97 research outputs found

    A New Approach in Risk Stratification by Coronary CT Angiography.

    Get PDF
    For a decade, coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been used as a promising noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) as well as cardiovascular risks. CCTA can provide more information incorporating the presence, extent, and severity of CAD; coronary plaque burden; and characteristics that highly correlate with those on invasive coronary angiography. Moreover, recent techniques of CCTA allow assessing hemodynamic significance of CAD. CCTA may be potentially used as a substitute for other invasive or noninvasive modalities. This review summarizes risk stratification by anatomical and hemodynamic information of CAD, coronary plaque characteristics, and burden observed on CCTA

    A New Approach in Risk Stratification by Coronary CT Angiography

    Get PDF
    For a decade, coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been used as a promising noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) as well as cardiovascular risks. CCTA can provide more information incorporating the presence, extent, and severity of CAD; coronary plaque burden; and characteristics that highly correlate with those on invasive coronary angiography. Moreover, recent techniques of CCTA allow assessing hemodynamic significance of CAD. CCTA may be potentially used as a substitute for other invasive or noninvasive modalities. This review summarizes risk stratification by anatomical and hemodynamic information of CAD, coronary plaque characteristics, and burden observed on CCTA

    Current but not past smoking increases the risk of cardiac events: insights from coronary computed tomographic angiography

    Get PDF
    Aims We evaluated coronary artery disease (CAD) extent, severity, and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in never, past, and current smokers undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Methods and results We evaluated 9456 patients (57.1 ± 12.3 years, 55.5% male) without known CAD (1588 current smokers; 2183 past smokers who quit ≥3 months before CCTA; and 5685 never smokers). By risk-adjusted Cox proportional-hazards models, we related smoking status to MACE (all-cause death or non-fatal myocardial infarction). We further performed 1:1:1 propensity matching for 1000 in each group evaluate event risk among individuals with similar age, gender, CAD risk factors, and symptom presentation. During a mean follow-up of 2.8 ± 1.9 years, 297 MACE occurred. Compared with never smokers, current and past smokers had greater atherosclerotic burden including extent of plaque defined as segments with any plaque (2.1 ± 2.8 vs. 2.6 ± 3.2 vs. 3.1 ± 3.3, P < 0.0001) and prevalence of obstructive CAD [1-vessel disease (VD): 10.6% vs. 14.9% vs. 15.2%, P < 0.001; 2-VD: 4.4% vs. 6.1% vs. 6.2%, P = 0.001; 3-VD: 3.1% vs. 5.2% vs. 4.3%, P < 0.001]. Compared with never smokers, current smokers experienced higher MACE risk [hazard ratio (HR) 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-2.6, P < 0.001], while past smokers did not (HR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-1.6, P = 0.35). Among matched individuals, current smokers had higher MACE risk (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.2, P < 0.001), while past smokers did not (HR 1.3, 95% CI 0.7-2.4, P = 0.39). Similar findings were observed for risk of all-cause death. Conclusion Among patients without known CAD undergoing CCTA, current and past smokers had increased burden of atherosclerosis compared with never smokers; however, risk of MACE was heightened only in current smoker

    Plaque progression assessed by a novel semi-automated quantitative plaque software on coronary computed tomography angiography between diabetes and non-diabetes patients: A propensity-score matching study

