5 research outputs found

    E-Toronto: Building a Digital Society

    Get PDF
    With the rise of smart city projects around the world, we begin to question “What is a Smart City”? With many smart city initiatives being led by tech giants with corporate agendas, projects often fail to launch. With a focus on big data-driven strategies, these initiatives take on more of a technocratic approach. As a result, these projects often look at citizens as sensors and fail to prioritize the value that people bring to the process of urban development. With data proving to play a key role in the process of decision making, researchers question who has the right to data? And with citizens playing a pivotal role in the process of data collection, how can its value also be shared with those who generate it? Through a speculative and critical design approach, this paper explores the question, “What if the citizens of Toronto could begin to control and engage with their data?” Beyond addressing major issues around data privacy, how could the city encourage data-driven participation under open data initiatives? By imagining E-Toronto, a smart city initiative that is citizen-centric, this thesis explores how data can become public infrastructure to support urban development and create new and more contextual experiences for citizens

    COVID-19 pandemic's environmental and climatic effects in India: A review

    No full text
    The COVID-19 epidemic has had a major impact on human lives as well as the global financial system. The global spread of a novel coronavirus turned into a pandemic, and its impact on humanity is currently the talk of the town. This virus has afflicted every country on the planet, and the nationwide lockdown has had a short-term worldwide environmental impact. The exponential rise in COVID-19 transmission and mortality rates has brought the entire planet to a stop as a result of its devastating implications. The country's social and economic development were severely harmed as a result of the nationwide lockdown. However, it has some good environmental effects, particularly in terms of air quality, since particulate matter (PM), NO2, and CO concentrations in major cities throughout the world are reduced. In India, PM10, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, CO, O3, and NH3 concentrations were reduced by 51.84 percent, 53.11 percent, 52.68 percent, 17.97 percent, 30.35 percent, 0.78 percent, and 12.33 percent, respectively. This research examines the national lockdown's environmental and climatic effects, as well as India's air pollution levels before and after the lockdown.&nbsp

    The journey of tuberculosis control, conceptual changes and implications of the shift from NTP to RNTCP to NTEP: A review

    No full text
    Tuberculosis (TB) has long afflicted communities and nations. People have suffered for generations as a result of tuberculosis, and even today, when newer methods of diagnosing and treating the disease have made it curable, people continue to suffer and dying from it and malnutrition, overcrowding, air pollution, poor living conditions, and other factors that contribute to the TB burden. Financial decentralisation, as well as increased community participation, are required to achieve TB control in India. Furthermore, RNTCP should be effectively integrated with other related programmes i.e., the NACP to address co-infection (TB-HIV) and the National Rural Health Mission. Emerging problems such as childhood tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis should be addressed. Financial decentralisation, as well as increased community participation, are required to achieve TB control in India. Furthermore, RNTCP should be effectively integrated with other related programmes i.e., the NACP to address co-infection (TB-HIV) and the National Rural Health Mission. Emerging problems such as childhood tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis should be addressed

    The Journey of Tuberculosis Control, Conceptual Changes and Implications of the Shift From NTP to RNTCP to NTEP: A Review

    Full text link
    Tuberculosis (TB) has long afflicted communities and nations. People have suffered for generations as a result of tuberculosis, and even today, when newer methods of diagnosing and treating the disease have made it curable, people continue to suffer and dying from it and malnutrition, overcrowding, air pollution, poor living conditions, and other factors that contribute to the TB burden. Financial decentralisation, as well as increased community participation, are required to achieve TB control in India. Furthermore, RNTCP should be effectively integrated with other related programmes i.e., the NACP to address co-infection (TB-HIV) and the National Rural Health Mission. Emerging problems such as childhood tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis should be addressed. Financial decentralisation, as well as increased community participation, are required to achieve TB control in India. Furthermore, RNTCP should be effectively integrated with other related programmes i.e., the NACP to address co-infection (TB-HIV) and the National Rural Health Mission. Emerging problems such as childhood tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis should be addressed

    Evaluation of a quality improvement intervention to reduce anastomotic leak following right colectomy (EAGLE): pragmatic, batched stepped-wedge, cluster-randomized trial in 64 countries

    No full text
    Background Anastomotic leak affects 8 per cent of patients after right colectomy with a 10-fold increased risk of postoperative death. The EAGLE study aimed to develop and test whether an international, standardized quality improvement intervention could reduce anastomotic leaks. Methods The internationally intended protocol, iteratively co-developed by a multistage Delphi process, comprised an online educational module introducing risk stratification, an intraoperative checklist, and harmonized surgical techniques. Clusters (hospital teams) were randomized to one of three arms with varied sequences of intervention/data collection by a derived stepped-wedge batch design (at least 18 hospital teams per batch). Patients were blinded to the study allocation. Low- and middle-income country enrolment was encouraged. The primary outcome (assessed by intention to treat) was anastomotic leak rate, and subgroup analyses by module completion (at least 80 per cent of surgeons, high engagement; less than 50 per cent, low engagement) were preplanned. Results A total 355 hospital teams registered, with 332 from 64 countries (39.2 per cent low and middle income) included in the final analysis. The online modules were completed by half of the surgeons (2143 of 4411). The primary analysis included 3039 of the 3268 patients recruited (206 patients had no anastomosis and 23 were lost to follow-up), with anastomotic leaks arising before and after the intervention in 10.1 and 9.6 per cent respectively (adjusted OR 0.87, 95 per cent c.i. 0.59 to 1.30; P = 0.498). The proportion of surgeons completing the educational modules was an influence: the leak rate decreased from 12.2 per cent (61 of 500) before intervention to 5.1 per cent (24 of 473) after intervention in high-engagement centres (adjusted OR 0.36, 0.20 to 0.64; P < 0.001), but this was not observed in low-engagement hospitals (8.3 per cent (59 of 714) and 13.8 per cent (61 of 443) respectively; adjusted OR 2.09, 1.31 to 3.31). Conclusion Completion of globally available digital training by engaged teams can alter anastomotic leak rates. Registration number: NCT04270721 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)
    corecore