28 research outputs found

    Teaching Health Impact and Behavior with Infographics

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    The use of Infographics can be a tool that not only allows for the communication of empirical health data in an understandable format, but encourages the health administration student to present evidence-based research in a creative manner. The purpose of this paper is to describe a learning exercise that implements Infographics to demonstrate an impact of a health issue and/or encourage a health behavior change. This learning exercise is developed to increase student knowledge and visual literacy skills with respect to presenting, in a concise format, a well-researched and referenced health issue and/or a health behavior change. Specifically, the exercise was designed to: (a) curate health statistics and reference information for the selected health issue; (b) identify media resources and apply copyright and fair use in a proper manner; (c) evaluate internet resources for credibility and accuracy; and (d) utilize Infographic tools to communicate one\u27s visual viewpoint. At the conclusion of the course, students reflected on the effective visual aspects of their Infographics and the points that were challenging to communicate using this medium. The benefits of this applied learning approach for students and the faculty instructor are discussed

    Pieces of the Whole: Using the Research Process to Integrate Data Management and Information Literacy Skills

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    The research process is naturally embraced as part of the academic curriculum in higher education. Graduate students write theses and dissertations based on their original scholarships, undergraduate stu­dents produce papers for courses and work in labs or in the field, and both participate in faculty-led research projects. The research process is tack­led holistically through coursework, yet when library instructors are invited to teach students about information literacy and research data management topics, these may be presented as tangential to or mistimed with other course content and learning activities. In this chapter, the authors present a com­prehensive, student-centered model for teaching research data management and information literacy as components embedded in the research process. The approach presented in this chapter is comprehensive in several ways: It merges research data management and information literacy instruction into a single session. It positions these library instruction components within the context of the research process. It aligns instruction outcomes with course objectives. The authors describe two courses in which they have adopted this approach—an undergraduate science class and a doctoral level nursing seminar—to highlight how it can be repurposed for different learning environments

    Online Dating and Sexual Assault

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    Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Professional Development Events in Academic Libraries Have Minimal Impact on Knowledge, Behavior, and Organizational Change Without Meaningful Design and Participant Intentionality

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    A Review of: Dali, K., Bell, N., & Valdes, Z. (2021). Learning and change through diversity, equity, and inclusion professional development: Academic librarians’ perspectives. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 47(6), 102448. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2021.102448 Objective – To explore experiences of library diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) professional development events (PDEs) and to examine the long-term impacts on knowledge and personal practices of librarians and organizational change Design – Exploratory, qualitative survey, hermeneutic phenomenology, retrospective reflection on a critical incident Setting – Academic libraries across the United States and Canada Subjects – 141 survey responses from academic librarians in public and private institutions who attended a DEI PDEs Methods – The authors distributed a survey in late 2020 to librarians in public and private academic institutions across the US and Canada. Participants were asked to reflect retrospectively on memorable and impactful DEI PDEs they attended in the last five years and to focus on events at least a year before the survey was conducted. Participants were also asked to describe if the PDE changed their own learning and practice, as well as their organization’s policies and practices. The authors used hermeneutic phenomenology as a framework for their research and data analysis, which they describe as an approach to phenomenology that emphasizes the range and diversity of experiences. The survey questions were designed to illicit retrospective reflection and critical incident technique in order to capture the most impactful and memorable experiences with PDEs from respondents. Survey responses were coded, categorized, interpreted, and then mapped to the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of change, a principle that breaks the phases of change into six processes: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance, and termination. Additionally, the authors also ensured they represented diverse backgrounds as a method for addressing and reducing bias. Main Results – The authors uncovered a trove of varied experiences and perspectives related to personal as well as organizational knowledge and change. However, they identified five broader categories of learning from the study data: cognitive learning, behavioral learning and change, personal learning and change, social learning and change, and emotional learning and change. The majority of study participants (n=91) chose to attend DEI PDEs rather than being required by their organizations to attend. Many came into the PDE with goals to attain new knowledge (n=39) and to change their behavior (n=30). Similarly, respondents noted that the PDE impacted them most by giving them new awareness around DEI topics and systemic inequities (n=51) and inspired behavioral changes and a commitment to taking action (n=28). PDEs also impacted some participants’ self-awareness around their own biases and privileges (n=22). However, responses included skepticism around the impact of PDEs on any real and meaningful change, particularly related to organizational culture and action. Respondents emphasized concern about performative allyship and underscored the challenges and barriers to making DEI a meaningful component of many institutional practices and policies. While respondents noted increased awareness around systemic inequities, these responses stood in stark contrast to several comments expressing frustration at the lack of meaningful organizational change and demoralization felt at the fruitlessness of DEI PDEs. The authors’ initial data analysis revealed that PDEs most impacted cognitive awareness and behavioral action. However, when they mapped the data to the TTM, results emphasized the impact of PDEs on behavioral learning and action. Conclusion – Academic librarians who participate in DEI-related PDEs experience a wide array of emotional responses to the training and leave with a broad range of cognitive, behavioral, and affective impacts. While data suggests that these PDEs increased awareness and knowledge and behavioral action the most, there is little that suggests that meaningful organizational change follows afterwards. Another challenge is the gap between having awareness of DEI topics and taking steps toward meaningful self-improvement. The authors note that it takes time for knowledge to translate into action and highlight the importance of post-PDE check ins by PDE facilitators and library administration. Academic librarians should approach DEI PDEs with intentionality by challenging themselves to set goals and use their new DEI knowledge to create actionable change both personally and organizationally. On the other hand, creators of DEI PDEs should take time to understand the participants and organizational culture in order to design trainings intentionally, using the TTM as a guide to identify how the PDE maps to the stages of change leading to meaningful action and follow up. Without intentionality, follow up, and goal setting, DEI-related PDEs may be ineffective, performative, and demoralizing.

