82 research outputs found

    The Life and Miracles of Fisher Alumnus…

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    In lieu of an abstract, below is the essay\u27s first paragraph. My name is Ken Shelton and I am 26 years old. I am a 1999 graduate from Spencer-Van Etten Jr./Sr. High School, of Spencer New York, and a 2003 graduate from St. John Fisher College, where I earned a BA in Religious Studies, with a minor in Philosophy

    Scholarship in the GFU School of Education: High Expectations and High Commitment

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    Christian scholarship is more than this, but it is also mainly an opportunity to tell our stories to peers in our respective content disciplines - and in telling our stories, we are in fact telling God\u27s story of partnering with us in his work. We fully intend this White Paper to be used as a resource within the School of Education and as a way of informing groups outside of the SoE about our work as scholarship, or in another way of saying it, about our work as learners - with both humility and service. Part One: Introduction & Methodology Part Two: Biblical/Theological Foundations of Scholarship Part Three: Scholarship in the School of Education Part Four: Implications of Expectations and Commitmen

    State Loop 195 between Farm to Market 755 and US 83, Starr County, Texas

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    Over the course of two field sessions in May 2016 and in May 2018, SWCA Environmental Consultants (SWCA) conducted an intensive cultural resources survey along the proposed State Loop (SL) 195 from Farm-to-Market (FM) 755 to 1.4 miles west of the intersection of U.S. Highway (US) 83 and Loma Blanca Road in Starr County, Texas. This work augmented previous investigations by Cox-McClain and Hicks and Company. This management summary addresses the cumulative work completed, resources identified, eligibility recommendations, and what remains to be completed. SWCA’s work was conducted in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (54 US Code 306108) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (9 Natural Resources Code 191). Christopher Ringstaff served as Principal Investigator under Texas Antiquities Permit No. 7655. TxDOT proposes construction of a new-location roadway from Farm-to-Market (FM) 755 to 1.4 miles west of the U.S. Highway (US) 83 and Loma Blanca Road intersection in Starr County, Texas. The new-location roadway, SL 195 (formerly US 83 Reliever Route), would be a four-lane divided rural highway located within a typical 350-footwide right-of-way (ROW). The Project is divided and undertaken under three separate CSJs: 3632-01-001, 3632-01-002, and 3632-01-003. The Project’s area of potential effects (APE) is defined as one 350-foot-wide, contiguous ROW (with occasional variance of up to 500 feet wide) extending for 17.4 miles, that consists of an existing ROW and a new ROW. According to typical design sections, the depth of impacts is estimated to be up to 40 feet below the current ground surface for the bridge supports and up to 6 feet in depth for the rest of the project. The entire SL 195 project covers a total area of approximately 824.5 acres. Previous cultural resources investigations by Cox-McClain (2014) and Hicks and Company (2006) evaluated 458.9 acres of the overall project area. SWCA has conducted cultural resources investigations in 2016 and 2018 encompassing 276.4 acres of the overall project area. Cumulatively, 735.3 acres (89 percent) of the SL 195 project alignment has been evaluated while the remaining, non-access, parcels account for 89.2 acres (11 percent) of the total project. The cumulative efforts of these cultural resources investigations recorded 23 archeological sites (41SR234, 41SR242, 41SR243, 41SR342, 