4 research outputs found

    On the replacement of steel by NITINOL as coupling agent in automobile shaft

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    Automobile couplings generally fail due to excessive misalignment in shafts and torque overload which ultimately generates vibration in the assembly. These vibrations weaken the coupling structure and ultimately get transmitted to the shaft leading to fatigue failure. Additionally, the complexity in the design of standard coupling is related to lower durability. In this system, when the radial space is larger it trigger a bulkier transmission. Shape memory alloy such as NITINOL is a special class of smart material that possesses super-elasticity which means it can retain deformation of about 8%. This material has a high degree of strength, greater elastic and shear modulus than existing coupling materials such as steel, and have unique vibration damping features. Coupling made of NITINOL is simple in design and requires lesser space with minimal maintenance. They provide higher durability and are much reliable in operation over a wide range of temperatures. This paper aims to review the NITINOL material used in coupling technology industries and the parameters governing its shape memory effect. The knowledge gathered from this work enable to further extend the technological contribution of NiTi coupling at large scale production in the automobile sector with direct effect on longer life for the transmission system

    A Review on the Processing of Aero-Turbine Blade Using 3D Print Techniques

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    Additive manufacturing (AM) has proven to be the preferred process over traditional processes in a wide range of industries. This review article focused on the progressive development of aero-turbine blades from conventional manufacturing processes to the additive manufacturing process. AM is known as a 3D printing process involving rapid prototyping and a layer-by-layer construction process that can develop a turbine blade with a wide variety of options to modify the turbine blade design and reduce the cost and weight compared to the conventional production mode. This article describes various AM techniques suitable for manufacturing high-temperature turbine blades such as selective laser melting, selective laser sintering, electron beam melting, laser engineering net shaping, and electron beam free form fabrication. The associated parameters of AM such as particle size and shape, powder bed density, residual stresses, porosity, and roughness are discussed here

    3D-Printed Satellite Brackets: Materials, Manufacturing and Applications

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    Brackets are the load-bearing components in a satellite. The current age of satellites comprises specific brackets that set out as a link between the bodies of the satellite, reflector parts, and feeder facilities mounted at its upper end. Brackets are used to carry loads of the satellite body frame, supporting elements, batteries, and electronic goods. The article explicates the various brackets used in satellites and aircrafts. The strength of the bracket is of utmost importance since it is an important load supporting member in several assemblies of aircraft and satellites. In addition to the mechanical strength, the weight of the bracket is a major concern as it adds to the total weight of the aircraft and satellite. Thus, weight savings of brackets can be of paramount importance and Additive Manufacturing (AM) is found as an overall solution to achieve the same. Hence, in addition to various brackets used in satellites, the article presents an exhaustive review of the processing of various advanced functional materials using various AM techniques to make high strength-to-weight ratio satellite brackets. The use of DFAM by various satellite manufacturers globally for optimizing the structure of the brackets resulting in a significant weight saving of the brackets is also presented in the article

    3D-Printed Satellite Brackets: Materials, Manufacturing and Applications

    No full text
    Brackets are the load-bearing components in a satellite. The current age of satellites comprises specific brackets that set out as a link between the bodies of the satellite, reflector parts, and feeder facilities mounted at its upper end. Brackets are used to carry loads of the satellite body frame, supporting elements, batteries, and electronic goods. The article explicates the various brackets used in satellites and aircrafts. The strength of the bracket is of utmost importance since it is an important load supporting member in several assemblies of aircraft and satellites. In addition to the mechanical strength, the weight of the bracket is a major concern as it adds to the total weight of the aircraft and satellite. Thus, weight savings of brackets can be of paramount importance and Additive Manufacturing (AM) is found as an overall solution to achieve the same. Hence, in addition to various brackets used in satellites, the article presents an exhaustive review of the processing of various advanced functional materials using various AM techniques to make high strength-to-weight ratio satellite brackets. The use of DFAM by various satellite manufacturers globally for optimizing the structure of the brackets resulting in a significant weight saving of the brackets is also presented in the article
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