5 research outputs found

    Supplemental Material, JBD727871_supplementary_figures - Increasing expertise to a novel script modulates the visual N1 ERP in healthy adults

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    <p> Supplemental Material, JBD727871_supplementary_figures for Increasing expertise to a novel script modulates the visual N1 ERP in healthy adults by Urs Maurer, Catherine McBride, Silvia Brem, Eliane Hunkeler, Markus Mächler, Jens Kronschnabel, Iliana Irini Karipidis, Georgette Pleisch, and Daniel Brandeis in International Journal of Behavioral Development </p

    Supplemental Material, JBD727871_supplementary_table - Increasing expertise to a novel script modulates the visual N1 ERP in healthy adults

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    <p> Supplemental Material, JBD727871_supplementary_table for Increasing expertise to a novel script modulates the visual N1 ERP in healthy adults by Urs Maurer, Catherine McBride, Silvia Brem, Eliane Hunkeler, Markus Mächler, Jens Kronschnabel, Iliana Irini Karipidis, Georgette Pleisch, and Daniel Brandeis in International Journal of Behavioral Development </p

    Choice probabilities (policy π) of the winning model.

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    <p>For each stage of a game (x axis), the model predicts the average probability of choosing yellow colour (<i>P</i><sub><i>y</i></sub>), blue colour (<i>P</i><sub><i>b</i></sub>), or continuing to sample (pink, <i>P</i><sub><i>ND</i></sub>). For the fixed condition (top), OCD patients (right) are more likely to continue sampling in conditions where the majority is not clearly apparent. In the decreasing condition (bottom), the probability of not deciding is lower than in the fixed condition in both groups (less pinkish colours). It is also noteworthy that OCD adolescents flexibly adapt their strategy in the decreasing condition, indicating against a general inflexibility in OCD.</p

    Performance differences in information gathering.

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    <p>Adolescents with OCD won significantly more points than controls across the entire task. This was mainly driven by an increase in points won during the decreasing condition (A). OCD patients opened significantly more boxes (B), but did not differ in performance accuracy (C; accuracy defined as the proportion of choices of the colour that was in the majority of currently opened cards). (D) Total draws to decision correlated significantly with self-reported general indecisiveness in OCD patients, linking task behavior to real-world perceived difficulties. *** p< = .001, ** p < .01, * p < .05, t p < .10.</p

    Increased decision thresholds in patients with OCD.

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    <p>The OCD group showed increased decision thresholds in both conditions. The model’s inherent decision threshold showed a distinction between the OCD group and controls (A). When using the model to simulate data, we again found a marked increase in decision threshold (as indicated by the mean evidence difference at choice at each stage) for OCD patients (B). Note the growing evidence difference for the first few draws increases because the magnitude of the difference in evidence is limited by the actual samples (e.g., the difference after 2 draws can be no more than 2). The increasing errorbars in the decreasing condition at later stages shows that even simulated agents rarely sample beyond the 15th step in this condition.</p
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