41SR376–379, 41SR381, 41SR383–386, 41SR389, 41SR417-419, 41SR425, and 41SR458–462) within the APE (Table 1). These sites are predominantly prehistoric (n=19; 83 percent) campsites or lithic scatters, but four sites (17 percent) are multi-component containing prehistoric and historic earlymiddle twentieth century assemblages. Twenty sites (41SR234, 41SR243, 41SR342, 41SR376–379, 41SR381, 41SR383, 41SR384, 41SR385, 41SR386, 41SR389, 41SR417–41SR419, 41SR425, 41SR458, 41SR460, and 41SR461) are recommended as not eligible for NRHP or SAL designation. Of the remaining three sites, 41SR242 and 41SR459 have undetermined eligibility and warrant avoidance or further investigation while 41SR462 is considered eligible for listing to the NRHP as detailed below. Site 41SR242 is a multi-component site consisting of a Late Archaic camp site with a dense scatter of burned rock and lithic debris and a historic component of unknown age. Based on the initial survey which included SWCA\u27s intensive shovel testing and TxDOTs backhoe trenching, the discovery of a high density debitage feature in apparent intact sediments supported additional work was warranted to determine NRHP and SAL eligibility. Site 41SR242 was tested in February and March 2017 with the results of the investigations forthcoming to the SHPO once the analysis is completed. Site 41SR459 is a prehistoric campsite with surficial and buried deposits consisting of a hearth field (i.e., multiple hearths) and lithic scatter. Due to the buried deposits and abundant earth oven features suggesting an overall high research value. As such, avoidance or additional work (i.e., test excavations) to determine the eligibility for designation as an SAL or for inclusion in the NRHP. Site 41SR462 is a buried multi-component site on Los Olmos Creek containing a dense prehistoric artifact assemblage dating to the Middle Archaic. The site has intact buried, possibly stratified deposits, with an assortment of cultural materials suggesting varied cultural activities suggesting an overall high research value and is considered eligible for listing to the NRHP and as an SAL based on the rarity of the site type, integrity, geomorphic setting, and overall lack of historic land-use modification which is almost unprecedented in the region In summary, 753.4 acres (89 percent) of the overall 17.4-mile long SL195 project encompassing 822.5 acres has been investigated for cultural resources. No access was available for the remaining 89.2 acres (11 percent) of the project area. These remaining areas are recommended for cultural resources investigations. Of the 23 archeological sites encountered during the cultural resources surveys of the project APE, nineteen sites are recommended as not eligible for both the NRHP and SAL designations; no further work is recommended on these sites. Based on the initial survey, site 41SR242 was tested in February and March 2017 with the results of the investigations forthcoming to the SHPO once the analysis is completed. Based on the results of the addendum survey, sites 41SR459 and 41SR462 are recommended as having undetermined NRHP and SAL eligibility; SWCA recommends further investigations to determine eligibility or avoidance. TxDOT concurs but has determined site 41SR462 to eligible for listing to the NRHP and as an SAL based on the rarity of the site type, integrity, geomorphic setting. As reported, the majority of the survey was conducted by SWCA on behalf of TxDOT with supplimental investigations by TxDOT. TxDOT believes the survey represents a reasonable and good faith effort to locate and identify historic properties as per 36 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 800.4(b)(1), and cultural resources as per Subchapter A of Chapter 26 of the Texas Administrative Code, throughout the proposed project APE

