10 research outputs found

    A Program Evaluation Of High School Teachers’ Perceptions Of Implementing Tier I Instructional Practices Of A Multi-Tiered System Of Supports

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    The purpose of this program evaluation was to examine teachers’ perceptions of their current skills in implementing Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) interventions at one public charter school in Denver. The problem addressed in this study was the inhibiting conditions to implementing small-group instruction and Khan Academy interventions in the classroom. The findings of this study contribute to the existing literature on providing quality professional development training on MTSS programming to staff, offering ongoing instructional coaching and feedback to ensure data-driven instructional strategies, and protecting collaboration time for teachers by creating professional learning communities. This mixed methods study incorporated staff surveys and teacher interviews, which revealed staff perceiving themselves as having minimal skills in collecting different types of data and needing more substantial support in this area. Progress monitoring and formal data collection on student growth during small-group instructional interventions were found to be inconsistent. Time, student buy-in, and progress monitoring student learning were found to be barriers to successful implementation of small-group instruction. The interviewed teachers perceived the instructional videos and questions from Khan Academy as not always aligning with the ways in which they taught and assessed content knowledge. In addition, the Coronavirus pandemic made it more challenging for teachers to find time to implement Khan Academy in instruction. Consequently, the teachers used different online platforms that are better tailored to students’ instructional needs. The findings of this study may be used to inform and support high school building leaders in creating professional development trainings, ongoing coaching support, and collaboration days that better support teachers in implementing MTSS instructional interventions with fidelity. It is hoped that this will lead to more successful outcomes for high school students

    Bi-allelic Loss-of-Function CACNA1B Mutations in Progressive Epilepsy-Dyskinesia.

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    The occurrence of non-epileptic hyperkinetic movements in the context of developmental epileptic encephalopathies is an increasingly recognized phenomenon. Identification of causative mutations provides an important insight into common pathogenic mechanisms that cause both seizures and abnormal motor control. We report bi-allelic loss-of-function CACNA1B variants in six children from three unrelated families whose affected members present with a complex and progressive neurological syndrome. All affected individuals presented with epileptic encephalopathy, severe neurodevelopmental delay (often with regression), and a hyperkinetic movement disorder. Additional neurological features included postnatal microcephaly and hypotonia. Five children died in childhood or adolescence (mean age of death: 9 years), mainly as a result of secondary respiratory complications. CACNA1B encodes the pore-forming subunit of the pre-synaptic neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.2/N-type, crucial for SNARE-mediated neurotransmission, particularly in the early postnatal period. Bi-allelic loss-of-function variants in CACNA1B are predicted to cause disruption of Ca2+ influx, leading to impaired synaptic neurotransmission. The resultant effect on neuronal function is likely to be important in the development of involuntary movements and epilepsy. Overall, our findings provide further evidence for the key role of Cav2.2 in normal human neurodevelopment.MAK is funded by an NIHR Research Professorship and receives funding from the Wellcome Trust, Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital Charity, and Rosetrees Trust. E.M. received funding from the Rosetrees Trust (CD-A53) and Great Ormond Street Hospital Children's Charity. K.G. received funding from Temple Street Foundation. A.M. is funded by Great Ormond Street Hospital, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), and Biomedical Research Centre. F.L.R. and D.G. are funded by Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. K.C. and A.S.J. are funded by NIHR Bioresource for Rare Diseases. The DDD Study presents independent research commissioned by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund (grant number HICF-1009-003), a parallel funding partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (grant number WT098051). We acknowledge support from the UK Department of Health via the NIHR comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre award to Guy's and St. Thomas' National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in partnership with King's College London. This research was also supported by the NIHR Great Ormond Street Hospital Biomedical Research Centre. J.H.C. is in receipt of an NIHR Senior Investigator Award. The research team acknowledges the support of the NIHR through the Comprehensive Clinical Research Network. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, Department of Health, or Wellcome Trust. E.R.M. acknowledges support from NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, an NIHR Senior Investigator Award, and the University of Cambridge has received salary support in respect of E.R.M. from the NHS in the East of England through the Clinical Academic Reserve. I.E.S. is supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (Program Grant and Practitioner Fellowship)

    Faunal elements from the Deccan volcano-sedimentary sequences of India: A reappraisal of biostratigraphic, palaeoecologic, and palaeobiogeographic aspects

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    The Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP), India: A Review

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