19 research outputs found

    A Global Inclusive Insight

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    The publication of this work was supported by the Open Access Publication Fund of Humboldt-UniversitĂ€t zu Berlin.14 different countries, various research methods, 1 topic: Differentiated Instruction. With increasingly diverse student populations in schools, the establishment of inclusive classrooms has become a top international priority. Teachers around the world are urged to differentiate their instruction in order to support all students’ learning needs. Although there is research on the topic, there are still important gaps to explore, especially the underrepresented international research output. This book tackles such limitations and provides a first ever publication concerning global insights into differentiated instruction. A total of 14 countries from 5 continents provide empirical evidence, theoretical and practical approaches to the topic. The book wraps up with a contribution from Prof. Dr. John Hattie, University of Melbourne, who shares eight theses to help the continuing debate and research on differentiated instruction.Peer Reviewe

    “Do You Think You Have What it Takes?” – Exploring Predictors of Pre-Service Teachers’ Prospective ICT Use

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    Despite extensive efforts to support teachers with the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) into their classroom practice, current research reports that teachers face immense challenges when integrating ICT into their teaching. This issue has become even more relevant with the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus, forcing schools around the world to close for an indefinite period of time and thus to offer remote digital learning solutions. Against this background, this study focused on examining the predictors of pre-service teachers’ prospective ICT use and investigated the heterogeneous results of previous research related to ICT use and gender. Following the ‘will, skill, tool’ framework, the study examined relevant factors of pre-service teachers’ (N = 103) prospective ICT use for teaching and learning processes by means of multiple regression analyses. The analyses included pre-service teachers’ background characteristics, ICT profiles (attitudes and self-efficacy), digital competencies and use of digital tools in order to explore their role in future in-class use of ICT. They also show that there are no gender differences in pre-service teachers’ prospective ICT integration. However, male pre-service teachers hold more positive attitudes towards ICT use than their female counterparts. Additionally, the findings reveal that the two strongest predictors of pre-service teachers’ future ICT use are their attitudes and perceived competency to teach and implement technology in their teaching practices. Finally, the results provide important information about teachers’ training needs. Implications of the results and further research are discussed

    Teacher collaboration, inclusive education and differentiated instruction: A matter of exchange, co-construction, or synchronization?

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    Teacher collaboration is considered an important determinant when implementing differentiated instructional practices. However, most research has extensively explored such constructs using global measures, while overlooking the fact that teacher collaboration is a multidimensional construct. Against this background, this study aimed to explore the different teacher collaboration categories (exchange, synchronization and co-construction) and their impact on teachers’ differentiated instructional practices. In addition, this study took into consideration important variables for teachers’ differentiated instructional implementation, such as self-efficacy, attitudes, and the contextual factor of school track. To respond the research questions, descriptive statistics, one-sample t-tests, mixed analysis of variance with and hierarchical linear regressions were conducted. Results from a mixed analysis of variance indicated that teachers mainly collaborate by means of less demanding and less intensive cooperative practices, such as the exchange of teaching materials and content-related information. Additionally, findings from a hierarchical linear regression indicate that more demanding practices of collaboration, such as synchronization and co-construction, are significantly associated with teachers’ differentiated instructional practices. Implications of the results as well as further lines of research are discussed.Peer Reviewe

    Challenging but positive! – An exploration into teacher attitude profiles towards differentiated instruction (DI) in Germany

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    Background Research has highlighted that personal characteristics such as teachers’ attitudes play an important role in the implementation of inclusive education. However, there are only a few studies that have shed empirical evidence on the relationship of attitudes and inclusive teaching approaches, such as differentiated instruction. In this vein, the present study tackles this research gap and aims to explore teachers’ attitudes specifically towards the inclusive practice of DI in Germany. Aims The present study aimed to investigate teacher profiles based on their attitudes towards differentiated instruction, as well as further to explore whether teachers differentiated instructional implementation varies between the teacher profiles. Sample The sample consists of 450 teachers (Mage = 42.89, SD = 10.48, 65% female), from different school tracks in Germany. Methods A two‐step cluster analysis was performed in order to identify teacher attitude profiles concerning their implementation of differentiated instruction. Moreover, an analysis of variance was conducted in order to identify variations in terms of the implementation of differentiated instruction across the three clusters. Results Results from the cluster analyses indicate three distinct teacher attitude profiles: Cluster 1 ‘The valuing‐teacher’, Cluster 2 ‘The non‐valuing‐teacher’ and Cluster 3 ‘The challenged‐but‐valuing‐teacher’. Moreover, the findings reveal gender and school track differences between the three teacher attitude profiles. Lastly, an analysis of variance indicated that teachers’ differentiated instruction practice varied significantly across the clusters. Conclusions The findings from the present study indicate that teachers not only perceive the value of DI but also the insufficient resources. Thus, it can be assumed that teachers identify both the ‘positive’ and the ‘negative’ aspect of DI, and more importantly, they can recognize both attitude domains towards DI in a similar or different level. Consequently, the results show that attitudes in the context of inclusion cannot be characterised as continuum with two distinct poles.Peer Reviewe