    Full text link
    Background and aimsWe aimed at investigating whether diabetes is associated with progression in coronary plaque components.MethodsWe identified 142 study subjects undergoing serial coronary computed tomography angiography. The resulting propensity score was applied 1:1 to match diabetic patients to non-diabetic patients for clinical risk factors, prior coronary stenting, coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the serial scan interval, resulting in the 71 diabetes and 71 non-diabetes patients. Coronary plaque (total, calcified, non-calcified including fibrous, fibrous-fatty and low attenuation plaque [LAP]) volume normalized by total coronary artery length was measured using semi-automated plaque software and its change overtime between diabetic and non-diabetic patients was evaluated.ResultsThe matching was successful without significant differences between the two groups in all matched variables. The baseline volumes in each plaque also did not differ. During a mean scan interval of 3.4 ± 1.8 years, diabetic patients showed a 2-fold greater progression in normalized total plaque volume (TPV) than non-diabetes patients (52.8 mm3vs. 118.3 mm3, p = 0.005). Multivariable linear regression model revealed that diabetes was associated with normalized TPV progression (β 72.3, 95%CI 24.3-120.3). A similar trend was observed for the non-calcified components, but not calcified plaque (β 3.8, 95%CI -27.0-34.7). Higher baseline CAC score was found to be associated with total, non-calcified and calcified plaque progression. However, baseline non-calcified volume but not CAC score was associated with LAP progression.ConclusionsThe current study among matched patients indicates diabetes is associated with a greater plaque progression. Our results show the need for strict adherence of diabetic patients to the current preventive guidelines

    Energy and indoor environmental performance of typical Egyptian offices : survey, baseline model and uncertainties

    Get PDF
    Egyptian electricity demands have increased in recent years and are projected to grow further with significant economic and social impacts. Recently, mandatory and voluntary building codes based on international standards have been increasingly adopted. The performance of existing Egyptian buildings is not well understood making the impact of these new codes uncertain. This paper aims to provide insights into existing Egyptian building performance, and elaborate a process for developing a representative model to assist in future policy. The work presented is for office buildings but intended to be widely replicable. An energy survey was carried out for 59 Egyptian offices, categorised by building service type, it was observed that energy use increases as building services increase, and existing Egyptian offices use less energy than benchmarks. A more detailed investigation for a case study office was carried out, to inform detailed model calibration. This provided insight into energy use, thermal comfort and environmental conditions, and revealed high variability in behaviours. A calibrated model was created for the case study office, then a baseline model and input parameter sets created to represent generalised performance. Future uses including assessment of the impact of codes are discussed, and further replication potentials highlighted

    Comparing the pooled cohort equations and coronary artery calcium scores in a symptomatic mixed Asian cohort

    Get PDF
    BackgroundThe value of pooled cohort equations (PCE) as a predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) is poorly established among symptomatic patients. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) assessment further improves risk prediction, but non-Western studies are lacking. This study aims to compare PCE and CAC scores within a symptomatic mixed Asian cohort, and to evaluate the incremental value of CAC in predicting MACE, as well as in subgroups based on statin use.MethodsConsecutive patients with stable chest pain who underwent cardiac computed tomography were recruited. Logistic regression was performed to determine the association between risk factors and MACE. Cohort and statin-use subgroup comparisons were done for PCE against Agatston score in predicting MACE.ResultsOf 501 patients included, mean (SD) age was 53.7 (10.8) years, mean follow-up period was 4.64 (0.66) years, 43.5% were female, 48.3% used statins, and 50.0% had no CAC. MI occurred in 8 subjects while 9 subjects underwent revascularization. In the general cohort, age, presence of CAC, and ln(Volume) (OR = 1.05, 7.95, and 1.44, respectively) as well as age and PCE score for the CAC = 0 subgroup (OR = 1.16 and 2.24, respectively), were significantly associated with MACE. None of the risk factors were significantly associated with MACE in the CAC &gt; 0 subgroup. Overall, the PCE, Agatston, and their combination obtained an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.501, 0.662, and 0.661, respectively. Separately, the AUC of PCE, Agatston, and their combination for statin non-users were 0.679, 0.753, and 0.734, while that for statin-users were 0.585, 0.615, and 0.631, respectively. Only the performance of PCE alone was statistically significant (p = 0.025) when compared between statin-users (0.507) and non-users (0.783).ConclusionIn a symptomatic mixed Asian cohort, age, presence of CAC, and ln(Volume) were independently associated with MACE for the overall subgroup, age and PCE score for the CAC = 0 subgroup, and no risk factor for the CAC &gt; 0 subgroup. Whilst the PCE performance deteriorated in statin versus non-statin users, the Agatston score performed consistently in both groups
    corecore