26 research outputs found

    Odds ratios (95% CI) for the cross-sectional association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms (GDS>β€Š=β€Š8) at baseline (nβ€Š=β€Š2,902).

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    1<p>Test for trend was examined by entering dietary pattern score quartiles as a fixed factor and testing the contrast by using the polynomial option in all models.</p>2<p>Model 1: adjusted for age, sex and daily energy intake.</p>3<p>Model 2: further adjusted for BMI, PASE, number of IADLs, smoking status, alcohol use, education and marital status.</p>4<p>Model 3: further adjusted for self-reported history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease and stroke, and CSI-D score.</p

    Number of subjects included and excluded for baseline and 4-year follow-up analyses.

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    <p>Number of subjects included and excluded for baseline and 4-year follow-up analyses.</p

    Subject characteristics by baseline depressive status (nβ€Š=β€Š2,902).

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    1<p>Differences between groups were assessed by independent <i>t</i> test or chi square test.</p

    Food group factor loading<sup>a</sup> for three dietary patterns.

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    a<p>Factor loadings with absolute value β‰₯0.2 are shown in bold (Field 2005). For food group loads more than one dietary pattern, only the highest absolute value of loading is bolded.</p

    Odds ratios (95% CI) for the longitudinal association between baseline dietary patterns and 4-year incidence of depressive symptoms (GDS>β€Š=β€Š8) (nβ€Š=β€Š2,211).

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    1<p>Test for trend was examined by entering dietary pattern score quartiles as a fixed factor and testing the contrast by using the polynomial option in all models.</p>2<p>Model 1: adjusted for age, sex and daily energy intake at baseline.</p>3<p>Model 2: further adjusted for BMI, PASE, number of IADLs, smoking status, alcohol use, education and marital status at baseline.</p>4<p>Model 3: further adjusted for self-reported history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart disease and stroke, and CSI-D score at baseline.</p

    Selected baseline characteristics of study participants by mortality status.

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    <p><sup>1</sup> Adjusted for mean total energy intake (2096 kcal for men, 1579 for women) using the residual method. The quartiles values of energy adjusted calcium intake were <u><</u>458, >458 to <u><</u>584, >584 to <u><</u>762 and >762 mg/day for men, and <u><</u>417, >417 to <u><</u>529, >529 to <u><</u>688 and >688 mg/day for women.</p><p><sup>2</sup> 2 participants with missing data</p

    HRs and 95% CIs for all-cause and CVD mortality by use of calcium supplement.

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    <p><sup>1</sup> Adjusted for quartiles of dietary energy adjusted calcium intake with mean total energy intake (2096 kcal for men, 1579 for women) using the residual method. The quartiles values of energy adjusted calcium intake were <u><</u>458, >458 to <u><</u>584, >584 to <u><</u>762 and >762 mg/day for men, and <u><</u>417, >417 to <u><</u>529, >529 to <u><</u>688 and >688 mg/day for women.</p><p><sup>2</sup> Further adjusted for age and sex</p><p><sup>3</sup> Further adjusted for BMI, PASE, smoking status, alcohol use, education level, self-reported history of diabetes and hypertension, percentage of energy from total fat, percentage of energy from saturated fat</p

    HRs and 95% CIs for all-cause and CVD mortality by quartiles of energy adjusted dietary calcium intake stratified by calcium supplemental use.

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    <p><sup>1</sup> Adjusted for mean total energy intake (2096 kcal for men, 1579 for women) using the residual method. The quartiles values of energy adjusted calcium intake were <u><</u>458, >458 to <u><</u>584, >584 to <u><</u>762 and >762 mg/day for men, and <u><</u>417, >417 to <u><</u>529, >529 to <u><</u>688 and >688 mg/day for women.</p><p><sup>2</sup> Adjusted for age and sex</p><p><sup>3</sup> Further adjusted for BMI, PASE, smoking status, alcohol use, education level, self-reported history of diabetes and hypertension, percentage of energy from total fat, percentage of energy from saturated fat</p

    HRs and 95% CIs for all-cause and CVD mortality by quartiles of energy adjusted dietary calcium intake.

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    <p><sup>1</sup> Adjusted for mean total energy intake (2096 kcal for men, 1579 for women) using the residual method. The quartiles values of energy adjusted calcium intake were <u><</u>458, >458 to <u><</u>584, >584 to <u><</u>762 and >762 mg/day for men, and <u><</u>417, >417 to <u><</u>529, >529 to <u><</u>688 and >688 mg/day for women.</p><p><sup>2</sup> Adjusted for age and sex</p><p><sup>3</sup> Further adjusted for BMI, PASE, smoking status, alcohol use, education level, self-reported history of diabetes and hypertension, energy intake, percentage of energy from total fat, percentage of energy from saturated fat, and calcium supplemental use</p

    Additional file 1: of Diet quality is inversely associated with obesity in Chinese adults with type 2 diabetes

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    Table S1. Scoring criteria of the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010)a. Table S2. Scoring criteria of the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I)a. Table S3. Scoring criteria of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)a score. (DOCX 26 kb
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