7,645 research outputs found

    Computer program for liquid metal condensing heat transfer coefficients inside tubes manual

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    Computer program for calculation of liquid metal condensing heat transfer coefficients inside tube

    Letter from Franklin H. Ornstein, Chair of the North Hempstead Democratic Committee, to Geraldine Ferraro

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    Congratulatory letter from Franklin H. Ornstein, Chair of the North Hempstead Democratic Committee, to Geraldine Ferraro. Includes standard response letter from Ferraro and a data entry sheet.https://ir.lawnet.fordham.edu/vice_presidential_campaign_correspondence_1984_new_york/1261/thumbnail.jp

    Return times, recurrence densities and entropy for actions of some discrete amenable groups

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    Results of Wyner and Ziv and of Ornstein and Weiss show that if one observes the first k outputs of a finite-valued ergodic process, then the waiting time until this block appears again is almost surely asymptotic to 2hk2^{hk}, where hh is the entropy of the process. We examine this phenomenon when the allowed return times are restricted to some subset of times, and generalize the results to processes parameterized by other discrete amenable groups. We also obtain a uniform density version of the waiting time results: For a process on ss symbols, within a given realization, the density of the initial kk-block within larger nn-blocks approaches 2−hk2^{-hk}, uniformly in n>skn>s^k, as kk tends to infinity. Again, similar results hold for processes with other indexing groups.Comment: To appear in Journal d'Analyse Mathematiqu

    Choisir le chemin moins fréquenté : regard sur la musique traditionnelle

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    Au cours du xxe siĂšcle, la musique et les danses traditionnelles rĂ©gionales et communautaires ont presque complĂštement disparu autant au Canada qu’aux États-Unis. La majoritĂ© des musiciens locaux ont soit dĂ©laissĂ© leur legs musical devenu marginal en faveur d’un rĂ©pertoire plus Ă  la mode soit simplement cessĂ© la pratique de leur instrument. Il y a cependant des musiciens qui ont consacrĂ© leur vie Ă  maĂźtriser et Ă  perpĂ©tuer leur hĂ©ritage musical. Pourquoi ces personnes ont-elles choisi un chemin si peu frĂ©quentĂ©? Nous allons aborder cette question Ă  travers la vie de deux musiciens qui ont suivi cette route : Louis Beaudoin, violoneux franco-amĂ©ricain de Burlington (Vermont), et Louis « Pitou » Boudreault, violoneux de Chicoutimi (QuĂ©bec). Ces hommes, issus de familles de musiciens, ont vĂ©cu leur jeunesse dans des milieux oĂč la musique et la danse traditionnelles jouaient un rĂŽle social fort important au sein de leur famille et de la collectivitĂ©. MalgrĂ© la disparition de ces contextes, ces deux musiciens ont continuĂ© d’apprĂ©cier la richesse de leur vĂ©cu, ainsi que la spĂ©cificitĂ© et la valeur de leur hĂ©ritage musical. Comprendre leur loyautĂ© et leur plaisir Ă  l’égard de cette musique, c’est aussi entrevoir le pouvoir Ă©vocateur et transcendant des arts traditionnels

    Rallying Cry: Songs of Social Change, the Artists They Motivated, the Movements They Inspired

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    This study explores what are commonly called “protest songs.” Groups involved in mass social movements often use protest songs to create a sense of solidarity, or to make a statement at public demonstrations. Such songs are usually simple, with a common refrain. However, the study also will include more complex songs that do not have the simple words and structures of typical protest songs, and were primarily performed by a professional musician or played in recorded form (as opposed to being sung by large groups of the public at mass rallies), but were written and performed with the intention of making a statement and impacting the public’s point of view on issues of social and/or political significance. This paper looks across several key songs and songwriters, and will illuminate interconnections, patterns and insights into how such songs evolved over the course o f time, principally the first three-quarters of the twentieth century. Illuminated here is a web o f artists, beginning in the early twentieth century, who have been strongly influenced by each other and have borrowed from each other’s work and ideas. Also included are those who nurtured and supported the development of much o f the musical work discussed here.Master'sCollege of Arts and Sciences: Liberal StudiesUniversity of Michiganhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/117877/1/Ornstein.pd

    Breve panorama de la novela chilena reciente

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    The Political Economy of Urban Growth

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    Why do some US cities strictly limit the growth of their populations, while others are more accommodating to new housing construction? Though this may seem at first glance like a purely parochial concern, the question is of broad national interest. Regulatory barriers to housing construction slow economic growth by impeding the migration of labor. They exacerbate wealth inequality by privileging incumbent landowners over potential newcomers. And they harm the environment by encouraging auto-dependent urban sprawl and prohibiting dense, walkable communities. Understanding the political motivations behind restrictive municipal zoning regulations is therefore of vital national importance. In my first paper (Chapter II), I show that the timing of city council elections plays an important role in shaping municipal land use policy. Because some residents are deeply involved in municipal politics (e.g. homeowners), while others are not (e.g. renters), the composition of the electorate tends to change depending on the timing of the election. This shapes the reelection incentives of city councilmembers. In an empirical analysis of California cities, I show that cities with off-cycle elections tend to issue fewer new housing permits and have higher home prices than similar cities that hold their elections on-cycle. This result holds in both cross-sectional and difference-in-difference analysis. Cities that shifted their elections from off-cycle to on-cycle subsequently saw a larger increase in permitting, and slower growth in home prices, than comparable cities where elections remained off-cycle. This finding suggests that election timing can have non-trivial effects on both political representation and land use policy. In my second paper (Chapter III), I develop a new method for estimating local area public opinion. This method, called Machine Learning and Poststratification (MLP), improves on current practice by modeling public opinion using machine learning techniques like random forest and k-nearest neighbors. The predictions from these models are then poststratified (i.e. reweighted using demographic information) to produce public opinion estimates for local areas of interest. In a Monte Carlo simulation, I show that this technique outperforms classical multilevel regression and poststratification (MRP) and disaggregated survey estimates, particularly when the data generating process is highly nonlinear. In an empirical application, I show that MLP produces superior county-level estimates of Trump support in the 2016 presidential election than either MRP or disaggregation. In my final paper (Chapter IV), I explore a puzzling feature of US municipal land use politics: cities with more liberal residents tend to enact more restrictive zoning policies than similar conservative cities. In a formal model, I explain this as the result of a public goods provision problem. In liberal cities, where residents value public goods provision more highly, there is a greater incentive to ensure that newcomers do not underinvest in housing, thereby receiving a disproportionate share of public goods relative to property taxes. In an empirical analysis, I show that liberal cities issue fewer new building permits, have higher home prices, and score higher on a survey-based measure of land use policy restrictiveness, a pattern that cannot be explained by differences in geography, demographics, income, or characteristics of the housing stock.PHDPolitical ScienceUniversity of Michigan, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studieshttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/145832/1/ornstein_1.pd

    Interpreting Shakespeare: The Dramatic Text and the Film

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    I\u27d like to talk about the relationship between my experience of filmmaking and my thinking about the teaching and interpreting of Shakespeare. Filmmaking has had an extraordinary influence on my awareness of a play as a work of art, or rather as a series of artistic choices. When we read a play as a literary text, it already exists as a finished product, and we try to understand it as such. It would not ordinarily occur to us to wonder why it has a particular form — why it begins and ends in this manner rather than other equally possible ways. When I made the film The Poetry of Robert Frost, I began, of course, with a literary text, with a selection of Frost\u27s poetry. But, in a sense, I also began with a blank page, with the questions: How shall I handle the poetry cinematically? How shall I present \u27The Hill Wife,\u27 for example, in film
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