10 research outputs found

    Synergy effects of international policy instruments to reduce deforestation: a cross-country panel data analysis

    Get PDF
    Safeguarding tropical rainforests is one of the most important challenges for the future, particularly to mitigate climate change. The international community has actively sought international policy solutions to curb deforestation in tropical countries. Debt-for-nature swaps and certification of sustainable forest management have been implemented by NGOs. Some states are currently negotiating the implementation of the REDD (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) mechanism, a North-South financial transfer to compensate countries for avoided deforestation. However, little is known about the efficiency of these instruments. We argue that they may have a double effect: an expected direct impact on deforestation linked to the conditionalities of instruments, and an indirect impact due to their feedback effects on macroeconomic variables, affecting in turn the drivers of deforestation. The second effect is often overlooked by policy makers [...].

    The REDD scheme to curb deforestation: A well-designed system of incentives?

    Get PDF
    Bioprospection is, largely, meant to help reducing deforestation and, the other way around, stopping deforestation enhances the prospects of bioprospection. The need for a global agreement to the problem of tropical deforestation has led to the REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) scheme, which proposes that developed countries pay developing countries for CO2 emissions saved through avoided deforestation and degradation. The remaining issue at stake is to definer the rules defning payments to countries reducing their deforestation rate. This article develops a game-theoretic bargaining model, simulating the on-going negotiation process which is currently taking place within the Convention of Climate Change, after the Copenhagen agreement of December 2009. It shows that the conditions under which developing countries are left to bargain over the allocation of the global forest fund may lead to an ineffective system of incentives. Below a given level of contributions from the North, the mechanism fails to curb the deforestation. Beyond this level, it induces perverse effects: the larger the North's contribution, the larger the deforestation rate. Consequently, the mechanism is most effective only at a specifc threshold level which, given the unobservability of countries'preferences, can only be found by a repeated "trial and error" implementation process.

    Implementation of national and international REDD mechanism under alternative payments for environemtal services: theory and illustration from Sumatra

    Get PDF
    This paper develops an analytical model of a REDD+ mechanism with an international payment tier and a national payment tier, and calibrate land users' opportunity cost curves based on data from Sumatra. We compare the avoided deforestation and cost-eciency of government purchases across the two types of contracts fixed price and opportunity cost, and across two government types "benevolent" and "budget maximizing". Our paper shows that a fixed-price scheme is likely to be more efficient than an opportunity-cost compensation scheme at low international carbon prices, when the government is "benevolent" or when variation in opportunity cost within land users is high relative to variation in opportunity cost across land users. Thus, a PES program which pays local communities or land users based on the value of the service provided by avoided deforestation may not only distribute REDD revenue more equitably than an opportunity cost-based payment system, but may be more cost-efficient as well.

    International economic instruments for the reduction of tropical deforestation : the example of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation)

    No full text
    Réduire la déforestation dans les pays tropicaux est un des principaux défis pour la communauté internationale dans le cadre du processus de négociations de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur le Changement Climatique (CCNUCC). En effet, la déforestation est la seconde source d'émissions de gaz à effets de serre, juste derrière les émissions industrielles. Depuis 2005, un nouvel instrument international pour réduire les émissions de carbone liées à la déforestation tropicale est en négociation à la CCNUCC. Ce mécanisme, appelé REDD+ (Réduction des Emissions liées à la Déforestation et Dégradation des forêts) repose sur un système de compensation financière des pays en développement pour leurs efforts en termes de déforestation évitée. Cependant, la mise en œuvre du mécanisme REDD+ à l'échelle nationale et internationale soulève de nombreux problèmes méthodologiques et rencontre de nombreux obstacles. Le but de la thèse est double. Dans une première partie, une description et une analyse du mécanisme REDD+ est réalisée. Dans une deuxième partie, de nouvelles perspectives concernant le design du mécanisme REDD+ et sur sa mise en œuvre sont offertes, en se basant sur trois essais rédigés en format article. Le premier essai propose un modèle de théorie des jeux reflétant le processus de négociation Nord-Sud du mécanisme REDD. Il étudie les conditions régissant le partage de fonds entre les pays en développement et leurs impacts sur l'efficacité du système d'incitations. Le deuxième essai utilise un modèle en économétrie de panel pour différencier des comportements nationaux de déforestation selon la dotation relative en forêts de chaque pays. Le troisième essai s'intéresse à la mise en œuvre du mécanisme REDD+, en comparant les résultats de deux programmes de paiement pour services environnementaux pour deux types de gouvernements. Le modèle développé dans cet essai est ensuite testé dans le contexte de la déforestation en Indonésie, grâce à une base de données fournie par l'ONG Conservation International.Curbing deforestation in tropical countries is one of the main current challenges for international community in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Indeed, deforestation is the second leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions just behind industrial emissions. Since 2005, a new instrument to slow down CO2 emissions from tropical deforestation is under negotiations at the UNFCCC. This mechanism, called REDD+ (for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation) is supported by a simple principle: it consists to reward developing countries for their efforts to avoid deforestation. However, the national and international implementations of REDD+ raise lot of methodological questions and meet several hurdles. The aims of the thesis are twofold. First, it proposes a description and an analysis of the REDD+ mechanism. Second, it is composed by three essays, which raise some questions about REDD+ design and implementation, in order to offer new perspectives on this mechanism. The first essay develops a game-theoretic bargaining model, simulating the on-going negotiation process over the REDD+ mechanism. It shows that the conditions under which developing countries are left to bargain over the allocation of the global forest fund may lead to an ineffective system of incentives. The second essay used a panel data analysis to reveal contrasted deforestation behaviors of tropical countries according to their relative endowment in forest cover. The aim of the third essay offered an illustration of REDD+ implementation, comparing the outcomes in terms of avoided deforestation and utility of two payments for environmental services designs for two types of governments. The model developed in this article is applied in the Indonesian context of deforestation, thanks to a database supplied by the NGO Conservation International