    “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts” – Exploring teachers’ technology readiness profiles and its relation to their emotional state during COVID-19 emergency remote teaching

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    With the rapid spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), schools around the world came to a shutdown. This resulted in an abrupt transition from face-to-face instruction to emergency remote teaching (ERT), resulting in numerous challenges that have greatly affected teachers. Even though research has identified key factors for teachers to effectively implement ERT in the context of the COVID-19 school shutdown, there is still little research on the factors (and their interrelations) that account for the differences between teachers’ experiences. Following a theoretical model of technology readiness, this study aimed to investigate teacher profiles based on domains of technology acceptance, technology competence and technology control. In addition, this study seeks to explore whether teachers’ emotional state during ERT varies between the teacher technology readiness profiles. A total of 124 teachers participated voluntarily in an online survey stemming from the research project “Students-Parents-Teachers in Homeschooling” in Germany. Results from a two-step cluster analysis revealed three distinct teacher technology readiness profiles. Moreover, the findings also revealed gender differences between the three technology readiness profiles. Lastly, an analysis of variance indicated that teachers’ positive emotional state during ERT varied significantly across the clusters. Implications of the results for teacher education and teacher professional development, as well as further lines of research are discussed.Peer Reviewe

    Confident, positive, but interested? Exploring the role of teachers’ interest in their practice of differentiated instruction

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    Given the substantial ongoing increase of individual learning demands, teachers are urged to address student heterogeneity in their daily teaching practice by means of differentiated instruction (DI). As the successful and effective implementation of DI relies mainly on teachers, research has intensively focused on examining teacher-related variables, such as teachers’ self-efficacy and attitudes, that have played a crucial role in their use of differentiated instructional practices. However, besides these well researched constructs, teacher interest is another important teacher-related variable that has, up to now, received very little attention and has been rarely incorporated into inclusive education research. Against this background, this study aimed to bring together previous research on teacher-related variables on their differentiated instructional practice, and extend prior literature by incorporate teachers’ interests. In total, 168 German in-service teachers from different school tracks participated in the study. Results from hierarchical linear regression (HLR) analyses showed a significant and positive predicting role of teacher interests on their practice of DI. Noteworthy is that teacher interests contributed significantly to their differentiated instructional practice, even after controlling for their self-efficacy and attitudes. Implications of the results, as well as further lines of research are discussed.Peer Reviewe

    „Und das Schwierigste ist und bleibt halt, alleine zu lernen“: Eine explorative Untersuchung zum Lehren und Lernen auf Distanz in der Oberstufe

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    Der Beitrag zielt auf die explorative Bearbeitung zweier wenig beachteter Forschungsfelder im Rahmen der bildungsbezogenen Covid-19-Forschung: Zum einen soll er Aufschluss darĂŒber geben, welche Potenziale und Herausforderungen der „Fernunterricht“ in der Oberstufe im Vergleich zu anderen Schulstufen und ‑formen birgt; damit verbunden steht zum anderen die Frage im Mittelpunkt, wie die Förderung von Autonomieerleben, Kompetenzerleben und sozialer Eingebundenheit ĂŒber die Distanz dazu beitragen kann, den besonderen Bedingungen im „Fernunterricht“ der Oberstufe zu begegnen. Methodisch stĂŒtzt sich der Beitrag auf Impulse aus einer Interviewstudie (N = 14) sowie aus einer detaillierten Analyse eines Fallbeispiels als Sonderfall im Datenmaterial. Die Interviews wurden – als Nachfolgeerhebung zu einer Befragung im April 2020 – zwischen April und Juni 2021 gefĂŒhrt und nach Anonymisierung und Transkription inhaltsanalytisch mithilfe des Programms MAXQDA ausgewertet. Aus dem Material wurden die Kategorien SelbststĂ€ndigkeit, Corona-bedingte Unsicherheiten sowie WissenschaftspropĂ€deutik durch fachliches und ĂŒberfachliches Lernen als Besonderheiten fĂŒr den Distanzunterricht in der Oberstufe herausgearbeitet. Das Fallbeispiel wiederum zeigt als „practice example“ Möglichkeiten auf, diesen Besonderheiten durch StĂ€rkung von Autonomieerleben, Kompetenzerleben und sozialer Eingebundenheit produktiv zu begegnen. The paper presents an exploratory study on two current research gaps within the context of Covid-19 educational research: On the one hand, the study aims to examine the potentials and challenges of “distance learning” at upper secondary school (Oberstufe) compared to other school forms and tracks. On the other hand, it focuses on investigating how fostering students’ autonomy, competence and relatedness through distance learning can help meet the special learning and teaching conditions at upper secondary school. Following a qualitative research design, the study analyses data from an interview study (N = 14) including an in-depth exploration of data material from a case study. Concerning the interviews, data stems from a follow-up survey conducted between April and June 2021. After anonymization and transcription, the data was analyzed using the MAXQDA program. From the material, the categories of self-regulated learning, Corona-related uncertainties, and science propaedeutics through subject-specific and interdisciplinary learning were worked out as special features concerning distance teaching and learning at the upper level of secondary school. Furthermore, the case study serves as a “practice example” and sheds information on the possibilities to productively work these peculiarities by strengthening autonomy, competence and relatedness

