81 research outputs found

    Dose-Dependent Effects of Amino Acids on Clinical Outcomes in Adult Medical Inpatients Receiving Only Parenteral Nutrition: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using a Japanese Medical Claims Database

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    The majority of inpatients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) do not receive adequate amino acid, which may negatively impact clinical outcomes. We investigated the influence of amino acid doses on clinical outcomes in medical adult inpatients fasting >10 days and receiving only PN, using Japanese medical claims database. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality, and the secondary endpoints included deterioration of activities of daily living (ADL), intravenous catheter infection, hospital readmission, hospital length of stay (LOS), and total medical costs. Patients were divided into four groups according to their mean prescribed daily amino acid doses from Days 4 to 10 of fasting: Adequate (>= 0.8 g/kg/day), Moderate (>= 0.6-= 0.4-<0.6 g/kg/day), and Very low (<0.4 g/kg/day). Multivariate logistic or multiple regression analyses were performed with adjustments for patient characteristics (total n = 86,702). The Adequate group was used as the reference in all analyses. For the Moderate, Low, and Very low groups, adjusted ORs (95% CI) of in-hospital mortality were 1.20 (1.14-1.26), 1.43 (1.36-1.51), and 1.72 (1.62-1.82), respectively, and for deterioration of ADL were 1.21 (1.11-1.32), 1.34 (1.22-1.47), and 1.22 (1.09-1.37), respectively. Adjusted regression coefficients (95% CI) of hospital LOS were 1.2 (0.4-2.1), 1.5 (0.6-2.4), and 2.9 (1.8-4.1), respectively. Lower prescribed doses of amino acids were associated with worse clinical outcomes including higher in-hospital mortality

    Clinical impact of lipid injectable emulsion in internal medicine inpatients exclusively receiving parenteral nutrition: a propensity score matching analysis from a Japanese medical claims database

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    Background Although guidelines recommend lipid injectable emulsions (ILEs) be used as a part of parenteral nutrition, many patients in Japan receive lipid-free parenteral nutrition. Furthermore, little is known about the effect of ILEs on clinical outcomes in medical inpatients managed with parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical impact of ILEs on internal medicine inpatients receiving parenteral nutrition. Methods A propensity score matching (PSM) analysis was performed using a medical claims database covering 451 hospitals in Japan. Participants included the following internal medicine inpatients, ages >= 18 years, fasting > 10 days, and receiving exclusively parenteral nutrition, between 2011 and 2020. Participants were divided into 2 groups: those who did and did not receive ILEs. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. The secondary endpoints included intravenous catheter infection, activities of daily living (ADL), hospital length of stay (LOS), and total medical costs. To adjust for energy doses, logistic or multiple regression analyses were performed using energy dose as an additional explanatory variable. Results After PSM, 19,602 matched pairs were formed out of 61,437 patients. The ILE group had significantly lower incidences than the non-ILE group of in-hospital mortality (20.3% vs. 26.9%; odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.72; p < 0.001), deteriorated ADL (10.8% vs. 12.5%; OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79-0.92; p < 0.001), and shorter LOS (regression coefficient, - 0.8; 95% CI, - 1.6-0.0; p = 0.045). After adjusting for energy dose, these ORs or regression coefficients demonstrated the same tendencies and statistical significance. The mean total medical costs were 21,009intheILEgroupand21,009 in the ILE group and 21,402 in the non-ILE group (p = 0.08), and the adjusted regression coefficient for the ILE vs. the non-ILE group was - 860(95860 (95% CI, - 1252 to - $47). Conclusions ILE use was associated with improved clinical outcomes, including lower in-hospital mortality, in internal medicine inpatients receiving parenteral nutrition

    Impact of acute cholecystitis comorbidity on prognosis after surgery for gallbladder cancer: a propensity score analysis

