88 research outputs found

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A levels in term neonates

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    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) plays an integral role in physiological and pathophysiological angiogenesis and has increasingly been implicated in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm infants. Application of intravitreal anti-VEGF is frequently used to treat ROP with little consideration given to the role of VEGF-A in neonatal growth and development. Previous studies have demonstrated systemic anti-VEGF persistence, reduced peripheral VEGF levels following treatment, and possible diagnostic and prognostic uses for VEGF-A determination. This study seeks to determine a normal range for serum VEGF-A (sVEGF-A) in healthy,term infants. The sVEGF-A levels were obtained from 32 neonates born at term infants (16 males and 16 females) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No significant correlations were found between sVEGF-A levels and time of sample collection, birth weight, or gender. The median sVEGF-A level was 976 (394–1635) pg/mL (95% confidence interval for median: 496–1,318 pg/mL). This preliminary study determines a normal range for the sVEGF-A level in healthy, term neonates. This normal range will provide a tool to assist in the diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of treatment of infants with ROP

    Cervical cancer in southern Malawi: A prospective analysis of presentation, management, and outcomes

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    Background: Malawi has the highest age standardised rate of cervical cancer in the world. This study describes the presentation, management and short-term outcomes of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), in Southern Malawi.Methods: All patients with a new diagnosis of cervical cancer presenting to QECH between 1st January-1st July 2015 had demographic data, referral pathway, stage, histology and management prospectively recorded at presentation, and at two months after initial presentation.Results: 310 women presented with cervical cancer to QECH and 300 were included (mean age 44.9 years; HIV 47%), representing 8% of the estimated annual number of new presentations in Malawi. Mean age of patients with HIV was 6.9 years younger compared to those without HIV (p<0.05). 132 (44%) patients had stage 1 cervical cancer and 168 (56%) presented with more advanced disease (stage II-IV). There was a mean delay of 23.1 weeks between onset of symptoms and being seen by a clinician and a further 19 weeks before attending QECH. Most common management plans at initial consultation were: same day biopsy (n=112, 37.3%);, booking for curative surgery (n=76, 25.3%);, and referral to palliative care (n=93, 31%). At 2 months, 64 (57%) biopsies were reported, 31 (40.8%) operations were completed and 27 (29%) patients had attended the palliative clinic.Conclusions: Patients presenting with cervical cancer to QECH were young, with a high prevalence of HIV, and late stage disease. The lack of pathological and surgical capacity and the absence of radiotherapy severely limited the possibility of curative treatment. Access to quality palliative care remains an important component of management in low resource settings. Improving awareness of cervical cancer in the community, and better recognition and management within the health service, are important in reducing the cancer burden for women in Malawi

    WT1 and its transcriptional cofactor BASP1 redirect the differentiation pathway of an established blood cell line

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    The Wilms' tumour suppressor WT1 (Wilms' tumour 1) is a transcriptional regulator that plays a central role in organogenesis, and is mutated or aberrantly expressed in several childhood and adult malignancies. We previously identified BASP1 (brain acid-soluble protein 1) as a WT1 cofactor that suppresses the transcriptional activation function of WT1. In the present study we have analysed the dynamic between WT1 and BASP1 in the regulation of gene expression in myelogenous leukaemia K562 cells. Our findings reveal that BASP1 is a significant regulator of WT1 that is recruited to WT1-binding sites and suppresses WT1-mediated transcriptional activation at several WT1 target genes. We find that WT1 and BASP1 can divert the differentiation programme of K562 cells to a non-blood cell type following induction by the phorbol ester PMA. WT1 and BASP1 co-operate to induce the differentiation of K562 cells to a neuronal-like morphology that exhibits extensive arborization, and the expression of several genes involved in neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Functional analysis revealed the relevance of the transcriptional reprogramming and morphological changes, in that the cells elicited a response to the neurotransmitter ATP. Taken together, the results of the present study reveal that WT1 and BASP1 can divert the lineage potential of an established blood cell line towards a cell with neuronal characteristics

    The Strayed Reveller, No. 1

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    The Strayed Reveller is a literary magazine of stories, songs, poems, essays, reviews and artwork by students at Stephen F. Austin State University. It is published monthly andsponsered by the School of Liberal Arts and Department of English.https://scholarworks.sfasu.edu/reveller/1000/thumbnail.jp

