7 research outputs found

    Compassed about with so great a cloud: the witnesses of Scottish episcopal acta before ca 1250

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    This article is the result of examining the witnesses to some 600 episcopal acta. Despite the unequal incidence of survival from one diocese to another and the difficulty of identifying those men who had no surname, it is possible to draw some conclusions from this type of evidence. Some-thing can be said about the bishops' clerks and chaplains, other members of their households and their relatives. There is evidence of considerable continuity of personnel from one episcopate to the next. Promotion, including movement to another diocese, can be traced, as can the arrival, growth in numbers and careers of magistri. Surnames allow a consider-ation of the origins of witnesses. Some light is thrown on the growth of cathedral chapters, the introduction of bishops' officials, the role of the Céli Dé, and on clerical dynasties, illegitimacy and pluralism. The Scottish Church is seen to be integrated into the wider Western Church

    Four Scottish indulgences at Sens

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    English interest in the great Cistercian abbey of Pontigny was stimulated by the exiles there of two archbishops of Canterbury, Thomas Becket and Stephen Langton.1 As archbishops of Canterbury, Langton and Edmund of Abingdon made gifts to Pontigny abbey in consideration of the welcome given to Becket.2 Edmund did not die at Pontigny, but was a confrater of the community, and the abbot claimed the body, asserting that Edmund had expressed a wish to be buried there. The process of canonisation was rapid.3 After Edmund's canonisation, Henry III sent a chasuble and a chalice for the first celebration of the feast, and granted money to maintain four candles round the saint's shrine.4 In 1254, en route from Gascony to meet Louis IX in Chartres and Paris,5 Henry visited Pontigny, as his brother Richard of Cornwall, who seems to have pressed for canonisation, had done in 1247.6 Archbishop Boniface of Canterbury ordered the celebration of the feast to be observed throughout his province.7 Pope Alexander IV granted a dispensation to allow Englishwomen to enter the precinct of Pontigny abbey on the feast of the translation of the relics of St Edmund8 (women were normally forbidden to enter a Cistercian monastery). Matthew Paris, the greatest English chronicler of the age, wrote a life of the saint.9 English interest continued into the fourteenth century. In 1331 an English priest was given a licence to visit the shrine,10 but it seems likely that the Hundred Years’ War made pilgrimage to Pontigny difficult.11 The indulgences preserved by the abbey reveal an interest in the shrine throughout the Western Church, granted as they were by prelates from Tortosa to Livonia and Estonia, and from Messina to Lübeck.1

    Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae Medii Aevi Ad Annum 1638. Revised Edition

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    Eastwood District History and Heritage

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    Apologia for Bishop Jocelin

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    Medieval Glasgow: problems of evidence

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    BENEFACTIONS TO THE MEDIEVAL CATHEDRAL AND SEE OF GLASGOW

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