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    Abstract Background Cholecystitis can represent a comorbidity during gallbladder cancer surgery; nonetheless, the prognostic impact of acute cholecystitis comorbidity remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of acute cholecystitis comorbidity on prognosis after gallbladder cancer surgery, with adjustment for background factors using propensity score analysis. Methods A total of 218 patients who underwent gallbladder cancer surgery at our institute between 1986 and 2022 were retrospectively included in the analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of acute cholecystitis at the time of surgery. Background factors were adjusted by including intraoperative bile leakage as a covariate in propensity score calculation. Overall survival and recurrence-free survival were compared between the two groups using one-to-one propensity score matching and inverse probability weighting. Results Of the 218 patients, 37 had coexisting acute cholecystitis. In one-to-one propensity score matching, the overall survival time in the acute cholecystitis group tended to be shorter than that in the non-acute cholecystitis group, although not significantly (hazard ratio, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.96–6.06). Other analyses using inverse probability weighting showed significantly poor overall survival in the acute cholecystitis group. Regarding recurrence-free survival in propensity score matching, the acute cholecystitis group showed a significantly shorter duration than the non-acute cholecystitis group (hazard ratio, 6.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.46–30.6). The inverse probability weighting-adjusted analysis also indicated a significantly higher risk of recurrence in the acute cholecystitis group. Conclusions Acute cholecystitis comorbidity at the time of gallbladder cancer surgery may have a negative impact on gallbladder cancer prognosis

    Surgical outcome of laparoscopic hepatic resection for hepatocellular carcinoma: A matched case–control study with propensity score matching

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    Background: Although the number of reports on laparoscopic hepatic resection (LHR) has increased, studies of long-term outcomes regarding tumor recurrence and patient survival compared to the conventional open approach are limited. We evaluated the long-term survival and feasibility of LHR in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of patients who underwent hepatic resection for primary HCC between August 2000 and December 2013. The patients were divided into the LHR or open hepatic resection (OHR) groups. To control for selection bias in the two groups, propensity score matching was used at a 1:1 ratio based on the following covariates: Child–Pugh grade, tumour size, tumour number and tumour location. Following propensity score matching, thirty patients were included in the LHR group and thirty were included in the OHR group. Results: The respective disease-free survival rates at 1 year, 3 years and 5 years were 78.4%, 61.1% and 38.9%, respectively, for the LHR group, and 89.3%, 57.5% and 47.9%, respectively, for the OHR group (P = 0.89). Also, the overall survival rates at 1 year, 3 years and 5 years were 96.4%, 68.2% and 62.5%, respectively, for the LHR group and 100.0%, 95.8% and 72.3%, respectively, for the OHR group (P = 0.44). Conclusions: According to our study, using propensity score matching, LHR for HCC is safe, feasible and comparative, with good oncologic results

    sj-R-2-smm-10.1177_09622802231215805 - Supplemental material for Factorial survival analysis for treatment effects under dependent censoring

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    Supplemental material, sj-R-2-smm-10.1177_09622802231215805 for Factorial survival analysis for treatment effects under dependent censoring by Takeshi Emura, Marc Ditzhaus, Dennis Dobler and Kenta Murotani in Statistical Methods in Medical Research</p

    sj-R-1-smm-10.1177_09622802231215805 - Supplemental material for Factorial survival analysis for treatment effects under dependent censoring

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    Supplemental material, sj-R-1-smm-10.1177_09622802231215805 for Factorial survival analysis for treatment effects under dependent censoring by Takeshi Emura, Marc Ditzhaus, Dennis Dobler and Kenta Murotani in Statistical Methods in Medical Research</p

    sj-pdf-3-smm-10.1177_09622802231215805 - Supplemental material for Factorial survival analysis for treatment effects under dependent censoring

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    Supplemental material, sj-pdf-3-smm-10.1177_09622802231215805 for Factorial survival analysis for treatment effects under dependent censoring by Takeshi Emura, Marc Ditzhaus, Dennis Dobler and Kenta Murotani in Statistical Methods in Medical Research</p
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