27 research outputs found

    Enabling participation of diverse families study: Preliminary Report to the Federation of P&Cs: Family Survey

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    This report provides preliminary results from a study of parental participation commissioned by the Federation of Parents & Citizens’ Association of New South Wales. It is the first stage of a larger study which includes: surveys of parents; surveys of principals; and, focus groups with parents.Federation of Parents & Citizens’ Association of New South Wale

    Enabling participation of diverse families: A discussion paper for P&Cs

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    In 2008 the Federation of Parents & Citizens Association NSW commissioned Dr.Rawsthorne to undertake research on the barriers and facilitators of parental participation in the P&C movement (and more generally in their involvement at schools. This discussion paper reports the findings of research undertaken with active P&C members, potential P&C members, access staff and senior school staff. It places the findings from this research in the context of the broader scholarship and existing research. The aims of the Discussion Paper are to resource local P&C committees as well as generate discussion concerning participation. It does not advocate for a ‘one size fits all’ approach, instead recognises that strategies will be most effective if developed locally and tailored to the particular composition of individual schools and communities.Federation of Parents & Citizens Association NS

    Lesbian parents reconciling work/family responsibilities: Summary Report

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    This report outlines some of the key findings of a study undertaken with lesbian parents in New South Wales in 2006. The study involved qualitative semi-structured interviews with lesbian women caring for children.University of Sydney’s Research & Development Grant progra

    Liverpool Women’s Health Centre Young Women’s Healthy Relationships Project Evaluation Report (No. 1)

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    Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme gran

    Learning support in NSW Public Schools

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    This report examines the achievements of the ‘Every student, Every School’ (ESES) initiative which was introduced into NSW Public Schools in April 2012 based on empirical research undertaken in 2014 . Funded initially under the Australian Government More Support for Students with Disabilities program, the ESES program aims to find better ways of meeting the additional learning and support needs of every student, through building capacity and support within school communities. The ESES framework aims to diversify knowledge, resources and experience about quality education programs rather than concentrating the specialist knowledge in Schools for Specific Purposes (SSPs) (Department of Education and Communities, 2012), support classes or specialist teachers. In this way ESES signalled a cultural shift in education for students with additional learning and support needs. Advocates envisaged that ESES would facilitate the enactment of the Education Standards within the Disability Discrimination Act, and uphold the intent of the Melbourne Declaration. This study provides an opportunity to reflect on the effectiveness of ESES in facilitating this cultural shift and to suggest some future strategies.Teachers Federation of NS

    Liverpool Women’s Health Centre Young Women’s Healthy Relationships Project Evaluation Report (No. 1)

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    Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme gran

    Dropping off the edge 2015: persistent communal disadvantage in Australia

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    This report shows that complex and entrenched disadvantage is experienced by a small but persistent number of locations in each state and territory across Australia. Foreword In 2007, Jesuit Social Services and Catholic Social Services Australia commissioned ground-breaking research into place-based disadvantage across the nation. The resulting report, Dropping off the edge, built on previous work that Jesuit Social Services had engaged Professor Tony Vinson to undertake on its behalf and quickly became a critical resource for governments, service providers and communities attempting to address the challenge of entrenched and often complex geographical disadvantage. That report received over 284 scholarly citations and supported the establishment of the Australian Social Inclusion Board – a body charged with identifying long-term strategies to end poverty in Australia. Since the publication of Dropping off the edge, our organisations have received many requests to update the findings and produce a new report tracking the wellbeing of communities in Australia over the intervening time. Sadly, the current report drives home the enormous challenge that lies in front of our policy makers and service providers, as many communities identified as disadvantaged in 2007 once again head the list in each state and territory. As a society we cannot, and should not, turn away from the challenge of persistent and entrenched locational disadvantage, no matter how difficult it may be to solve the problem. We call on government, community and business to come together to work alongside these communities to ensure long term sustainable change. We hold hope that the young people and future generations in these communities will have a better outlook and life opportunities than is currently available to them. It is our belief that every Australian should have access to the opportunities in life that will enable them to flourish – to complete their education, to get a job, to access safe and affordable housing, to raise their children in safe communities and to see the next generation thrive. Jesuit Social Services and Catholic Social Services Australia are indebted to the dedication and perseverance of Professor Tony Vinson in leading this important research and analysis over the past 15 years. Julie Edwards Chief Executive Officer Jesuit Social Services Marcelle Mogg Chief Executive Officer Catholic Social Services Australi
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