    Data Recovery Excavations at the Snakeskin Bluff Site (41GU177), Guadalupe County, Texas

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    On behalf of Central Texas Regional Water Supply Corporation (CTRWSC) and VRRSP Consultants, LLC, SWCA Environmental Consultants (SWCA) conducted archaeological data recovery excavations at multicomponent site 41GU177 (the Snakeskin Bluff Site) within the proposed alignment of the Vista Ridge Regional Water Supply Project (Vista Ridge) in Guadalupe County, Texas. Investigations were conducted in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) (54 United States Code [USC] 306108) and its implementing regulations (36 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 800), in anticipation of a Nationwide Permit 12 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in accordance with Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. In addition, the work is subject to compliance with the Antiquities Code of Texas (ACT), as the Vista Ridge Project will be ultimately owned by CTRWSC, a political subdivision of the State of Texas. The Vista Ridge project will involve construction of an approximately 140-mile-long, 60-inch-diameter water pipeline from north-central San Antonio, Bexar County, to Deanville, Burleson County, Texas. The of area of potential effects (APE) for the Phase I survey efforts included the proposed centerline alignment and a 100-foot-wide corridor (50 feet on either side of centerline), as well as temporary and permanent construction easements, and aboveground facilities, such as pump stations and the northern and southern termini sites. Between June 2015 and March 2018 the cultural resources inventory identified 78 cultural resources (i.e., 64 archaeological sites and 14 isolated finds). Included in that inventory was site 41GU177, originally discovered on August 31, 2015 on the west bank of the Guadalupe River. Site 41GU177 is a stratified prehistoric site on the western high bank of the Guadalupe River southeast of New Braunfels, Texas near the community of McQueeney. The site contains components deposited intermittently from approximately the Late Archaic to Transitional Archaic periods through Late Prehistoric times. The primary components investigated in the excavations span the final Late Archaic period and into the Austin phase of the Late Prehistoric, a timeframe from approximately 2,600 to 900 years ago. The field investigations, conducted between October 2016 and December 2017, included intensive shovel testing, geomorphological study with mechanical excavations, and subsequent hand excavations. This report presents the results of the data recovery investigations conducted from November–December 2017. The survey results and testing results have been previously reported on (Acuña et al. 2016; Rodriguez et al. 2017); the testing results are also presented in Appendix A. SWCA’s work at 41GU177 was conducted under the ACT. The state regulations mandate the evaluation of the site’s eligibility for designation as a State Antiquities Landmark (SAL) or for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The survey and testing investigations were conducted under ACT Permit No. 7295, and the subsequent data recovery was completed under Permit No. 8231. Brandon S.Young served as initial Principal Investigator (PI) on both permits and Christina Nielsen took over asPI on the permits for the final reporting stages of the project. Overall, 34.1 m3 of sediment was excavated from the site during the data recovery through both traditional and feature-focused unit excavations. During these excavations, approximately 22 m2 of Late Prehistoric components were exposed, consisting of rock-lined hearths and 6,496 artifacts. The Late Prehistoric artifacts included Edwards points, Perdiz points, a Fresno point, ceramics, bifaces, an end scraper, a shell bead, various informal lithic tools, ground stone, choppers, debitage, and faunal remains. The Late Prehistoric component was approximately 40–80 cm thick. No cultural features were identified within the underlying Archaic components of the site; however, 3,421 artifacts were recovered including a Zephyr point, bifaces, ground stone, various informal lithic tools, choppers, debitage, and faunal remains. The Transitional Archaic component was approximately 35–60 cm thick; however, the underlying Archaic (and possible older) components were not defined. The excavations were limited to the right-of-way, and consequently the exposure afforded only a partial glimpse of the overall site. Based on the assemblage, the site is interpreted as a logistical base camp as indicated by both formal and informal tool forms and site furniture. Small groups exploited the abundance of lithic raw material and riparian zone resources, making forays into the landscape to hunt and forage. A total of four radiocarbon dates from the Late Prehistoric components reveal several short-term encampments over the course of several centuries from approximately 600 to 1200 B.P. (A.D. 750 to 1350). The Toyah Phase component has some noted disturbances (especially towards the ground surface), but good integrity from where the radiocarbon sample was collected. The Austin Phase component is vertically and horizontally discrete, contains a substantial amount of archaeological materials, and the site structure and radiocarbon dates suggests multiple, discrete occupations. The data recovery investigations at the Snakeskin Bluff site sought to address environmental, technological, chronological, and adaptive changes during the transition from Archaic to Late Prehistoric. As mentioned, the overall artifact and feature recovery at the site was low and disturbances and mixing of components was noted, especially within the upper deposits of the site. Disturbances within the Late Prehistoric Toyah Phase were most prevalent in the eastern portions of the site. The Late Prehistoric Austin Phase component contained intact, well-preserved archaeological deposits containing preserved flora and faunal material, cooking features, and diagnostic implements. The Transitional Archaic (and older) occupations were difficult to characterize, due to limited quantities of temporal diagnostic artifacts, lack of cultural features, and low artifact recovery. Despite these limitations, the data recovered from the cultural components show diachronic shifts between the technological and foraging strategies of the Archaic and Late Prehistoric. In concurrence with the 2016–2017 testing recommendations, the Snakeskin Bluff site is considered eligible for designation as an SAL and for the NRHP. Although not all cultural components of the site were stratigraphically discrete, the Late Prehistoric Austin Phase component revealed intact, well-preserved archaeological deposits that significantly contributed to our understanding of Late Prehistoric patterns. Given the sensitive nature of the cultural deposits at 41GU177, the main concern following the completion of data recovery excavations was the prevention of significant surface and subsurface impacts to the site during clearing and pipeline construction. As such, SWCA developed a site monitoring protocol; methods and results of the monitoring efforts are provided in Appendix H. Contributing components beyond the impact area will not be affected and will be preserved by avoidance; however, it is important to note that these investigations mitigated the project-specific effects, not the entire site. Any future project that could impact the site’s deeper deposits, or those beyond the current right-of-way, warrant further consideration to assess the possibilities for additional contributing components. With these considerations, no further work is recommended

    Significance Testing of Archeological Site 41SR242, The Cornelio Alvarez Sr. Site, Starr County, Texas

