1,707 research outputs found

    Defamation, Privacy and the First Amendment

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    Topological finiteness properties of monoids. Part 1: Foundations

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    We initiate the study of higher dimensional topological finiteness properties of monoids. This is done by developing the theory of monoids acting on CW complexes. For this we establish the foundations of MM-equivariant homotopy theory where MM is a discrete monoid. For projective MM-CW complexes we prove several fundamental results such as the homotopy extension and lifting property, which we use to prove the MM-equivariant Whitehead theorems. We define a left equivariant classifying space as a contractible projective MM-CW complex. We prove that such a space is unique up to MM-homotopy equivalence and give a canonical model for such a space via the nerve of the right Cayley graph category of the monoid. The topological finiteness conditions left-Fn\mathrm{F}_n and left geometric dimension are then defined for monoids in terms of existence of a left equivariant classifying space satisfying appropriate finiteness properties. We also introduce the bilateral notion of MM-equivariant classifying space, proving uniqueness and giving a canonical model via the nerve of the two-sided Cayley graph category, and we define the associated finiteness properties bi-Fn\mathrm{F}_n and geometric dimension. We explore the connections between all of the these topological finiteness properties and several well-studied homological finiteness properties of monoids which are important in the theory of string rewriting systems, including FPn\mathrm{FP}_n, cohomological dimension, and Hochschild cohomological dimension. We also develop the corresponding theory of MM-equivariant collapsing schemes (that is, MM-equivariant discrete Morse theory), and among other things apply it to give topological proofs of results of Anick, Squier and Kobayashi that monoids which admit presentations by complete rewriting systems are left-, right- and bi-FP‚ąě\mathrm{FP}_\infty.Comment: 59 pages, 1 figur

    An occurrence of the Robinson-Schensted correspondence

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    Injunctions-Unjust Restraint on Entertainers in California

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    A Technique for Increasing the Sensitivity of a Solid-State Fission Probe

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    A small silicon p-n junction wafer, when coated with uranium 235, can be used as a compact fission probe for low power flux and power mapping. Because of the inverse relation between the magnitude of a neutron-induced fission pulse and the inherent capacitance of the detecting element (capacitance is proportional to area), the size, and hence the sensitivity, of the semiconductor detector has been limited. New developments in the field of semiconductor detectors have made it possible to fabricate large area detectors which are essentially free from the capacitance effect. However, preliminary results indicate that they are much more susceptible to radiation damage than the detectors described in this report and as such may not be suitable for flux mapping. increasing the sensitivity cannot be accomplished by simply fabricating a larger detector. It has been observed that by combining the silicon p-n junction wafers in a series configuration the capacitance effect can be bypassed, and a fission probe can be made with a resultant increase in sensitivity by a factor of ten while sustaining only a minor decrease in pulse height. Analysis further indicates that for n silicon wafers in series, if n(C(sub i)) + C(sub c)/C(sub b) less than 0.1 where C(sub i) and C(sub c) are the preamplifier input and cable capacitances, respectively, and C(sub b) is the junction capacitance of a single silicon wafer, there should be no substantial reduction in pulse height due to series circuitry

    Growth of Tobacco Seedlings with Nitrate and its Reduction Products

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    Telepsychiatry: The Evaluation and Treatment of Seniors in Rural Retirement Communities

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    Few studies examine the benefits from geriatric telepsychiatry in rural retirement communities. Objectives: 1. To demonstrate that using telepsychiatry a) standard approaches to psychiatric evaluation would yield diagnoses in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V); b. psychotherapies and pharmacotherapy could be effectively administered.  2. To examine the relationships among cognition, mood, agitation and functions at baseline and the response to treatment over time. Design: Prospective longitudinal study. Measures: Geriatric Depression scale (GDS), Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), Barthel Index (BI), Pittsburgh Agitation Scale (PAS).  Setting: Video Teleconferencing.  Interventions: Psychotherapy, psychopharmacology. Participants: 428 Seniors over 55, met criteria for at least one DSM-V diagnosis. Results: Treatments were administered for a full range of psychiatric diagnoses and age-related medical conditions.  The most frequently prescribed pharmacological agents were: antidepressants (78%) antipsychotics (64%), memory enhancers (38%).   Participants (66%) received psychotherapy: individual (31%), couple (7%), family (13%). Variation in the MMSE scores were observed: 55% remained stable, 11% declined, 18% improved. GDS Scores improved from baseline to 26 weeks (p=0.02, d=0.99: 95% CI 0.39-1.56). PAS scores declined from baseline to 52 weeks  (McNemar’s S= 11.27, p=0.0008, d=1.17: 95% CI 0.63-1.68).   Function (BI) at week 26 was not statistically significantly different from baseline (t(26)=1.66, p=0.11, d=0.65: 95%CI -0.16-1.42). Participants maintained independence (64.5%) at 52 weeks  (McNemar’s S = 6.23, p=0.013, d=0.79: 95%CI 0.19-1.36) Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility and benefit of providing a full complement of services via telepsychiatry to seniors and provides a rationale for more comprehensive reimbursement plans .
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