    Library Staff Morale Correlates with Having a Sense of Respect and Value for Their Work, Relationship to Direct Supervisors and Colleagues, and Autonomy and Flexibility in Their Work Environments

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    A Review of: Glusker, A., Emmelhainz, C., Estrada, N., & Dyess, B. (2022). “Viewed as equals”: The impacts of library organizational cultures and management on library staff morale. Journal of Library Administration, 62(2), 153–189. https://doi.org/10.1080/01930826.2022.2026119 Objective – To explore what library organizational factors influence library staff morale. Design – Semi-structured interview, grounded theory. Setting – Academic libraries across the United States during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Subjects – 34 academic library staff, defined by the authors as employees whose positions do not require an MLIS degree and do not include the title “librarian”, from 23 private and public colleges and universities across 16 states, mostly representative of the West and Midwest regions. Methods – In 2020, the authors emailed a call for study participants to library listservs and state library associations across the US, selected a convenience sample of 34 library staff from academic institutions, and conducted structured interviews by phone or by Google Meet over the course of May through June 2020. The authors note that the sample over-represents public and larger institutions in the West and Midwest regions. A student worker transcribed the audio recordings and de-identified transcripts underwent iterative, thematic coding in MAXQDA, a qualitative data analysis tool. The authors used a grounded theory approach to conduct open coding, then identified relationships between themes, and elaborated upon each theme based on its relationship to a theoretical model of morale impact avenues in library organizational structures, which was developed by one of the authors. Main Results –The authors uncovered that most study participants (n = 21) reported having high levels of morale, a surprise to the research team who expected that participants with lower levels of morale would participate in the study. Most participants (n = 27) worked in public and larger institutions, and the majority were female (n = 24), though only 5 were Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). Participants mostly had MLIS degrees or other advanced degrees. The results of the study expanded beyond the original research questions to comprise a broader set of factors that impact morale levels including relationships with colleagues and direct managers, opportunities for advancement, respect, work autonomy, and funding. Respondents emphasized that staff morale was significantly impacted by their relationship with direct managers, noting that micromanagement, defensiveness, and lack of accommodations contributed to lower levels of morale and a sense of disconnection. Managers who were supportive, advocated for staff needs, and were good listeners improved morale. Relationships between staff and their librarian colleagues also impacted morale, with the librarian–staff divide and treatment of staff by librarians being major contributors to influencing morale. Additionally, staff felt that having or lacking respect from librarians and administration and having autonomy and flexibility in their work made a big impact on morale. Having opportunities to meaningfully engage, to advance in the workplace, to receive professional development funding, to participate in decision-making processes, and to feel valued by the institution contributed to higher levels of staff morale. Conclusion – Library staff morale is impacted mostly by staff members’ sense of connection, respect, and value within the institution and among their librarian colleagues, direct managers, and library administration. Having pathways for advancement and professional development, meaningful opportunities to contribute to institutional decision-making, and autonomy over their professional and personal lives contributed to a higher sense of staff morale. The authors highlight several practical recommendations for improving staff morale including fostering a respectful environment, advocating for more flexible and better work environments, and providing opportunities for professional development and growth

    Older adults and online dating

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