6 research outputs found

    Context Effects as Customer Reaction on Delisting of Brands

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    The delisting of brands is frequently used by retailers to strengthen their negotiating position with the manufacturers and suppliers of their product assortment. However, retailers and manufacturers have to consider the risk of potential reactions when customers are faced with a reduced or modified assortment and thus, different choice. In this paper, two studies are presented which investigate customers` switching behavior if a (sub-)brand is unavailable and key determinants of the resulting behavior are discussed. Various conditions are tested by taking into account context theory. The results reveal that customer responses depend significantly on the context. A real-life quasi-experiment suggests that manufacturers may encounter substantially larger losses than retailers. Managerial implications for both parties can be derived and recommendations for further research are developed.Consumer decisions, delisting, context effects, switching behavior, retailing, logistic regression

    Customer Reactions in Out-of-Stock Situations – Do promotion-induced phantom positions alleviate the similarity substitution hypothesis?

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    Out-of-Stock (OOS) is a prevalent problem customers face at the POS. In this paper, we demonstrate both theoretically and empirically how OOS-induced substitution patterns can be explained and predicted by means of context and phantom theory. We further analyze the relevance of promotions, for which OOS is most pronounced, as essential driver of differences in customers’ OOS reactions. The results of an online experiment demonstrate that customers substitute unavailable items in accordance to a negative similarity effect which is reduced, however, for OOS items on promotion. The empirical findings further suggest that customers’ OOS responses differ for promoted vs. non-promoted items. We find that customers being affected by a stock-out of promotional products significantly more often postpone purchases and tend to avoid substitution resulting in severe losses for the retailer. However, for non-promoted items, customers easily switch to alternative brands. That way, manufacturers lose profit and possibly loyal customers.Out-of-Stock, Context Effects, Phantoms, Promotion, Consumer Decision Making

    Four essays on the context-dependence of consumer preferences in situations of reduced choice

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    Die vorliegende Dissertation untersucht die Kontextabhängigkeit von Konsumentenpräferenzen in Folge eines Marktaustritts in 4 Aufsätzen. Aufsatz 1 diskutiert Auswirkungen einer Auslistung auf Kundenreaktionen. Zwei empirische Studien belegen die Existenz eines negativen Ähnlichkeits-, Attraktions- und Kompromisseffektes und zeigen wesentliche Determinanten einer markentreuen Reaktion auf. Aufsatz 2 bestätigt die Hypothesen über negative Kontexteffekte für Markeneliminierungen in verschiedenen experimentellen Situationen und Produktkategorien. Das sich ergebende Substitutionsverhalten resultiert durchweg in höheren Verlusten für Hersteller als für Händler. Aufsatz 3 diskutiert das Substitutionsverhalten in Out-of-Stock Situationen. Promotion wird hierbei als wesentlicher Einflussfaktor herangezogen. Verschiedene Online-Experimente demonstrieren einen negativen Ähnlichkeitseffekt für die temporäre Nichtverfügbarkeit von Produkten, welcher sich jedoch für preisreduzierte Güter des täglichen Bedarfs verringert. Werden ähnliche Substitute preislich reduziert angeboten, wird der negative Ähnlichkeitseffekt verstärkt. Der Effekt wird hingegen von einem Attraktionseffekt überlagert, wenn unähnliche Alternativen im Sonderangebot sind. Aufsatz 4 untersucht wesentliche Einflussfaktoren eines negativen Attraktionseffektes. In Anlehnung an das von Mishra et al. (1993) entwickelte Kausalmodell zur Neuprodukteinführung, wird ein adaptiertes ganzheitliches Strukturgleichungsmodell für den Marktaustritt getestet. Als wesentliche Treiber des betrachteten Phänomens resultieren die Konstrukte Anteil des Decoys, Präferenzstärke und Informationsrelevanz.This thesis investigates the context-dependence of preferences in consequence of market exits in 4 essays. Essay 1 discusses the effect of brand delisting on customer responses. On the basis of two empirical studies, the existence of a negative similarity, a negative attraction and a negative compromise effect is revealed and key determinants of a brand loyal reaction are analyzed. Essay 2 supports the hypotheses on negative context effects for brand removals across different experimental settings and product categories. The resultant switching patterns collectively lead to bigger damages for manufacturers than for retailers. Essay 3 investigates preference shifts in out-of-stock situations by including promotion as essential driver. A series of online experiments demonstrate that for temporal unavailability of products, substitution behavior correspond to a negative similarity effect which is, however, reduced for stock-outs of low involvement fast moving consumer goods on promotion. While the negative similarity effect is enforced for promotions of similar substitutes, it is ruled out by the simultaneous occurrence of an attraction effect when dissimilar substitutes are offered at a reduced price. Essay 4 studies important antecedent variables of the negative attraction effect. In reference to the causal model on product introduction developed by Mishra et al. (1993), an adapted holistic framework for product exit is tested by using structural equation modeling. The results emphasize decoy share, preference strength and information relevance as major drivers of the considered phenomenon

    Context Effects as Customer Reaction on Delisting of Brands

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    The delisting of brands is frequently used by retailers to strengthen their negotiating position with the manufacturers and suppliers of their product assortment. However, retailers and manufacturers have to consider the risk of potential reactions when customers are faced with a reduced or modified assortment and thus, different choice. In this paper, two studies are presented which investigate customers` switching behavior if a (sub-)brand is unavailable and key determinants of the resulting behavior are discussed. Various conditions are tested by taking into account context theory. The results reveal that customer responses depend significantly on the context. A real-life quasi-experiment suggests that manufacturers may encounter substantially larger losses than retailers. Managerial implications for both parties can be derived and recommendations for further research are developed

    Customer Reactions in Out-of-Stock Situations

    Get PDF
    Out-of-Stock (OOS) is a prevalent problem customers face at the POS. In this paper, we demonstrate both theoretically and empirically how OOS-induced substitution patterns can be explained and predicted by means of context and phantom theory. We further analyze the relevance of promotions, for which OOS is most pronounced, as essential driver of differences in customers’ OOS reactions. The results of an online experiment demonstrate that customers substitute unavailable items in accordance to a negative similarity effect which is reduced, however, for OOS items on promotion. The empirical findings further suggest that customers’ OOS responses differ for promoted vs. non-promoted items. We find that customers being affected by a stock-out of promotional products significantly more often postpone purchases and tend to avoid substitution resulting in severe losses for the retailer. However, for non-promoted items, customers easily switch to alternative brands. That way, manufacturers lose profit and possibly loyal customers

    The impact of context and promotion on consumer responses and preferences in out-of-stock situations

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