72 research outputs found

    No Place Like Home

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    Copyright (2015) Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation. Published version reproduced here with permission from publisher

    ac.care, Beyond Kayaking, Communities for Children Murraylands Final Report: The use of Communities for Children programs to improve family outcomes in Murraylands region of South Australia

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    The evaluation of the programs provided by the Communities for Children initiative (CfC) is presented here. This report is divided into five sections. The first section presents the background information on the CfC initiative including an outline of the demographic and epidemiological outcomes for children in the area of focus for this evaluation. Additionally, the introduction outlines some of the theoretical basis for the models of care and the therapeutic models of care that are common in all the programs provided. Subsequent sections provide the therapeutic models of care specific to the particular program provided by the organisation or service. The report also provides a conclusion for each program and a final conclusion for the evaluation research project as a whole

    Applying Psychosocial Theories for Nursing Students

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    “Copyright 2015 Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation. Published version of the paper reproduced here with permission from the publisher.

    Communities for Children Final Report: KidStuff and the use of Communities for Children programs

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    The evaluation of the KidStuff for Young Parents programs provided by the Communities for Children initiative (CfC) is presented here. This report is divided into three sections. The first section presents the background information on the CfC initiative including an outline of the demographic and epidemiological outcomes for children in the area of focus for this evaluation. Additionally, the introduction outlines some of the theoretical basis for the models of care and the therapeutic models of care that are common in all the programs provided. The second section describes the implementation of the programs and the evaluation of the programs based on the therapeutic models of care specific to the KidStuff for young parent’s program provided by Metropolitan Youth Health through Anglicare SA, and UnitingCare Wesley, Port Adelaide communities for Children programs. The third section of this report provides the results of the research; discussions; conclusions, and a set of recommendations for future program improvements and research

    Using mixed methods to analyse barriers to primary paediatric health access

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    Author version made available in accordance with the publisher's policy.This paper describes the way in which a mixed methods approach might provide a knowledge base to understand some of the factors involved in access to paediatric healthcare. The paper addresses the potential for this approach to start to build an evidence-informed understanding of a public policy issue. Our research tracked the increase in paediatric presentations at the Woman’s and Children’s Health Service Emergency Department (ED) in South Australia for primary care illness events. The use of ED for primary care services is an increasing issue for emergency service provision. The mixed methods used the Hospital Admission Status (HAS), Paediatric Emergency Department data, analysis of the South Australian Social Health Atlas for demographic and epidemiological data, and triage priority information. This quantitative analysis informed the use of interviews with parents, community health providers and emergency health professionals. Sequencing allowed the researchers to integrate the question over time and revealed policy deficits in health access in Australia

    Are the new General Practitioner Plus centers the correct government response to a lack of pediatric after-hours care for parents?

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    Providing timely and appropriate primary health care after-hours is a major policy issue confronting many Western governments. Increasingly, consumers are seeking care from emergency departments, for health problems that would be better serviced by a primary care professional. Mindful of this issue both State and Federal government in Australia have established and funded General Practice Super Clinics to provide after-hours care in low socioeconomic areas for vulnerable populations. A key policy requirement of funding is the provision of after-hours care. This paper takes a case study of parents seeking after-hours, non-emergency care for their sick child. This study illustrates the way in which GP Super Clinics provide an appropriate response to this issue, but the analysis questions whether or not this can be achieved under the current arrangements

    A scoping study: children, policy and cultural shifts in homelessness services in South Australia: are children still falling through the gaps?

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    Author version made available following 12 month embargo from date of publication (25 November 2015) in accordance with publisher copyright policy.Homeless families are the fastest growing segment of the homelessness population. Homelessness services are often the first to know when children are at risk of disengagement with health, welfare and education services. Changes to Australian policy to explicitly attend to the needs of children are attempts to address the complexity, and provide better outcomes for, homeless children. There are mounting levels of evidence describing some of the needs of children who are homeless. Using the scoping study methodological framework this review of academic and grey literature was to identify the extent service providers provide for the needs of homeless children. The literature search was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 using ProQuest, Science Direct, Sage and OVID databases. Therefore the objectives of this scoping study were to: (1) identify the specific needs of children in homelessness (2) describe recent changes in policy relating to care for children in homelessness services (3) explore the evidence on how service providers can enact care for children in homelessness services (4) identify the types of practice changes that are needed to optimise outcomes for children and (5) identify the gaps in service delivery. This article describes the Australian policy changes and explores the potential impact of subsequent sector reforms on the internal practices in frontline homelessness services, in order, to overcome structural and systemic barriers, and promote opportunities for children in homeless families. This scoping study, literature review that contributes to the understanding of the impact of policy change on frontline staff and suggests possible practice changes and future research options

    Communities for Children Final Report: The use of Communities for Children program: Cultural Community Capacity Builder program to improve the Social Determinants of health outcomes in Western Adelaide

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    The evaluation of the programs provided by the Communities for Children initiative (CfC) is presented here. This report is divided into five sections. The first section presents the background information on the CfC initiative including an outline of the demographic and epidemiological outcomes for children in the area of focus for this evaluation. Additionally, the introduction outlines some of the theoretical basis for the models of care and the therapeutic models of care that are common in all the programs provided. Subsequent sections provide the therapeutic models of care specific to the particular program provided by the organisation or service. The report also provides a conclusion for each program and a final conclusion for the evaluation research project as a whole

    Independent Evaluation, Final Report: Being with Baby Program, FamilyZone, Ingle Farm

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    Introduction: The evaluation of one of the programs provided by the Communities for Children initiative (CfC) is resented here. This Salvation Army, FamilyZone Ingle Farm Hub commissioned report is divided into five sections. The first section presents the background information on the CfC Initiative including an outline of the demographic and epidemiological outcomes for children in the Ingle Farm, and surrounding areas. This section addresses the need for CfC iterventions given the high rates of vulnerability in the children living in this area. Additionally, the introduction outlines briefly some of research process used. Section three provides the theoretical and evidence base for the models of care and the therapeutic models of care that are commonly used in the FamilyZone Community Hub model and in the Being with Baby program. The literature review provides substantial international evidence base for the Being with Baby and use of the community hub model for service delivery, such as FamilyZone, for decreasing accumulative harm, abuse and neglect of infants and small children. Subsequent sections provide research evidence and results on the therapeutic models of care specific to the Being with Baby program. The report also provides a conclusion for the Being with Baby program in the FamilyZone setting
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