68 research outputs found

    Transitions to and within adulthood for young people with special educational needs

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    Poverty, educational attainment and achievement in Scotland : a critical review of the literature

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    Risk behaviours in transition to adulthood for people with autism spectrum disorder

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    This article explores risk behaviour in adults with a diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA) during the transition to adulthood, drawing on interviews with twelve individuals and on two focus groups comprising members of other families affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The authors examine the subtle interplay between engagement in a variety of risk behaviours and the health and wellbeing of particular individuals with ASD. Feelings of anger, hopelessness and self-harming were common responses to bullying and pervasive difficulties with social interaction. There appears to be no clear causal relationship between risk behaviours and transition, which is characterised by protracted and complex period of identity formation. The current orthodoxy of service provision emphasises the importance of integration with the local community, irrespective of the challenges this may present to people with ASD. There is scope for further elaboration of the concept of ‘emerging adulthood’ in relation to people with disabilities in general and people with ASD in particular

    Emotional education as second language acquisition?

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    In this paper we argue that while emotional education intervention packages offer certain advantages, there are risks associated with their uncritical use. The main risk is that if the unwanted behaviour of some pupils is seen merely as a problem that can be dealt with through targeted intervention, then important, identity constitutive parts of their reality might become obscured. We reconsider sociological explanations of school disaffection, along with more recent sociological and philosophical attempts to explore the emotional aspect of schooling. We hypothesise that some of the challenging behaviour exhibited by young people in schools is solution seeking; that it is a functional adaptation to an essentially foreign emotional environment. We conclude that attempts to educate the emotions should aim to develop morally rich virtues rather than empty intelligences.peer-reviewe

    Where next for pupils excluded from Special Schools and Pupil Referral Units?

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    Reimagining academic freedom:a companion piece

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    We consider academic freedom in the context of broader developments in higher education. We suggest that the tenor of contemporary debates on the subject is a manifestation of pervasive forms of authoritarianism that undermine the university as a home of adventure, a place and space that is conducive to the conduct of free inquiry.It is evident that some champions of academic freedom engage in dangerously polarized forms of spectacle, engendered by a management culture that embraces showmanship and routinely favours talking over listening. As such, they represent a force for conformity rather than dissent; division rather than collective action. These forms of spectacle jeopardize rather than promote the principles of academic freedom by polarizing the terms of the debate for maximum ‘impact’. We explore the implications of conceptualizations of academic freedom that focus on the rights of everyone in the university. We also suggest that the notion might usefully be extended to those on precarious contracts, and to students facing normative expectations about what constitutes ‘progress’ in academic practice. Drawing upon Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century and an essay by Vaclav Havel, we reassess the notion of the ‘pursuit of truth’ that underlies conventional definitions of academic freedom.We conclude with a brief vignette, a rousing endorsement of the ineffable and irreducible qualities of friendship. This entails slaying a fictitious, three-headed dragon and embracing a form of spectacle that transcends attempts to capture why it moves us. We leave the reader with warm-blooded traces of energy, curiosity, liveliness, and quiet determination
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