has been emphasized. In this context, piezoelectric nanogenerators (PENGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly regarded due to their simple design, high output performance, and cost-effectiveness. On a smaller scale, self-powered sensor research and development based on piezo-triboelectric hybrid nanogenerators have lately become more popular. When a material in the TENG is a piezoelectric material, these two distinct effects can be coupled. Herein, we developed a multimode hybrid piezo-triboelectric nanogenerator using the CsPbI3–PVDF composite. The addition of CsPbI3 to PVDF significantly enhances its electroactive phase and dielectric property, thereby enhancing its surface charge density. 5 wt % CsPbI3 incorporation in poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) results in a high electroactive phase (FEA) value of >90%. Moreover, CsPbI3–PVDF composite-based PENGs were fabricated in three modes, viz., nanogenerators in contact–separation mode (TECS), single electrode mode (TESE), and sliding mode (TES), and the output performance of all the devices was investigated. The fabricated TECS, TESE, and TES reveal peak output powers of 3.08, 1.29, and 0.15 mW at an external load of 5.6 MΩ. Through analysis of the contact angle measurement and experimental quantification, the hydrophilicity of the composite film has been identified. The hydrophobicity and moisture absorption capacity of CsPbI3–PVDF film make it an attractive option for self-powered humidity monitoring. The TENGs effectively powered several low-powered electronic devices with just a few human finger taps. This study offers a high-performance PTENG device that is reliant on ambient humidity, which is a helpful step toward creating a self-powered sensor
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