    WT1 and its transcriptional cofactor BASP1 redirect the differentiation pathway of an established blood cell line

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    The Wilms' tumour suppressor WT1 (Wilms' tumour 1) is a transcriptional regulator that plays a central role in organogenesis, and is mutated or aberrantly expressed in several childhood and adult malignancies. We previously identified BASP1 (brain acid-soluble protein 1) as a WT1 cofactor that suppresses the transcriptional activation function of WT1. In the present study we have analysed the dynamic between WT1 and BASP1 in the regulation of gene expression in myelogenous leukaemia K562 cells. Our findings reveal that BASP1 is a significant regulator of WT1 that is recruited to WT1-binding sites and suppresses WT1-mediated transcriptional activation at several WT1 target genes. We find that WT1 and BASP1 can divert the differentiation programme of K562 cells to a non-blood cell type following induction by the phorbol ester PMA. WT1 and BASP1 co-operate to induce the differentiation of K562 cells to a neuronal-like morphology that exhibits extensive arborization, and the expression of several genes involved in neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Functional analysis revealed the relevance of the transcriptional reprogramming and morphological changes, in that the cells elicited a response to the neurotransmitter ATP. Taken together, the results of the present study reveal that WT1 and BASP1 can divert the lineage potential of an established blood cell line towards a cell with neuronal characteristics

    The Strayed Reveller, No. 5

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    The fifth issue of The Strayed Reveller.https://scholarworks.sfasu.edu/reveller/1004/thumbnail.jp

    The Strayed Reveller, No. 8

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    The eighth issue of The Strayed Reveller.https://scholarworks.sfasu.edu/reveller/1007/thumbnail.jp

    Readability estimates for commonly used health-related quality of life surveys

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    To estimate readability of seven commonly used health-related quality of life instruments: SF-36, HUI, EQ-5D, QWB-SA, HALex, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ), and the NEI-VFQ-25. The Flesch–Kincaid (F–K) and Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) formulae were used to estimate readability for every item in each measure. The percentage of items that require more than 5 years of formal schooling according to F–K was 50 for the EQ-5D, 53 for the SF-36, 80 for the VFQ-25, 85 for the QWB-SA, 100 for the HUI, HALex, and the MLHFQ. The percentage of items deemed harder than “easy” according to FRE was 50 for the SF-36, 67 for the EQ-5D, 79 for the QWB-SA, 80 for the VFQ-25, 100 for the HUI, HALex, and the MLHFQ. All seven surveys have a substantial number of items with high readability levels that may not be appropriate for the general population

    Future oriented group training for suicidal patients: a randomized clinical trial

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    <p>Abstract</p> <p>Background</p> <p>In routine psychiatric treatment most clinicians inquire about indicators of suicide risk, but once the risk is assessed not many clinicians systematically focus on suicidal thoughts. This may reflect a commonly held opinion that once the depressive or anxious symptoms are effectively treated the suicidal symptoms will wane. Consequently, many clients with suicidal thoughts do not receive systematic treatment of their suicidal thinking. There are many indications that specific attention to suicidal thinking is necessary to effectively decrease the intensity and recurrence of suicidal thinking. We therefore developed a group training for patients with suicidal thoughts that is easy to apply in clinical settings as an addition to regular treatment and that explicitly focuses on suicidal thinking. We hypothesize that such an additional training will decrease the frequency and intensity of suicidal thinking.</p> <p>We based the training on cognitive behavioural approaches of hopelessness, worrying, and future perspectives, given the theories of Beck, McLeod and others, concerning the lack of positive expectations characteristic for many suicidal patients. In collaboration with each participant in the training individual positive future possibilities and goals were challenged.</p> <p>Methods/Design</p> <p>We evaluate the effects of our program on suicide ideation (primary outcome measure). The study is conducted in a regular treatment setting with regular inpatients and outpatients representative for Dutch psychiatric treatment settings. The design is a RCT with two arms: TAU (Treatment as Usual) versus TAU plus the training. Follow up measurements are taken 12 months after the first assessment.</p> <p>Discussion</p> <p>There is a need for research on the effectiveness of interventions in suicidology, especially RCT's. In our treatment program we combine aspects and interventions that have been proven to be useful in the treatment of suicidal thinking and behavior.</p> <p>Trial registration</p> <p>ISRCTN56421759</p
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