11 research outputs found

    “We don't need no (higher) education” - How the gig economy challenges the education-income paradigm

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    The empirical relationship between educational attainment and pay levels has been widely acknowledged in the labour-economic and labour-sociology literatures. While the causalities underlying this relationship are not conclusively established, researchers broadly agree that higher educational attainment leads to higher income levels in dependent employment, temporary hiring, and freelancing alike. The ‘gig economy’, where workers complete jobs mediated by online platforms, challenges this paradigm as gig workers can access jobs without any educational certificates. Building a theoretical framework based on agency-driven accounts, we investigate whether we can empirically observe a relationship between educational attainment and wage levels in the gig economy. Our OLS regression analyses of 1607 gig workers in 14 Western economies illustrate no statistically significant correlation. Instead, the platform's review system as well as the gig workers' level of previous job experience serve as the major signalling mechanisms that help to reduce information asymmetry. Qualitative insights gained from in-depth interviews explain this finding by revealing how gig workers gain the necessary qualifications for their jobs, most importantly, through self-study, learning-by-doing, and trial-and-error processes. Our findings therefore point out that advanced educational credentials are only of limited use for gig workers

    Critical Competencies for the Innovativeness of Value Creation Champions : Identifying Challenges and Work-integrated Solutions

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    Medium-sized manufacturers of technical products with a high degree of in-house value adding activities – so-called value creation champions – are very important to the success of German industry and to safeguarding attractive jobs in Germany. Key to their success is their distinct innovativeness. The innovative capacities of these companies are increasingly under threat, especially as they are often based on the competencies of only few individual employees. Therefore, solutions are needed to first identify such critical competencies and then to develop new ways of work-integrated learning and knowledge exchange to develop respective capabilities. Based on current literature this paper first identifies the importance of four clusters of competencies, namely network competence, creative problem-solving competence, overview competence and integration competence, and explains under which conditions they should be rated as critical. This paper then proposes a five-step-process that enables companies to identify possible critical competencies and take suitable measures to avoid putting their innovativeness at risk

    Critical Competencies for the Innovativeness of Value Creation Champions: Identifying Challenges and Work-integrated Solutions

    No full text
    Medium-sized manufacturers of technical products with a high degree of in-house value adding activities – so-called value creation champions – are very important to the success of German industry and to safeguarding attractive jobs in Germany. Key to their success is their distinct innovativeness. The innovative capacities of these companies are increasingly under threat, especially as they are often based on the competencies of only few individual employees. Therefore, solutions are needed to first identify such critical competencies and then to develop new ways of work-integrated learning and knowledge exchange to develop respective capabilities. Based on current literature this paper first identifies the importance of four clusters of competencies, namely network competence, creative problem-solving competence, overview competence and integration competence, and explains under which conditions they should be rated as critical. This paper then proposes a five-step-process that enables companies to identify possible critical competencies and take suitable measures to avoid putting their innovativeness at risk

    The right kind of people : Characteristics of successful ideators' online behaviour

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    Open online idea calls are an increasingly popular way to crowdsource ideas. Such calls tend to attract a diverse crowd who suggest a variety of ideas. To detect the most promising from this mass of ideas, we identify online behavioural characteristics of successful ideators, i.e. those who suggest ideas that are implemented. Our study is based on binary logistic regression analyses of a dataset from a call for ideas crowdsourced by the city of Munich. We found that characteristics linked to suggesting possible solutions and to showing positive attention towards other ideas are key features of how successful ideators behave online. We also found that the first is a characteristic of ideators who are likely to suggest an idea that is implemented but not novel. The latter is a characteristic of ideators who are likely to suggest an idea that is implemented and novel. Paying attention to other ideas before suggesting one's own and providing constructive input to other ideas are not found to be characteristic for successful ideators. The findings contribute to a better understanding of successful ideators' online behaviour and thereby open up new opportunities for the detection of ideas that the idea-seeker wants to implement