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    The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), conducted National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) eligibility testing of the Cornelio Alvarez Sr. site (41SR242) as part of the State Loop (SL) 195 project (Project) (CSJ: 3632-01-001) in Starr County, Texas. Subsequent to the field investigations, SWCA Environmental Consultants (SWCA) conducted artifact analysis, reporting, and curation preparation for the multi-component historic and prehistoric site. Investigations were conducted in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (54 United State Code 30601) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (9 Natural Resources Code). The investigations assessed the site’s eligibility for listing on the NRHP (36 Code of Federal Regulations 60.4) and for designation as a State Antiquities Landmark (SAL; 13 Texas Administrative Code 26.8, 26.12). Christopher W. Ringstaff served as Principal Investigator under Texas Antiquities Permit Number 7912. TxDOT conducted the field investigations were from February 20–24, 2017, and April 10–14, 2017. Site 41SR242 is primarily a Middle to Late Archaic site with lesser Late Prehistoric and perhaps earlier components. The open occupational site is located on an upland margin landform in a tributary valley a few miles from the Rio Grande. The investigations revealed material assemblages consisting of diffusely scattered burned rock, debitage, and lithic tools, which were predominantly recovered from a 30- to 50-cm-thick stratum of mixed artifacts. However, a few concentrations of artifacts were identified, and each location yielded isolated intact features. Formation and post-depositional processes are generally not conducive to preservation of intact archeological surfaces, patterns, or site structure. Although the overall site lacks integrity and potential data yield, isolated discrete behavioral loci are present. Therefore, site 41SR242 is recommended as eligible for the NRHP and as an SAL. This recommendation pertains to the portions of the site within the APE. The site extends beyond the APE, and the areas outside of the APE have not been evaluated

    Significance Testing Of Archeological Sites 41SR242, The Cornelio Alvarez SR. Site, Starr County, Texas

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    The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), conducted National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) eligibility testing of the Cornelio Alvarez Sr. site (41SR242) as part of the State Loop (SL) 195 project (Project) (CSJ: 3632-01-001) in Starr County, Texas. Subsequent to the field investigations, SWCA Environmental Consultants (SWCA) conducted artifact analysis, reporting, and curation preparation for the multi-component historic and prehistoric site. Investigations were conducted in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (54 United State Code 30601) and the Antiquities Code of Texas (9 Natural Resources Code). The investigations assessed the site’s eligibility for listing on the NRHP (36 Code of Federal Regulations 60.4) and for designation as a State Antiquities Landmark (SAL; 13 Texas Administrative Code 26.8, 26.12). Christopher W. Ringstaff served as Principal Investigator under Texas Antiquities Permit Number 7912. TxDOT conducted the field investigations were from February 20–24, 2017, and April 10–14, 2017. Site 41SR242 is primarily a Middle to Late Archaic site with lesser Late Prehistoric and perhaps earlier components. The open occupational site is located on an upland margin landform in a tributary valley a few miles from the Rio Grande. The investigations revealed material assemblages consisting of diffusely scattered burned rock, debitage, and lithic tools, which were predominantly recovered from a 30- to 50- cm-thick stratum of mixed artifacts. However, a few concentrations of artifacts were identified, and each location yielded isolated intact features. Formation and post-depositional processes are generally not conducive to preservation of intact archeological surfaces, patterns, or site structure. Although the overall site lacks integrity and potential data yield, isolated discrete behavioral loci are present. Therefore, site 41SR242 is recommended as eligible for the NRHP and as an SAL. This recommendation pertains to the portions of the site within the APE. The site extends beyond the APE, and the areas outside of the APE have not been evaluated

    DARKNESS: A Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector Integral Field Spectrograph for High-Contrast Astronomy

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    We present DARKNESS (the DARK-speckle Near-infrared Energy-resolving Superconducting Spectrophotometer), the first of several planned integral field spectrographs to use optical/near-infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for high-contrast imaging. The photon counting and simultaneous low-resolution spectroscopy provided by MKIDs will enable real-time speckle control techniques and post-processing speckle suppression at framerates capable of resolving the atmospheric speckles that currently limit high-contrast imaging from the ground. DARKNESS is now operational behind the PALM-3000 extreme adaptive optics system and the Stellar Double Coronagraph at Palomar Observatory. Here we describe the motivation, design, and characterization of the instrument, early on-sky results, and future prospects.Comment: 17 pages, 17 figures. PASP Publishe

    Effects of antiplatelet therapy on stroke risk by brain imaging features of intracerebral haemorrhage and cerebral small vessel diseases: subgroup analyses of the RESTART randomised, open-label trial

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    Background Findings from the RESTART trial suggest that starting antiplatelet therapy might reduce the risk of recurrent symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage compared with avoiding antiplatelet therapy. Brain imaging features of intracerebral haemorrhage and cerebral small vessel diseases (such as cerebral microbleeds) are associated with greater risks of recurrent intracerebral haemorrhage. We did subgroup analyses of the RESTART trial to explore whether these brain imaging features modify the effects of antiplatelet therapy
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