    Les instruments économiques pour la réduction de la déforestation tropicale : l’exemple du mécanisme REDD (Réduction des Emissions liées à la Déforestation et la Dégradation des Forêts).

    No full text
    Diffusion du document : publique Diplôme : Dr. d'UniversitéInternational economic instruments for the reduction of tropical deforestation: the example of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation). Abstract: Curbing deforestation in tropical countries is one of the main current challenges for international community in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Indeed, deforestation is the second leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions just behind industrial emissions. Since 2005, a new instrument to slow down CO2 emissions from tropical deforestation is under negotiations at the UNFCCC. This mechanism, called REDD+ (for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation) is supported by a simple principle: it consists to reward developing countries for their efforts to avoid deforestation. However, the national and international implementations of REDD+ raise lot of methodological questions and meet several hurdles. The aims of the thesis are twofold. First, it proposes a description and an analysis of the REDD+ mechanism. Second, it is composed by three essays, which raise some questions about REDD+ design and implementation, in order to offer new perspectives on this mechanism. The first essay develops a game-theoretic bargaining model, simulating the on-going negotiation process over the REDD+ mechanism. It shows that the conditions under which developing countries are left to bargain over the allocation of the global forest fund may lead to an ineffective system of incentives. The second essay used a panel data analysis to reveal contrasted deforestation behaviors of tropical countries according to their relative endowment in forest cover. The aim of the third essay offered an illustration of REDD+ implementation, comparing the outcomes in terms of avoided deforestation and utility of two payments for environmental services designs for two types of governments. The model developed in this article is applied in the Indonesian context of deforestation, thanks to a database supplied by the NGO Conservation International.Réduire la déforestation dans les pays tropicaux est un des principaux défis pour la communauté internationale dans le cadre du processus de négociations de la Convention Cadre des Nations Unies sur le Changement Climatique (CCNUCC). En effet, la déforestation est la seconde source d’émissions de gaz à effets de serre, juste derrière les émissions industrielles. Depuis 2005, un nouvel instrument international pour réduire les émissions de carbone liées à la déforestation tropicale est en négociation à la CCNUCC. Ce mécanisme, appelé REDD+ (Réduction des Emissions liées à la Déforestation et Dégradation des forêts) repose sur un système de compensation financière des pays en développement pour leurs efforts en termes de déforestation évitée. Cependant, la mise en oeuvre du mécanisme REDD+ à l’échelle nationale et internationale soulève de nombreux problèmes méthodologiques et rencontre de nombreux obstacles. Le but de la thèse est double. Dans une première partie, une description et une analyse du mécanisme REDD+ est réalisée. Dans une deuxième partie, de nouvelles perspectives concernant le design du mécanisme REDD+ et sur sa mise en oeuvre sont offertes, en se basant sur trois essais rédigés en format article. Le premier essai propose un modèle de théorie des jeux reflétant le processus de négociation Nord-Sud du mécanisme REDD. Il étudie les conditions régissant le partage de fonds entre les pays en développement et leurs impacts sur l’efficacité du système d’incitations. Le deuxième essai utilise un modèle en économétrie de panel pour différencier des comportements nationaux de déforestation selon la dotation relative en forêts de chaque pays. Le troisième essai s’intéresse à la mise en oeuvre du mécanisme REDD+, en comparant les résultats de deux programmes de paiement pour services environnementaux pour deux types de gouvernements. Le modèle développé dans cet essai est ensuite testé dans le contexte de la déforestation en Indonésie, grâce à une base de données fournie par l’ONG Conservation International