    Underground Innovation: Missionary, User and Lifestyle projects

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    Underground innovation has been known to exist already for decades, but its full scope has not yet been mapped. Evidence from unconnected literatures (bootlegging, creative deviance, user innovation, open-source) suggest that multiple types of underground innovation exist, and not always done with organizational benefit as primary driver. We apply a mixed-method approach (interviews, surveys) in the context of a multinational organization concerned with R&D and product development. Three types of underground innovation are identified: missionary (marked by high diffusion persistency to change a company product or practice), user (initiated to solve personal problems at work) and lifestyle (driven by passion for innovation). Comparing these types we detect differences in objects of innovation, involvement of others, employed resources, and diffusion efforts. We discuss that underground innovation includes previously unconnected literatures, and emerges from employees driven by organizational adoption, personal use value, or benefits derived from the innovation process itself

    “We don't need no (higher) education” - How the gig economy challenges the education-income paradigm

    Get PDF
    The empirical relationship between educational attainment and pay levels has been widely acknowledged in the labour-economic and labour-sociology literatures. While the causalities underlying this relationship are not conclusively established, researchers broadly agree that higher educational attainment leads to higher income levels in dependent employment, temporary hiring, and freelancing alike. The ‘gig economy’, where workers complete jobs mediated by online platforms, challenges this paradigm as gig workers can access jobs without any educational certificates. Building a theoretical framework based on agency-driven accounts, we investigate whether we can empirically observe a relationship between educational attainment and wage levels in the gig economy. Our OLS regression analyses of 1607 gig workers in 14 Western economies illustrate no statistically significant correlation. Instead, the platform's review system as well as the gig workers' level of previous job experience serve as the major signalling mechanisms that help to reduce information asymmetry. Qualitative insights gained from in-depth interviews explain this finding by revealing how gig workers gain the necessary qualifications for their jobs, most importantly, through self-study, learning-by-doing, and trial-and-error processes. Our findings therefore point out that advanced educational credentials are only of limited use for gig workers.12213618

    Crowdsourcing ideas : Involving ordinary users in the ideation phase of new product development

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    The different roles of users in new product development (NPD) have been extensively described. Currently online idea crowdsourcing, via long-term open idea calls, is increasingly being used by companies to collect new product ideas from ordinary users. Such open idea calls can result in thousands of suggested ideas and detecting the ones that a company wants to implement can be problematic. Empirical research in this area is lacking. We therefore investigate which ideator and idea-related characteristics determine whether an idea for NPD is implemented by a crowdsourcing company. To answer this question, we use a cross-sectional research design to analyse publicly available data from an open idea call, run by an internationally active beverage producer. Our results reveal that ideators paying major attention to crowdsourced ideas of others, the idea popularity, as well as its potential innovativeness positively influence whether an idea is implemented by the crowdsourcing company. Counterintuitively, the motivation of an ideator, reflected in the number of ideas suggested, does not influence the likelihood of an idea being implemented

    Open innovation in nascent ventures: Does openness influence the speed of reaching critical milestones?

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    Research on open innovation (OI) has demonstrated the benefits of openness for firm innovation processes, but studies have mostly offered cross-sectional insights on incumbent firms. This study offers a more dynamic perspective on the relevance of OI for nascent ventures. Combining entrepreneurship and OI theories, we argue that it is key for resource-scarce nascent ventures to achieve critical venture-creation milestones. While OI can help these ventures to leverage salient external partnerships, we argue that it affects their speed of reaching these milestones. We test our hypotheses on a longitudinal sample focusing on external collaboration practices of nascent ventures in the renewable energy or information and communications technology industries. Our results show that, while engaging in R&D collaborations slows down nascent ventures’ product development and sustainable profit generation activities, joining industry associations does not have a slow-down effect. Our results complement the OI literature by warning about the downsides of openness for nascent ventures, particularly during the venture creation phase, where speed is a high priority
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