5,050 research outputs found

    STARGATE : Static Repository Gateway and Toolkit. Final Project Report

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    STARGATE (Static Repository Gateway and Toolkit) was funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and is intended to demonstrate the ease of use of the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) Static Repository technology, and the potential benefits offered to publishers in making their metadata available in this way This technology offers a simpler method of participating in many information discovery services than creating fully-fledged OAI-compliant repositories. It does this by allowing the infrastructure and technical support required to participate in OAI-based services to be shifted from the data provider (the journal) to a third party and allows a single third party gateway provider to provide intermediation for many data providers (journals). Specifically, STARGATE has created a series of Static Repositories of publisher metadata provided by a selection of Library and Information Science journals. It has demonstrated the interoperability of these repositories by exposing their metadata via a Static Repository Gateway for harvesting and cross-searching by external service providers. The project has conducted a critical evaluation of the Static Repository approach in conjunction with the participating publishers and service providers. The technology works. The project has demonstrated that Static Repositories are easy to create and that the differences between fully-fledged and static OAI Repositories have no impact on the participation of small journal publishers in OAI-based services. The problems for a service that arise out of the use of Static Repositories are parallel to those created by any other repository dealing with journal articles. Problems arise from the diversity of metadata element sets provided by a given journal and the lack of specific metadata elements for the articles' volume and issue details. Another issue for the use of publishers' metadata arise as the collection policies of some existing services only allow Open Access materials to be included in them. The project recommends that the use of Static Repositories continues to be explored - in particular as a flexible way to expose existing sets of structured information to OAI services and to create the opportunity to enhance the metadata as part of the process. The project further recommends that the publishing community consider the creation or adoption of an application profile for journal articles to support information discovery that can search by volume and issue. Significant further use of the Static Repository technology by small journal publishers will require the future creation and maintenance of a community-specific Static Repository Gateway. Further use will also require advocacy within the publishing community but might initially be most effectively kick-started through the creation of OAI repositories based on metadata held by the commercial services which publish or mediate access to electronic copies of journals on behalf of small publishers

    Metadata quality : implications for library and information science professionals

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    Purpose - In contrast with recent studies noting the necessity of library and information science (LIS) skills in digital library and repository projects, this study aims to examine the impact of metadata quality requirements on how LIS professionals apply their skills outside a library setting. Design/methodology/approach - The paper reviews the concept of metadata quality and examines the implications of this for LIS professionals by reviewing the differences between the context of the library community and other relevant communities of practice. Findings - The paper argues that, although much needed, LIS skills require contextualisation before application outside library settings. Research limitations/implications - Many of the new opportunities for and settings of LIS skills are immature - consequently this analysis may date as the context of these settings mature. Current trends, however, suggest that it will not. Practical implications - Training in LIS skills should take account of how they might apply differently outside libraries. Librarians co-operating with colleagues outside the library should appreciate the potential metadata 'compromises' they might have to make and why they are necessary. Originality/value - The paper provides food for thought on the increasing number of LIS professionals working outside library settings

    Digital preservation in the Tertiary education sector : management implications

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    This paper assesses the future of long-term curation and preservation of digital assets with particular reference to Further Education (FE) in the UK. Reviews current requirements of digital preservation and the efforts underway to support them. Drawing on other recent work and the author's experience in a recent development project it subsequently comments on these efforts in the context of FE. Argues that the long-term curation and preservation of digital assets produced by further education colleges should not be the responsibility of those colleges

    Metadata

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    Comparative Review of Diane I. Hillmann and Elaine L Westbrooks & American Library Association (2004) Metadata in practice; David Haynes (2004) Metadata for information management and retrieval; Priscilla Caplan (2003) Metadata fundamentals for all librarian

    Optimising metadata workflows in a distributed information environment

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    The different purposes present within a distributed information environment create the potential for repositories to enhance their metadata by capitalising on the diversity of metadata available for any given object. This paper presents three conceptual reference models required to achieve this optimisation of metadata workflow: the ecology of repositories, the object lifecycle model, and the metadata lifecycle model. It suggests a methodology for developing the metadata lifecycle model, and illustrates how it might be used to enhance metadata within a network of repositories and services

    Resolving the liquidity effect.

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    Liquidity (Economics)

    The repository ecology : an approach to understanding repository and service interactions

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    An increasing number of university institutions and other organisations are deciding to deploy repositories and a growing number of formal and informal distributed services are supporting or capitalising on the information these repositories provide. Despite reasonably well understood technical architectures, early majority adopters may struggle to articulate their place within the actualities of a wider information environment. The idea of a repository ecology provides developers and administrators with a useful way of articulating and analysing their place in the information environment, and the technical and organisational interactions they have, or are developing, with other parts of such an environment. This presentation will provide an overview of the concept of a repository ecology and examine some examples from the domains of scholarly communications and elearning

    An easy option? OAI static repositories as a method of exposing publishers' metadata to the information environment

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    This paper introduces OAI static repository technology as a method by which publishers can expose their article-level metadata and thereby participate more fully in the wider information environment. It begins by discussing the value of exposing metadata via OAI and the potential role that static repositories might play in lowering the barriers to achieving this, and reports on the progress of a study which is evaluating the applicability and effectiveness of the static repositories approach

    Climate dynamics experiments using a GCM simulations

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    The study of surface-atmosphere interactions has begun with studies of the effect of altering the ocean and land boundaries. A ten year simulation of global climate using observed sea surface temperature anomalies has begun using the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM1). The results for low resolution (R15) were computed for the first 8 years of the simulation and compared with the observed surface temperatures and the MSU (Microwave Sounding Unit) observations of tropospheric temperature. A simulation at higher resolution (T42) was done to ascertain the effect of interactive soil hydrology on the system response to an El Nino sea surface temperature perturbation. Initial analysis of this simulations was completed
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