446 research outputs found

    Musical Life in Edwardian Potton

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    This talk (with musical examples) features the contributions of the Robart & Stapley families to the musical life of our town as well as their involvement with British & South African variety theatre and music making in rural Ontario

    Exploring place through user-generated content: Using Flickr tags to describe city cores

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    Terms used to describe city centers, such as Downtown, are key concepts in everyday or vernacular language. Here, we explore such language by harvesting georeferenced and tagged metadata associated with 8 million Flickr images and thus consider how large numbers of people name city core areas. The nature of errors and imprecision in tagging and georeferencing are quantified, and automatically generated precision measures appear to mirror errors in the positioning of images. Users seek to ascribe appropriate semantics to images, though bulk-uploading and bulk-tagging may introduce bias. Between 0.5--2% of tags associated with georeferenced images analyzed describe city core areas generically, while 70% of all georeferenced images analyzed include specific place name tags, with place names at the granularity of city names being by far the most common. Using Flickr metadata, it is possible not only to describe the use of the term Downtown across the USA, but also to explore the borders of city center neighborhoods at the level of individual cities, whilst accounting for bias by the use of tag profiles

    Editorial

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    Where to improve cycling infrastructure? Assessing bicycle suitability and bikeability with open data in the city of Paris

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    This study proposes a method that can help in identifying potential locations for improvements of cycling infrastructures. It addresses the need for simple and effective methods to support decision-making in bicycle planning. The city of Paris is used as a case study area because it has made considerable efforts to improve cycling infrastructures and to become more bicycle-friendly in recent years. The method (1) identifies potential locations for improvements of bicycle infrastructures on a street level and (2) on a city level considering accessibility to important destinations. The main data used in this project is street data from OpenStreetMap (OSM) and cycling infrastructure data from the Atelier parisien d’urbanisme (Apur). The proposed method can be applied with commonly available data, has clear outcomes, is reproducible, and can be applied to different case study areas. We produced a map of bicycle suitability across all of Paris, and validated it for the 30 longest segments in the city with lower bike suitability. Our validation showed that combining OSM and Apur data led to a reliable dataset, with which we modelled bikeability using the underlying network overlain on a 250 m resolution grid and destinations representing leisure activities, education, shopping, city functions and public transport. The resulting map identifies regions of the city with poor bikeability, where improvements to cycling infrastructure should be investigated

    A Geographical Analysis of Canadian Students Taking Independent Music Lessons: The Rural Experience

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    The engagement of students taking private music lessons is affected by a range of factors, one of which is the geographic location of the student’s family. This is a geographical analysis of 6,500 questionnaire responses completed by Canadian music teachers, students, and parents, including 819 responses (12.6%) from participants living in ‘rural’ areas, as defined by Statistics Canada. Participants’ home locations were categorized on a five-point ordinal scale from ‘rural’ to ‘very large urban population center’, data-matched with further geospatial data relating to deprivation and road distances, and assessed for strength and direction of association with questionnaire items. Results revealed that students living in more rural areas performed more regularly than those in more urban areas, with parents and teachers in more rural areas taking greater part in collective music making events. Whilst they derived a smaller proportion of their household income from music, teachers in more rural areas garnered greater respect from parents. Parents also reported increasing pleasure in children’s musical progress as population centers decreased in size. The results offer tentative support to the view that in more rural situations, where there are potentially fewer students and teachers, closer intergenerational bonds are possible, and more aspects of private music lessons might reflect locally-valued traditions and resources

    Effects of traffic perturbations on bike sharing demand – a case study of public transport strikes and protests in Paris

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    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the interactions between traffic perturbations and bike sharing use. More specifically we propose a framework for comparative spatial temporal analyses of public transport strikes and massive protests effects on bike sharing program in Paris. We find opposite effects on bike sharing demand due to public transport strikes and protests. The former causes a considerable rise in bike sharing demand particularly during the daily rush hours, while the latter precipitates a drop of activity constantly during the protest day. Our approach allows tracing bike sharing demand changes induced by traffic perturbations on an hourly level

    Variable-resolution Compression of Vector Data

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    The compression of spatial data is a promising solution to reduce the space of data storage and to decrease the transmission time of spatial data over the Internet. This paper proposes a new method for variable-resolution compression of vector data. Three key steps are encompassed in the proposed method, namely, the simplification of vector data via the elimination of vertices, the compression of removed vertices, and the decoding of the compressed vector data. The proposed compression method was implemented and applied to compress vector data to investigate its performance in terms of the compression ratio, distortions of geometric shapes. The results show that the proposed method provides a feasible and efficient solution for the compression of vector data, is able to achieve good compression ratios and maintains the main shape characteristics of the spatial objects within the compressed vector dat

    Introduction : The trouble with forest: Definitions, values and boundaries

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    Acknowledgements. We are grateful to the anonymous reviewers for their constructive and thoughtful comments on a draft version of this paper. We would also like to thank the participants at the workshop in Stels on “the trouble with defining forest: semantics, ontology, territoriality” in June 2016 for their comments and discussions that contributed to the ideas in this paper. Any errors in this paper remain of course our own.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    JOSIS\u27 10th anniversary special feature: part two

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    Window Expeditions: A playful approach to crowdsourcing natural language descriptions of everyday lived landscapes

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    Measuring what citizens perceive and value about landscapes is important for landscape monitoring. Capturing temporal, spatial and cultural variation requires collection of data at scale. One potential proxy data source are textual descriptions of landscapes written by volunteers. We implemented a gamified application and crowdsourced a multilingual corpus of in-situ descriptions of everyday lived landscapes. Our implementation focused on the aesthetics of exploration, expression and fellowship in the mechanics, dynamics, aesthetics (MDA) framework. We collected 503 natural language landscape descriptions from 384 participants in English (69.7%), German (25.1%) and French (5.3%) and most contributions were made in urban areas (54.7%). The most frequent noun lemma in English was “tree” and in German “Fenster” (window). By comparing our English collection to corpora of everyday English and landscape descriptions, we identified frequent lemmas such as “tree”, “window”, “light”, “street”, “garden” and “sky” which occurred significantly more than expected. These terms hint as to important components of the everyday landscapes of our users. We suggest a number of ways in which our corpus could be used in ongoing research on landscapes, complementing existing PPGIS approaches, providing data for domain specific lexicons for landscape analysis and as an input to landscape character assessment
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