176 research outputs found

    GROWTH MANAGEMENT TOOLS AND PROGRAMS TARGETING SPECIFIC OUTCOMES WITH NON-MARGINAL INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE

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    Communities across the country are struggling to accommodate population growth and economic development while limiting negative impacts of associated land development patterns.. At federal, state and local levels, policies and programs are being implemented in an attempt to mitigate the negative impacts of growth. Many of these programs are united under the concept of Smart Growth. There are numerous resources available that explain and describe applications of tens, if not hundreds, of smart growth tools (for example: see ICMA, 2003). The purpose of this paper is to highlight a few growth management programs that have incorporated tools characterized by fairly significant institutional changes. Of particular interest are the economic incentives and disincentives created by the institutional change. First, sprawl and growth management are defined. Next, the role of federal policy in growth patterns is reviewed briefly. Third, specific examples of growth management policy tools are provided. Finally, several policy issues critical to the achievement of growth management are discussed. Because this paper was initially presented as a general resource for public policy educators, the background material references include an internet site where available.Institutional and Behavioral Economics,

    ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATORY REFORM: DISCUSSION

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    Environmental Economics and Policy,

    ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AS CONSTRAINTS TO AGRICULTURE: A DISCUSSION

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    Environmental Economics and Policy,

    Economic Impacts of Residential Property Abandonment and the Genesee County Land Bank in Flint, Michigan

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    Describes the land bank model, which allows local public authorities to manage and develop tax-foreclosed properties with a focus on returning them to productive use, and summarizes the activities of a successful land bank effort in Flint, Michigan

    VIRGINIA FARMERS' SOIL CONSERVATION DECISIONS: AN APPLICATION OF TOBIT ANALYSIS

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    Using data from a survey of farm operators in two Virginia counties, the authors analyze farmers' soil conservation decisions. Results indicate that financial factors, including income and debt, are the most important influences on the sample farmers' use of conservation practices. Additional factors such as perception of erosion, education level, off-farm employment, and tenancy also influence conservation expenditures. Factors influencing conservation tillage acreage differ from those influencing expenditures for other conservation practices. In particular, age and race of the operator and on-farm erosion potential are significantly related to the use of conservation tillage but not other practices. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for conservation programs.Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    SETTING THE ANIMAL WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICY CONTEXT

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    Livestock Production/Industries,

    ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE

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    Community/Rural/Urban Development, Environmental Economics and Policy, Livestock Production/Industries,

    AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS' WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR REAL-TIME MESOSCALE WEATHER INFORMATION

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    Mesoscale weather networks can provide improved weather information to agricultural producers. This technology can potentially improve production decisions, reduce irrigation and pesticide inputs, and reduce weather-related losses. Developing a mesoscale network to disseminate real-time mesoscale weather information requires a substantial investment. In addition, there are costs associated with maintenance of the system and distribution of the information available. While public funds may be available to support initial development of the system, there may be less public support initial development of the system, there may be less public support for maintaining the system and subsidizing usersÂ’' access to the information. This study uses the contingent valuation technique to determine the willingness of Oklahoma farmers and ranchers, as one set of potential users, to pay for real-time mesoscale weather information. The results indicate that agricultural producers are willing to pay only a modest fee for improved weather information. Gross sales, irrigation, and past weather losses are among the factors shown to significantly impact willingness to pay.Agribusiness,
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