310 research outputs found

    An Experience report on using DAML-S

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    Though DAML-S is growing into a de facto standard for semantic webservice markup, we have only found few complete service descriptions and even less papers discussing technical issues about the markup process. We addressed this lack by (1) reporting on our experiences in describing a set of services, (2) concluding several limitations of the latest DAML-S version (v0.7) and (3) making our work accessible to the research community1

    An investigation of the role of background music in IVWs for learning

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    Empirical evidence is needed to corroborate the intuitions of gamers and game developers in understanding the benefits of Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs) as a learning environment and the role that music plays within these environments. We report an investigation to determine if background music of the genre typically found in computer‐based role‐playing games has an effect on learning in a computer‐animated history lesson about the Macquarie Lighthouse within an IVW. In Experiment 1, music stimuli were created from four different computer game soundtracks. Seventy‐two undergraduate students watched the presentation and completed a survey including biographical details, questions on the historical material presented and questions relating to their perceived level of immersion. While the tempo and pitch of the music was unrelated to learning, music conditions resulted in a higher number of accurately remembered facts than the no music condition. One soundtrack showed a statistically significant improvement in memorisation of facts over other music conditions. Also an interaction between the levels of perceived immersion and ability to accurately remember facts was observed. Experiment 2, involving 48 undergraduate students, further investigated the effect of music, sense of immersion and how different display systems affect memory for facts

    Slack-enabled innovation versus problemistic search: Findings from case studies among SME

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    Multiculturalism is one of the many factors contributing to the growing diversity found within the workforce comprising today’s organizations. This is particularly true in the ICT workplace. Diversity is often investigated in the context of teams and global organizations seeking to improve knowledge management and/or innovation strategies and practices. Understanding the role that culture plays in a multicultural society is complex, understudied and not well understood. Past studies into identifying and comparing dif erent national cultures are dif icult to apply to the multicultural context. Even the operationalisation of the culture construct can be problematic or impractical when many ethnic minorities exists. One approach commonly used in Australia is the categorization of individuals and groups into English (or Anglo) background and Non-English Speaking Background (NESB). In this paper we use these categories to investigate if dif erences can be found in the way in which individuals in these two cohorts respond to workplace situations

    Mining Social Network Analysis Data

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    This project was motivated by the need to meaningfully display large amounts of Social Network Analysis (SNA) data from an exploratory case study into the existence of technological convergence in Australia. We found that many tools used for the display of SNA data did not handle large datasets well due to the denseness of information, a typical problem in the display of large graphs. The approach we offer in this paper does not address our motivating problem. Instead of handling large graphs we sought an alternative approach that would allow us to use the tools we had by mining the dataset for interesting concepts and displaying that subset. This is work in progress and we intend to do more work on our graphics tool and exploring alternative algorithms. Our initial results show that a machine learning approach can provide useful information from SNA data that may not have been apparent from typical SNA techniques

    KNOWING-DOING GAPS IN THE ICT WORKPLACE: GENDER AND CULTURE

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    Knowledge that is not applied, results in a ‘knowing-doing gap’. While education, training and knowledge management practices will affect what we know; how, when and with whom we use that knowledge will be mediated by cultural influences at the societal, organizational, group and individual levels. Based on a study involving 119 ICT workers in multicultural Australia, we found patterns of knowledge usage behaviour using a psychology-based scenario approach across a number of gender and culture-based cohorts: Male, Female, Anglo, Non English Speaking Background, Western and Eastern. In this paper we focus particularly on the results of statistical analysis of the data by gender and culture to compare ‘ethical’ (should do) responses with their corresponding ‘realistic’ (will do) responses

    Closing the Gap Between Different Knowledge Sources and Types in the Call Centre

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    Our current project involves improving the trouble-shooting process in the support centre of a large multinational organisation in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) industry. What has become obvious is the need to capture and reuse many different types of knowledge from a wide range of sources. We have conducted an evaluation study within the organisation to identify the types and sources of knowledge used, the rate of repeat problems and solutions and what improvements are needed. We provide some of our results in this paper. We present an approach known as FastFIX that supports the acquisition and reuse of troubleshooting knowledge from multiple sources using links to relevant intranet and internet-based material. Our system seeks to align the goals of the support-centre, such as maintainability and workflow compatibility, and can inter-operate with the support-centre’s existing problem ticketing and knowledge management systems

    Combining Information Systems and Computer Science Approaches to Identifying Sources of Expertise

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    Knowledge is largely contained in the expertise of an organisation’s workers. Expertise Location is emerging as an important component of an overall knowledge management strategy for many knowledge intensive organisations. Taking an Information Systems approach to expertise, we see knowledge as embodied in people but to some extent the knowledge can be transferred to others, reused and sometimes codified. Taking a Computer Science viewpoint, we believe we can use approaches such as data-mining of artefacts, such as web pages and documents, containing data about people, projects and product documents to identify who has the needed expertise. In this way we are not focused on capturing what people know but on capturing and reusing information about who knows what

    FINDING AND VALIDATING EXPERTISE

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    Being able to make timely contact with an expert who is willing and able to answer the problem at hand is important. However finding such an expert using the systems found in many organisations can be difficult because experts are too busy to ensure information is complete and up to date. We have designed, implemented and evaluated a prototype Expert Recommender Systems based on an investigation of the requirements for such a system in two knowledge intensive organizations together with review of the literature and comparison with existing systems. We designed a triangulated approach which combines automated expert profile creation and maintenance, validation by the expert, and feedback on the expert and the system by the searching party. In this paper we present results from a usability study we conducted of the prototype system with a particular focus on the searching algorithm we designed

    An Approach to Understand, Capture and Nurture Creativity and Innovation Knowledge

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    In many organisations (e.g. IDEO, Nissan, Chaparral Steel) the ability to be innovative and first to the market is their key to success and even survival. Finding and retaining creative minds is difficult, as innovators often become entrepreneurs of their own companies. Current recruitment techniques include the use of psychometric instruments (such as the KAI inventory and Myer-Briggs), role-playing, skill tests and scenario analysis. Our approach is complementary and based on the view that since innovation is a process, starting with novelty- seeking behaviour and ending with an innovative product, that certain individual characteristics and personality traits will be appropriate at different phases of the process. To capture innovation-related knowledge, we acquire ‘war-stories’ from recognised innovators in the form of scenarios and potential responses. This story-bank becomes a means of identifying potential business partners or employees who will respond in ways considered desirable by the organization as well as a means for identifying what areas the individual or organisation are deficient with respect to the innovation process

    A Knowledge Mapping Approach to Facilitate Strategic Human Resource and Knowledge Management A Knowledge Mapping Approach to facilitate Strategic Human Resource and Knowledge Management

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    A key challenge facing organisations is how to effectively connect employees who seek knowledge with those who have the necessary knowledge. From case studies conducted in three separate knowledge intensive organisations, briefly introduced in this paper, we found that locating and measuring expertise were major challenges with no current satisfactory solutions. We offer a method to map intellectual capital within organisations distinct from previous expertise location methods in several significant ways. First, it includes the measurement of knowledge value within the context of the organisation\u27s strategy and activities. Second, it addresses concerns with existing methods such as subjectivity associated with self-reporting, currency, and validation by incorporating several innovative techniques such as 360 degree peer review, data mining, and feedback loops. Thirdly the mapping approach incorporates all types of knowledge including tacit and explicit knowledge
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