14 research outputs found

    The 2005 Metro Atlanta Tri-Jurisdictional Collaborative Homeless Survey Report

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    What are the characteristics of Atlanta's homeless population? Who are they, what circumstances underlie their homeless situation, and what do they perceive as their greatest problems and most pressing needs? These are questions that the Tri-Jurisdictional Collaborative on Homelessness, a working partnership of government representatives and service providers within the City of Atlanta, Fulton County and DeKalb County, want to know. The Collaborative, with the assistance of Pathways Community Network, Inc., sponsored a Homeless Census and Survey in 2003, followed by a similar Census and Survey in 2005. This report analyzes the 2005 Survey results. A questionnaire was administered in March and April of 2005 to over 800 homeless adults who were interviewed on the streets and at service provider locations. This report summarizes their socioeconomic characteristics, their living and employment situations, and their perceived needs. The report also compares the 2005 survey results to those of the earlier survey in 2003. Research Report Number 05-0

    Nonprofit Georgia: Geography

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    This pamphlet summarizes statistics on the nonprofit sector in Georgia, assembled and analyzed by a Nonprofit Studies Program research team. The focus of this second report in the "Nonprofit Georgia" series is the geographic distribution of Georgia's nonprofit resources. Numerous tables and exhibits report on the distribution of public charities and foundations by geographic area, and compare this to the distribution of population and income in the state. Public support and government grants to charities are analyzed by geographic region, as is the geographic distribution of grants by Georgia foundations. Analysis is based primarily on 990 and 990-PF forms filed by Georgia public charities and foundations in 2000 and 2005. This report is a part of ongoing research on public charities and foundations in the state of Georgia, made possible through a generous grant from the Wilbur and Hilda Glenn Family Foundation. Research Report Number 07-0

    Balancing Speed, Equity, and Impact during a Crisis: The Greater Washington Community Foundations Response to COVID-19

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    This report chronicles the genesis and evolution of the Greater Washington Community Foundation's efforts to raise and coordinate funding from a wide range of individual and institutional donors to address the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. With a particular focus on The Community Foundation's COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund, the largest of its kind in the region, this account highlights the balance of various grantmaking imperatives that characterized Greater Washington's philanthropic response to the pandemic more generally

    Nonprofit Georgia At a Glance

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    This pamphlet summarizes statistics on the nonprofit sector in Georgia, assembled and analyzed by a Nonprofit Studies Program research team. Numerous tables and exhibits report on the size and scope of the sector, variations in public charities by subsector and geography, and the characteristics and grantmaking activities of Georgia's top foundations. Analysis was based primarily on 990 and 990-PF forms filed by Georgia public charities and foundations in 2000 and 2005. This report is a part of ongoing research on public charities and foundations in the state of Georgia, made possible through a generous grant from the Wilbur and Hilda Glenn Family Foundation. Research Report Number 07-0

    Participatory Grantmaking: A Test of Rubric Scoring Versus Popular Voting Selection in a Blinded Grantmaking Process

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    Because small, community-based organizations play a critical role in delivering services and expressing diverse community values, it is important to find ways to minimize disparities in their access to philanthropic resources. Participatory grantmaking is widely viewed as a practice with good potential to mitigate this tendency. This article addresses the design of this approach to grantmaking and, specifically, whether changing the decision-making process in addition to changing the decisionmakers has an effect on how grants are allocated. It examines the design of two grant review processes — one based on popular voting, the other a more traditional rubric approach — and compares their outcomes to learn whether a more open and discursive process based on popular voting for grantee selection helps to overcome bias against small organizations. The article concludes with research implications for participatory grantmaking and grantmaking practice. It is hoped that these findings will contribute to the growing body of empirical knowledge around the design of participatory grantmaking processes

    A New Era of Racial Equity in Community Development Finance: Leveraging Private and Philanthropic Commitments in the PostGeorge Floyd Period

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    The brief first reflects on gaps in economic opportunity for capital access and wealth accrual in disadvantaged communities and by race, explaining why it is essential to align community development finance and corporate and philanthropic commitments to community need if the country is to successfully unlock more equitable opportunity for all. Part 1 then examines racial equity commitments made between June 2020 and May 2021; the types of organizations and priorities targeted by these financial commitments; adherence to disbursement timelines; and changes in financial products, services, and grantmaking approaches. Part 2 looks at the uses of community development capital, the role of community development finance in supporting disinvested communities, challenges reported in capital deployment, and 11 potential solutions for addressing these challenges equitably. In part 3, "The Path Forward," we discuss how the federal government can more effectively mobilize the private sector and share four strategies for the corporate and philanthropic sectors, in turn. These steps include strategies to maximize current resources and sustain momentum—such as greater transparency and collaboration and embedding equity in investment decisions—and those that can support longer-term, systemic change that extends more flexible and patient financing, responding to the needs with an even bolder commitment, and embracing equity as a business imperative

    Scoring Federal Legislation for Equity: Definition, Framework, and Potential Application

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    Federal legislation is fundamental to building a nation in which all can participate, prosper, and reach their full potential. Since our nation's founding, in many ways, federal legislation has created and exacerbated racial inequities, leaving one-third of the population experiencing material poverty and preventing our democracy from realizing the promise of equity. To ensure the federal government serves us all, we must accurately understand and assess whether every policy advances or impedes equity. The Equity Scoring Initiative (ESI) exists to establish the foundation for a new legislative scoring regime. By scoring for equity, we can begin to create an accountable, responsive democracy

    The Family Difference? Exploring the Congruence in Grant Distribution Patterns Between Family and Independent Foundations

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    · Using a broad group of family and independent foundations from a representative sample of Georgia foundations, the authors examined differences in giving patterns between family and independent foundations. · Findings confirm the result of previous work that studied large foundations. · There are no substantial differences between family and independent foundations’ preferences even when controlling for a nonprofit’s location and size. · These findings are relevant for discussions about the role of non-family members on boards

    Overcoming the "Do-Gooder Fallacy": Explaining the Adoption of Effectiveness Best Practices in Philanthropic Foundations

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    An adoption model was proposed to examine the influence of four types of organizational factors- organizational capacity, organizational structure, operating environment and grantmaking orientation- on the adoption of four effectiveness best practices, formal evaluation, knowledge management, leadership development and operating grants in philanthropic foundations. Data were collected from a national survey of foundations and the Foundation Center database. The results indicate that the grantmaking orientation of a foundation is the greatest indicator of adoptive behavior. Furthermore, capacity constraints are most relevant to the adoption decision when the adopting practice requires significant investments of time, money and expertise. Given the social and political context in which the effectiveness best practices are associated, this dissertation research has broad relevance for the ways in which foundation behavior is perceived and the means by which that behavior is shaped through policy and practice.Ph.D.Committee Chair: John C. Thomas; Committee Member: David Van Slyke; Committee Member: Eric Twombly; Committee Member: Mary Frank Fox; Committee Member: Theodore Poiste
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