1,807 research outputs found

    Fire Blight in Utah: An Annual Management Guide

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    Fire blight is a serious disease of apple and pear trees. Because this disease spreads rapidly and symptoms are not visible until two weeks after infection, it can catch growers off-guard. Having a well-executed and integrated year-round management program can reduce losses from fire blight

    Coordinating IPM Successes in Utah\u27s Crops, Communities and Schools

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    Alien Registration- Murray, Marion (Greenville, Piscataquis County)

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    https://digitalmaine.com/alien_docs/8425/thumbnail.jp

    Greenhouse Biocontrol in Utah: Beneficial Insects and the Pests They Target

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    This guide provides information on biocontrol in Utah and pests that are targeted by beneficial pests, such as aphids, fungus gnats, mealybugs, scales, spider mites, thrips, whiteflies. Symptoms, monitoring, lifecycles, and biocontrol options are included

    What Is Biochar and How Is It Used?

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    Biochar is a charcoal-like product that contains no petroleum. It is made by heating biomass such as herbaceous or woody crop residues, non-salvageable timber, and slash, or animal manure, in a contained system. There are many potential uses for biochar including water treatment, land reclamation, and carbon sequestration. Biochar may also be used as a soil amendment for two purposes – to improve plant health and to store carbon

    Community-wide Grasshopper Control

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    Springtime, while grasshoppers are still nymphs, is the best time for communities or neighborhoods to work together to suppress grasshopper populations. Treating as wide an area as possible is the key to success. When grasshoppers become adults, they can travel great distances and may not remain in one area long enough for an insecticide to be effective

    An investigation of early attention in young children through the use of stroop task variants

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    Stroop interference through the colour-word task has been a popular means of studying selective attention since its introduction in 1935. Little effort has been made to adapting a non-verbal task for use with pre-school children. Cramer (1976) devised a colour-picture task where pictures characteristically associated with a particular colour (such as a picture of a banana and the colour yellow) were presented in incongruous colours (e.g., a blue banana). A series of studies was conducted with children aged between 3 and 8 years of age which investigated facets of this colour-picture task. Two methods of responding were compared - a verbal response, and a manual response that allowed younger children to participate (a card-sorting technique). In addition to the basic colour-picture task where children named colours and forms, another task was introduced where children 'prescribed' the correct colour of incorrectly-coloured pictures (Santostefano, 1978; Sebovà & Árochovà, 1986). Results showed that children consistently displayed increased latencies when colour-naming and colour-sorting characteristically and uncharacteristically-coloured pictures. Interference was frequently found for inappropriately-coloured but not appropriately-coloured pictures in form-naming/sorting tasks. The prescribing task proved difficult for children to complete and produced increased latencies and error rates. Performance of the naming colour-picture task was compared to classic Stroop colour-word procedures in children aged between 5 and 8. There were correlations between colour naming in the colour-picture and colour-word tasks for children aged 5 - 7. Performance in the prescribing task did not correlate. It is concluded that the tasks are good measures of selective attention but not necessarily direct equivalents of the colour-word task. An evaluation of the verbal and non-verbal methods is also given

    Cotton Stockings : Valse

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    https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/mmb-ps/2055/thumbnail.jp

    Sycamore Scale (Stomacoccus platani)

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    Sycamore scale feeds on foliage of London planetree and California sycamore in urbanized areas throughout Utah. The insect is difficult to see with the naked eye, so we rely on the primary symptom of yellow-to-brown leaf spots. If needed, the timing of treatment is at bud break and involves oil application and/or a soil-applied systemic insecticide

    Pear Fruit Sawfly [Hoplocampa brevis]

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    This fact sheet describes Pear Fruit Sawfly, its life cycle, hosts, symptoms of presence, and management options
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