13 research outputs found

    Hierarchical clustering of gene expression in alewives from the Atlantic (AO) and Lake Michigan (LM) populations.

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    <p>Red color reflects overexpression in LM and blue in AO (intermediate expression is in yellow; lack of expression – in white). A total of 621 genes differentially expressed, genes at 8-fold change were used and Euclidean distance metric with centroid (fast) linkage method was implemented.</p

    List of AO- and LM-specific SNPs.

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    i<p>Reference: <i>Danio rerio</i> CDS;</p>ii<p>Reference: <i>Osmerus mordax</i> CDS;</p>iii<p><i>Esox lucius</i> CDS;</p>iv<p>Reference: <i>Ictalurus punctatus</i> CDS;</p>v<p>G<i>allus gallus</i> (75% identity).</p

    Most populated GO classes (Molecular Function) in the transcriptome assembly.

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    <p>Most populated GO classes (Molecular Function) in the transcriptome assembly.</p

    An example of alignment with a group specific SNP (16S ribosomal RNA gene).

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    <p>An example of alignment with a group specific SNP (16S ribosomal RNA gene).</p

    Most differentially expressed genes between AO and LM (P-values are FDR-corrected).

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    <p>Most differentially expressed genes between AO and LM (P-values are FDR-corrected).</p

    Utilizing External Features and a Consensus Field-Based Approach to Determine Sex of Lake Michigan Yellow Perch

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    <p>Understanding fluctuations in population sex ratios is important for evaluating the effects of changes in population demographics and for making informed management decisions. The Yellow Perch <i>Perca flavescens</i>, an important sport fish in Lake Michigan, undergoes sexually dimorphic growth, likely resulting in differing vulnerabilities to angler harvest. However, sex ratio data from angler-harvested fish have not been collected because of the handling time and intrusiveness of the methods for distinguishing sexes. We utilized digital photographs of the urogenital papilla (UGP) from known-sex Yellow Perch to establish a method whereby UGP shape could be used to rapidly, accurately, and inexpensively determine the sex of Yellow Perch. Overall, 88.1% of Yellow Perch examined were assigned to the correct sex, and the sex ratio estimate of 48:87 (female : male) did not differ significantly from the known sex ratio of 46:89. Classification success was not affected by fish sex, TL, or month of collection. Our results demonstrate accurate, rapid, inexpensive, and nonlethal applicability of this method across a wide range of sizes and geographic and temporal scales. Applying this methodology will permit accurate sex ratio estimates for angler-harvested Yellow Perch, which can be used to better understand harvest composition and its implications for management.</p> <p>Received February 17, 2017; accepted June 9, 2017 Published online August 31, 2017</p

    Model output of Ideal Free Distribution simulations

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    The data file contains the model output of the Combined Model. Each row represents one simulation. The first four columns are model parameters that were varied in the simulations (see table A1 in the Appendix for parameter descriptions), and the fifth column is the recorded IFD slope of that simulation. All simulations were run in NetLogo
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