235 research outputs found

    Self-Regulated Learning: the essential factor for understanding and improving academic and clinical performance

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    There is increasing interest in the importance of Self-Regulated Learning for the improvement of academic and clinical performance. Self-Regulated Learning is a dynamic and cyclical metacognitive process that coordinates an individual’s skill (techniques) and will (motivation) to achieve a clearly defined task. There are differences in key Self-Regulated Learning processes between high and low performers, especially goal setting and self-monitoring. Formative feedback on the use of key Self-Regulated Learning processes, which can be identified using microanalysis before, during and after an individual performs a specific task, can lead to improved performance. There is increasing awareness of the importance of both the social and educational environment on the use of Self-Regulated Learning, including the essential influence of the teacher.O interesse sobre a importância da aprendizagem autorregulada para o desempenho acadêmico e clínico vem aumentando. A aprendizagem autorregulada é um processo cognitivo dinâmico e cíclico que integra a habili-dade e motivação do aluno para realizar uma tarefa definida. Existem diferenças importantes para o processo da aprendizagem autorregulada para alunos de baixo e alto desempenho, especialmente em relação ao estabelecimento de metas e ao automonitoramento. Feedback formativo nos processos chaves da aprendizagem autorregulada pode ser identificada utilizando a microanálise, antes, durante e depois da realização uma tarefa especifica pode melhorar o desempenho. Ainda, existe um aumento na percepção da importância da apren-dizagem autorregulada tanto no ambiente social quanto educacional, incluindo a importância do professor

    Teaching and learning evidence-based medicine: cross-sectional survey investigating knowledge and attitudes of teachers and learners in primary and secondary care

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    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important component of quality healthcare and a key part of the curriculum for doctors in training. There have been no previous studies comparing attitudes and knowledge of doctors in primary and secondary care towards EBM practice and teaching and this study sets out to investigate this area. We asked participants, a stratified sample of general practitioners, hospital consultants, GP registrars and junior hospital doctors in Leicester, Northamptonshire and Rutland, UK, to complete a self-administered survey questionnaire and written knowledge test which provided ‘positive to evidence based practice’ (PEP) attitude scores and Manchester Short EBM Questionnaire Education for Primary Care (2007) 18: 45–57 # 2007 Radcliffe Publishing Limited WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN IN THIS AREA. There is little evidence on the relationship between attitudes and knowledge in relation to evidence-based medicine (EBM) in family doctors, consultants and doctors intraining. WHAT THIS WORK ADDS. This study showed that, although general practitioners and general practitioner trainers were significantly less positive in attitude to EBM compared to GP registrars, junior hospital doctors and consultant respondents, they had significantly higher knowledge scores. This study demonstrated that the attitude (PEP) score and knowledge questionnaire(MANSEBMQ) have high reliability but require further research to demonstrate validity. SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH. There remain opportunities for refinement of the MANSEBMQ, validation against existing tools and further application in a larger study, including assessment of EBM knowledge and skills, before and after an educational process, involving students in clinically relevant and integrated EBM learning. Keywords: attitudes, evidence-based practice, general practice registrars, general practitioners, hospital doctors, primary care, secondary care(MANSEBMQ) knowledge scores of participants. The response rate was low which may have led to volunteer bias but there were sufficient responses to explore attitude scores and knowledge scores. Attitude(PEP) scores were highest in hospital consultants, intermediate in doctors in training and lowest in general practitioner (GP)respondents (mean score 71.7 vs 70.5 vs 67.2; P = 0.006). PEP scores were also highest in respondents with higher degrees (MD, PhD, MSc), intermediate in those with higher professional qualifications (MRCP, FRCS, MRCGP or equivalent) and lowest in those with none of these (mean score 72.9 vs 70.6 vs 67.2; P = 0.005). PEP scores were significantly higher(P = 0.002) in respondents who taught EBM (mean score 71.7, 95% CI 70.3 to 73.2, n=109, missing=5) compared with those who did not (mean score 68.6, 95% CI 67.3 to 69.9, n = 105, missing = 12) and in respondents with research experience (P < 0.001), research training (P < 0.001) and training in EBM (P = 0.001). There was a positive correlation between PEP score and MANSEBMQ score (P = 0.013). In contrast, and paradoxically opposite to the pattern of attitudes, knowledge scores were highest in GPs, intermediate in junior hospital doctors and lowest in consultant respondents (mean score 63.5 vs 61.9 vs 54.5, P=0.005). Although GPs and GP trainers were significantly less positive in attitude to EBM compared to GP registrars, junior hospital doctors and consultant respondents, they had significantly higher knowledge scores. This study demonstrated that the attitude(PEP) score and knowledge questionnaire (MANSEBMQ) have good reliability but require further research to demonstrate validity

    The challenge of online learning for medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic

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    The global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on education systems across the world has led to major and rapid changes in the provision of higher and medical education, with increasing delivery of the curriculum by online approaches. A recent synthesis of the global responses by universities to the COVID-19 pandemic noted that the majority of universities were using online learning, but with differences between countries in the rapidity and extent of the shift.1 These differences were attributed to the available resources, which included previous experience of using online learning and the availability of technology. However, the authors also noted that there were similar differences within countries and they highlighted that the current and urgent challenge for all universities was to ensure that the educational potential of online learning was optimised in each university. This is an important message that is also highly relevant to all medical education providers, from basic (undergraduate) to postgraduate and continuing. The editorial highlights the importance of iteratively designing online learning to ensure that the development, delivery and implementation of online learning are optimised to a specific local context. In addition, the editorial discusses the importance of medical educators sharing their approaches in designing online learning

    Clearing the confusion about self-directed learning and self-regulated learning

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    Self-Directed Learning (SDL) and SelfRegulated Learning (SRL) are often used without a clear distinction, leading to confusion in understanding and the use of inappropriate measurement tools. SDL is a general approach to learning and can be identified using ‘aptitude’ questionnaires but SRL is a dynamic and context specific learning process and requires ‘event’ measures, such as microanalysis. These differences have implications for research and remediation

    Using Technology to Nurture Core Human Values in Healthcare

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    A vision of the use of technology in medical education after the COVID-19 pandemic

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