79 research outputs found

    The End of Federalism in Telecommunication Regulations?

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    Reliable THz Communications for Outdoor based Applications- Use Cases and Methods

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    Future (beyond 5G) wireless networks will demand high throughput and low latency and would benefit from greenfield, contiguous, and wider bandwidth, all of which THz spectrum can provide. Although THz has been envisioned to be deployed in an indoor setting, with proper enforcement and planning, we can draw a limited number of use cases for outdoor THz communication. THz can provide high capacity and ultra-high throughput but at the cost of high path loss and sensitivity to device orientation/mobility.. We identify scenarios where the use of the THz spectrum for an outdoor setting is justified and their critical operating parameters. We further categorize the applications based on the relative mobility between the access point (AP) and user equipment (UE). We present an approach for deploying THz on an outdoor framework by presenting preliminary technical parameter analysis for scenarios, like wireless backhaul, high-speed kiosks, and the aerial base station (ABS). Our preliminary analysis shows that the application for each of these scenarios is limited based on multiple parameters, such as distance, device mobility, device orientation, user geometry, antenna gain, and environment settings, which requires separate consideration and optimization.Comment: To appear in IEEE CCNC 2020. The document has 4 pages, 13 figures, and 1 tabl

    Bounding the Practical Error of Path Loss Models

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    We seek to provide practical lower bounds on the prediction accuracy of path loss models. We describe and implement 30 propagation models of varying popularity that have been proposed over the last 70 years. Our analysis is performed using a large corpus of measurements collected on production networks operating in the 2.4 GHz ISM, 5.8 GHz UNII, and 900 MHz ISM bands in a diverse set of rural and urban environments. We find that the landscape of path loss models is precarious: typical best-case performance accuracy of these models is on the order of 12–15 dB root mean square error (RMSE) and in practice it can be much worse. Models that can be tuned with measurements and explicit data fitting approaches enable a reduction in RMSE to 8-9 dB. These bounds on modeling error appear to be relatively constant, even in differing environments and at differing frequencies. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of a few well-accepted and well-performing standard models in scenarios where a priori predictions are needed and argue for the use of well-validated, measurement-driven methods whenever possible

    Analysis of the Experimental Licenses of the Federal Communication Commission

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    Experimental licenses have been awarded by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for more than thirty years as a means to promote research and innovation. Indeed, in the past 30 years (since 1987) more than 20,000 licenses have been granted under the Experimental Radio Service (ERS) of the FCC. In this work, we present a comprehensive analysis of the details pertaining to the assignment of these licenses during the past ten years (2007-20016). For this purpose, utilizing publicly available information in the website of the Office of Engineering and Technology of the FCC, we have built a single repository (database) for all the technical and non-technical details of these licenses. This has permitted us to differentiate among the existing types of Experimental Licenses and, subsequently, analyze the multiple details of these licenses. We pay particular attention to the evolution, over time, of various parameters such as number and duration of licenses, frequency of assignment, processing times, operational parameters (mainly authorized frequencies and transmission power levels), purpose of operation, among others. The proposed poster summarizes the methods and findings of our work. We include a brief introduction to the research framework that was implemented. We expose the main characteristics of the conventional experimental licenses and the Special Temporary Authorizations (STAs) in addition to the main results regarding the general processing time for any type of license

    Exploration of the Federal Communications Commission’s Experimental Radio Service (ERS): Understanding ten years of experimental spectrum licenses

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    The Experimental Radio Service (ERS) of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has awarded experimental licenses for more than thirty years as a means to promote research and innovation in wireless technologies. In this work, we present an exploratory analysis of the details pertaining to the assignment of these licenses during the past ten years (2007-2016). For this purpose, we have built a single repository of technical and non-technical details about license applications by scraping publicly available information in the FCC’s website. This has permitted us systematically categorize among the existing types of experimental licenses and, subsequently, analyze their characteristics. We pay particular attention to the evolution of various parameters such as duration of license, frequency of assignment, processing times, operational parameters, among others. In addition, we explore potential trends hidden in ten years of experimental licenses. This allow us to better understand the time burden of obtaining an authorization or the factors that may influence the license granting process.We conclude this work by delving into the details behind the relationship between ERS authorizations and well known wireless technologies, in particular TV White Spaces and 5G
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