134 research outputs found

    The characteristics of chemical firms registering for ISO 14001 or Responsible Care

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    We use survey data to investigate the determinants of chemical firms' registration for the ISO 14001 standard or the Responsible Care program. We show that most determinants are different for the two systems analyzed: while firm size, previous experience with similar standards, information disclosure requirements and customers'' location are major determinants of ISO 14001 standard registration, regulatory pressure, past environmental problems, and future risks are the main drivers of Responsible Care registration.

    Contracting for Environmental Property Rights: The Case of Vittel

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    Based on an authentic case of contracting for environmental property rights, our paper shows several implications of applying the Coases propositions. The case study adds empirical content to basic transaction costs concepts by analyzing the design and implementation of a contractual arrangement between a pollutee a bottler of mineral water Vittel and several polluting farmers. We analyze the bargaining between land and water rights owners and the bottler Vittel to determine how transaction cost issues (valuation disputes, bi-lateral monopoly conditions, and third-party effects) were overcome and how they succeeded in contracting for environmental property rights. We provide several comparisons of the Vittel case with other similar cases, leading to generalizations and testable propositions for environmental rights negotiations.case study, contracting, environmental property rights, environmental-related transactions, private arrangement, Vittel, Environmental Economics and Policy, H23, K23, Q15, Q25,

    Buy local, pollute less: What drives households to join a community supported farm?

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    This paper examines which factors determine the participation of households in long term contracting with local farmers. Are households motivated by reducing the environmental impacts of their food consumption? A discrete-choice model of community supported agriculture (CSA) participation is applied to a sample of 264 French households. The findings suggest that difficult-to-measure attributes, notably environmental considerations play a major role in explaining CSA participation.community supported agriculture; food supply; transaction cost economics

    THE SCOPE FOR THE STRATEGIC USE OF SCANDALS

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    Scandals are pervasive in many areas of human life. Organizational leaders are human, and sometimes they are involved in scandalous issues that affect the organization. We propose a characterization of scandals that explicitly considers the potential benefits of scandals for transgressors. Even if scandals are frequently considered as undesirable for the targets or transgressors, we develop four rationales by which scandals can be beneficial for the scandal targets. First, scandals can propel the individual and the organization or cause into the limelight and generate a low cost publicity that can serve the interest of the target, e.g., by increasing the visibility and salience of a given issue or getting the right-to-explain what happened with great mass media coverage. Second, scandal targets can decide to serve as altruistic or egoistic scapegoats. Third, scandal targets can use scandals to divert attention from more serious issues. Fourth, scandals can constitute a way to disadvantage competitors or foes who would be more harmed than the initial self-inflicted target. Moreover, for each rationale, we suggest some conditions of its success. Anecdotal evidence and real-world examples are also provided to illustrate and support these rationales

    Les programmes d’écolabellisation face aux motivations Ă©goĂŻstes ou altruistes des consommateurs et Ă  la nature publique ou privĂ©e des attributs environnementaux

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    La rĂ©ussite des Ă©colabels tient dans la combinaison des deux principaux facteurs que constituent, d’un cĂŽtĂ©, les interactions entre la nature privĂ©e ou publique des attributs environnementaux (c’est-Ă -dire le type de bĂ©nĂ©fices individuels ou collectifs qu’ils procurent) et, de l’autre, la part des consommateurs ayant une attitude sociale Ă©goĂŻste ou altruiste. Ce second facteur permet notamment de comprendre pourquoi certains Ă©colabels appliquĂ©s au mĂȘme type de produits et ayant un niveau fixe d’attributs privĂ©s et publics, fonctionnent de maniĂšre diffĂ©rente selon les pays. On montre ainsi que, si le degrĂ© d’altruisme de certains consommateurs est Ă©levĂ©, le comportement d’achat de ces consommateurs altruistes peut empĂȘcher les consommateurs plus « Ă©goĂŻstes » d’accĂ©der au bien Ă©colabellisĂ© et, de ce fait, rĂ©duire le bĂ©nĂ©fice environnemental global recherchĂ©. Il apparaĂźt en outre important d’éviter une politique uniforme en mettant en place des stratĂ©gies de marketing adaptĂ©es Ă  diffĂ©rents segments de consommateurs.

    Letting offenders choose their punishment?

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    Punishment menus allow offenders to choose the punishment to which they will be subjected from a set of options. We present several behaviorally informed rationales for why punishment menus may serve as effective deterrents, notably by causing people to refrain from entering a calculative mindset; reducing their psychological reactance; causing them to reconsider the reputational impacts of punishment; and reducing suspicions about whether the act is enforced for rent-seeking purposes. We argue that punishment menus can outperform the traditional single punishment if these effects can be harnessed properly. Our observations thus constitute a challenge, based on behavioral arguments, to the conventional view that adding (possibly unexercised) punishment options to an existing punishment scheme is unlikely to increase deterrence or welfare. We explain how heterogeneities among individuals can pose problems to designing effective punishment menus and discuss potential solutions. After explaining how punishment menus, if designed and implemented benevolently, can serve socially desirable goals, we caution against their possible misuse by self-interested governments

    Les dĂ©terminants de la conversion a l’agriculture biologique : une revue de la littĂ©rature Ă©conomique

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    On se propose dans ce document de passer en revue les travaux, principalement en Ă©conomie, visant Ă  identifier les dĂ©terminants des conversions des exploitations Ă  l’agriculture biologique. Les documents scientifiques retenus ont Ă©tĂ© alimentĂ©s d’une part par une interrogation des bases de donnĂ©es bibliographiques internationales (Web Of Knowledge, Organic Eprint) Ă  partir de requĂȘtes visant Ă  identifier les articles en sciences sociales, et particuliĂšrement en Ă©conomie, s’intĂ©ressant aux dĂ©terminants des conversions, et d’autre part par un croisement des citations des principaux articles citĂ©s dans la littĂ©rature Ă©conomique rĂ©cente sur l’AB. Sur la centaine de documents Ă©tudiĂ©s, une cinquantaine de rĂ©fĂ©rences ont Ă©tĂ© synthĂ©tisĂ©es et ont servi de matĂ©riaux Ă  une revue critique des effets des diffĂ©rents facteurs, que le lecteur pressĂ© peut retrouver en annexes 1 et 2

    Farmers adoption of integrated crop protection and organic farming: do moral and social incentives matter

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    We use survey data to provide some empirical information about considerations regarding moral and social incentives among a sample of French fruit-growers and vegetable producers(N=243). Our results show that, beyond the strong role played by economic incentives, a significant number of respondents give high importance to moral and social incentives. We also examine how these behaviors matter according to different crop protection strategies, that is, conventional farming, integrated crop protection (IP) and organic farming (OF). Using a multinomial logistic regression, we find that (1) social incentives (e.g., showing to others one’s environmental commitment) drive both IP and OF adoption, (2) moral incentives (e.g., do not feel guilty about one’s choices) increase the probability of organic farming adoption only, and (3) farmers who give high importance to economic considerations (e.g., cutting production costs) are less likely to adopt O

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