    Differentiated instruction in distance learning. A quantitative study on the frequency of the implementation of inclusive practices and supportive predictors

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    LehrkrĂ€fte sind verpflichtet, Bildung fĂŒr alle SchĂŒler*innen zu ermöglichen, und dies in jeder Unterrichtsform. Auf heterogene BedĂŒrfnisse können LehrkrĂ€fte eingehen, indem sie ihren Unterricht durch die Implementation von binnendifferenzierenden und individualisierenden Maßnahmen differenziert und damit inklusiv gestalten. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie zeigen, dass LehrkrĂ€fte im pandemiebedingten Distanzunterricht insgesamt weniger differenzierende Maßnahmen eingesetzt haben als im PrĂ€senzunterricht und dass die am hĂ€ufigsten eingesetzten Maßnahmen die zur Öffnung des Unterrichts bzw. zur AutonomiegewĂ€hrung waren, genauso wie der Einsatz von abgestuften Aufgaben und Materialien. Den Einsatz differenzierender Maßnahmen flankieren das Alter, das Lernsetting, eine hohe LehrkrĂ€fteselbstwirksamkeitserwartung, die Kollaboration mit Kolleg*innen bei der Planung differenzierten Unterrichts sowie die wahrgenommene Notwendigkeit von Differenzierung. (DIPF/Orig.)Teachers must ensure education for all students by using inclusive practices. The study’s results reveal that teachers used fewer inclusive practices in the COVID-19-related distance teaching compared to pre-pandemic classroom learning and indicate that the most frequently used measures were those from the category open education and the use of tiered assignments. Moreover, teachers’ inclusive practice can be predicted by factors such as age, the learning setting, collaboration, the value teachers see in using DI, and their self-efficacy. (DIPF/Orig.

    Mexican school students’ perceptions of inclusion: A brief report on students’ social inclusion, emotional well-being, and academic self-concept at school

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    With the increasing student diversity, inclusive education has only become more relevant. Given that inclusive education is considered as the most effective approach to improve quality of education and promote equity and social cohesion, research has focused on examining the facilitators and barriers of meaningful inclusive education as well as the effectiveness of inclusive education on students’ academic outcomes. In contrast, far less attention has been paid to explore students’ non-achievement outcomes, such as their socio-emotional development. Therefore, this brief report presents the results of a small-scale exploratory study which examines Mexican students’ perceptions regarding their social inclusion, emotional well-being, and academic self-concept. A total of 101 Mexican students were included in the sample. Nonparametric tests such as Chi-square goodness of fit, Mann–Whitney U and Dunn’s tests were conducted to analyze the data. Overall, results show that students in general perceive themselves included at school, however, students attending private schools experience less emotional well-being. Implications of the results as well as further lines of research are discussed.Peer Reviewe

    DI (Differentiated Instruction) Does Matter! The Effects of DI on Secondary School Students’ Well-Being, Social Inclusion and Academic Self-Concept

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    In consideration of the substantial increase in students’ learning demands, teachers are urged to address student heterogeneity in their daily teaching practice by means of differentiated instruction (DI). The practice of DI, as a vehicle to achieve inclusive education, not only aims to support all students’ academic learning but also foster their social and emotional development. However, current research in the field of DI has mostly been limited to an examination of its effects on students’ achievement outcomes. Consequently, the potential impact of DI on students’ socio-emotional outcomes has, till now, received very little attention. In order to address this gap in the research, the current researchers seek to investigate the effects of DI on school students’ well-being, social inclusion and academic self-concept. Survey participants in this study included 379 students from 23 inclusive and regular classes in secondary schools in Austria. Following multilevel analyses, the results have indicated that students’ rating of their teachers’ DI practice is positively associated with their school well-being, social inclusion and academic self-concept. However, a t-test for dependent samples demonstrated that students perceive their teachers’ DI practice to be infrequent. Implications of the results along with further lines of research are also presented in this paper.Peer Reviewe
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