29 research outputs found

    Poster: Old Vermont Films: Opportunities for Research, New Films & Community Events

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    Fred\u27s poster shows that there can be new life for old Vermont films

    Promoting Vermont Films in Vermont\u27s Libraries: Presenting Freedom & Unity - The Vermont Movie in a Small Vermont Library

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    This poster reviews steps taken to screen a recent Vermont movie (over a two month period, in six parts) at the Tunbridge (Vermont) Public Library, in an effort to promote Vermont films, at the same time provide provide programming for libraries. The filmmakers and librarians initiated post-screening discussions on topics explored in the film, with the goal of engaging audiences on local issues. A review of the audience attendance, funding and recommendations for future collaborations is included

    Old Vermont Films: Opportunities for Research, New Films & Community Events

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    Fred discussed the process and challenges of locating old Vermont films and digitizing them. These new films were then shown at various community events to publicize and promote them. Fred ended with listing next steps to take to keep this digitization initiative moving forward

    Facilitating Collaboration Across International Boundaries -- A Medical Librarian Job Exchange Program

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    Fred discussed the history behind the International Job Exchange Project, the benefits to individuals as well as institutions, and the current state of the program

    Presenting Moving Images to the Public: Opportunities and Choices

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    When presenting your institution’s films on the web, you face a host of decisions: what formats should you use? which internet host sites will best serve your needs? should you apply institution logos/identifiers? what about web address redirects? This discussion, which encourages audience participation, will address these concerns and more, include uploading mystery footage to help identify locations and people, employing on-screen timecodes to ensure accurate feedback, and searching out additional, even undiscovered, material to enhance the film’s context, such as diaries, scripts, and still photos

    Applying Evidence-Based Librarianship to Developing Countries Based ICT Training Programs

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    As information communication technology (ICT) continues to develop in all areas of the world, ongoing technology training is vital for information professionals to keep abreast of technological advances in their practice However, planning and managing developing country-based training programs can be challenging under extraordinary conditions, such as training in non-native languages and variable skill levels among trainees. Applying principles of evidence-based librarianship, in particular the use of measurement data offers several opportunities for improving ICT training. First, assessing trainees’ skills and experience will provide the trainer with important data in order to tailor training to the needs of the trainees. Using EBL techniques have additional advantages such as enhancing the training experience for both the student and the teacher, using EBL in modeling best education practices to library professionals, identifying data on the impact of ICT training, and spending precious training resources carefully. Properly designed assessments tools give trainers useful information about their students experience and skills in order to design an effective curriculum, as well provide data about the impact the training has made on the students. These techniques will not only assure the trainees the best training possible but also will support decision makers and potential funders about the value of ICT training

    Access to Mobile Resources: How Does It Affect the Clerkship Experience?

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    Objectives: To evaluate the perceived benefits of access to library-licensed mobile clinical decision support resources in clinical medical education. Methods: A cohort of medical students was surveyed midway through the clerkship year. Dana Medical Library offered instruction on clinical mobile resources at the beginning of the year. Students were offered a subject guide and assistance with authentication. Assessment methods included web analytics measuring the utility of the subject guide and a survey. Survey questions gathered data on access to mobile devices, relevance of instruction, use of library-licensed mobile resources, and benefits and barriers to their use in the clinical setting. Students were also asked whether access to mobile resources facilitated comparable educational experiences across clerkship sites. Results: The survey was sent to all 111 students from the University of Vermont College of Medicine class of 2014; 31 completed the survey, with a completion rate of 28%. All respondents owned a mobile device, despite efforts to recruit both users and non-users. Nearly 75% of respondents reported using an iPhone. About 90% of respondents brought their mobile device on rotation. Generally, the wireless access at each clerkship site was rated good or excellent. Of the 60% of respondents who attended the instruction session on mobile resources, 94% found the class helpful. Half of the respondents looked at the Mobile Apps subject guide; 70% of those who did found it helpful. A significant increase in page views was reflected in subject guide usage statistics immediately following the instruction session. Approximately 25% of respondents sought out individual assistance at the library. Conclusions: Respondents suggested improvements to library instruction such as distributing access codes during the class and demonstrating installation of an app. A large number of students did not seek additional assistance from the library, citing they did not have any questions. While that may be because they found the subject guide and/or class sufficiently helpful, a significant number of respondents indicated they were unaware of the subject guide. This suggests a need for further promotion and marketing efforts. Researchers were surprised that nonlibrary licensed apps (ePocrates or Medscape) were valued over resources such as DynaMed, and that the most common barrier cited was not having access to appropriate apps. Finally, almost all of the participants who reported taking a mobile device on a rotation agreed it facilitated access to clinical information and improved the clerkship experience

    Deepening Ties Between the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and the University of Vermont

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    Building relationships between university libraries The umbrella affiliation agreement between the University of Vermont and PUCP, in effect since 2010, initially focused on the subject areas of biomedical technology and instrumentation. However, as relationships on the two campuses were built and strengthened, other collaborative opportunities beyond the original focus emerged, including with Engineering, Public Administration, and the Libraries. Kathia Hanza, director of PUCP Libraries, expressed interest in facilitating our return in March 2016, to focus on development of library research guides as a mechanism to present library resources in contextually meaningful ways. When we did return in March, it was with a sense of familiarity and connection that allowed us to launch into more focused dialog and work . The extent of the work that PUCP librarians had already done on their library guide development in a relatively short period of time was extremely impressive. PUCP Libraries have recently launched their thematic subject guides, which are prominently featured on their library home page

    Challenges & Rewards with an Institutional Repository

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    UVM Libraries launched ScholarWorks @ UVM in 2013 to collect, preserve and disseminate scholarly works of faculty, students as well as make collections, reports and other materials more discoverable and available.This institutional repository has grown to over twenty collections, comprising of student dissertations and theses, public health projects, historic botanical research, Vermont history, faculty publications and more.Challenges include varied participation across campus, impacting work flow in library positions, and adding another library service.Author’s works enjoy increased discoverability from all over the world, from low income countries to individuals that seek information without the benefit of library resources. IRs support libraries’ intellectual mission
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