    Efficient payments in a two-tiered REDD mechanism : theory and illustration from Sumatra

    No full text
    This paper develops an analytical model of a REDD+ mechanism with an international payment tier and a national payment tier, and calibrates land users' opportunity cost curves based on data from Sumatra, Indonesia. We compare the avoided deforestation and cost- effciency of government purchases across two payment types (fixed price_ and _opportunity cost_), and across two government types (_benevolent_ and _budget maximizing_). Our pa- per shows that fixed-price payments are likely to be more effcient than opportunity-cost compensation payments at low international carbon prices, when the government is _benevolent,_ or when variation in opportunity cost within land users is high relative to variation in opportunity cost across land users. Thus, a program which pays local communities or land users based on the value of the global climate service provided by avoided deforestation may not only distribute REDD revenue more equitably than an opportunity cost-based payment system, but may be more cost-effcient as wel

    The REDD scheme to curb deforestation: a well-designed system of incentives?

    No full text
    The need for a global agreement to the problem of tropical deforestation has led to the REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) scheme, which proposes that the developed countries pay developing countries for CO2 emissions saved through avoided deforestation and forest degradation. The remaining issue is specifying the rules defining payments to countries that reduce their deforestation levels. This article develops a game-theoretic bargaining model, simulating the on-going negotiation process which is currently taking place within the Convention on Climate Change, after the Copenhagen agreement of December 2009. It shows that the conditions under which developing countries are left to bargain over the allocation of the global forest fund may lead to an ineffective system of incentives. Below a given level of contributions from the North, the mechanism fails to curb deforestation. Beyond this level, it induces perverse effects: the larger the North's contribution, the larger the deforestation decisions. Consequently, the mechanism is most effective only at a specific threshold, which, given the unobservability of countries'preferences, can only be found by a repeated “trial and error” implementation process

    The implementation of the national and international transfers to reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation

    No full text
    La Réduction des Emissions liées à la Déforestation et la Dégradation des forêts est un nouveau mécanisme pour l'atténuation du changement climatique négocié à la CCNUCC. L'objectif de ce mécanisme est de compenser les pays du Sud pour leurs efforts de diminution d'émissions de carbone liés à la déforestation. Les pays du Nord mobilisent actuellement des fonds destinés à être transférés vers les pays du Sud qui diminuent leur taux de déforestation. Pour freiner leur taux de déforestation, les pays du Sud doivent inciter les agents de la déforestation à réduire leurs activités. Actuellement, environ 75% de la déforestation tropicale est due à l'expansion agricole. Le mécanisme d'incitation le plus en vue pour freiner cette expansion agricole est le système de paiements pour services environnementaux. Le principe est de payer les agents de la déforestation pour qu'ils renoncent à la conversion du couvert forestier. L'objectif du papier est double : 1) déterminer le type de paiement que les pays du Sud vont choisir en fonction de leurs préférences 2) déterminer le type de pays du Sud éligibles par les pays du Nord. Nous définissons deux types de gouvernements dans les pays du Sud : des états bienveillants, qui maximisent le bien-être social et des états maximisant le surplus des fonds publics. Dans notre papier, les gouvernements des pays du Sud ont le choix entre deux types de paiement : un paiement fixe par hectare de déforestation évitée ou une compensation exacte des coûts d'opportunité en échange d'un arrêt total de la déforestation. Par ailleurs, grâce à une base de données originale, nous appliquons ce cadre d'analyse à Sumatra, en Indonésie. Cet article permet de mettre en évidence que les intérêts a priori divergents des pays du Sud en termes d'utilité et des pays du Nord en termes de déforestation évitée peuvent être compatibles, notamment en fonction du montant des fonds accordés par le Nord. Par ailleurs, l'hétérogénéité des coûts d'opportunité au sein de la population des agents de la déforestation est un critère déterminant dans l'efficacité des paiements pour services environnementaux
    corecore