425 research outputs found

    Multiplicity Study of Exoplanet Host Stars

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    We present recent results of our ongoing multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars.Comment: 3 pages, 3 figure

    The multiplicity of exoplanet host stars - New low-mass stellar companions of the exoplanet host stars HD125612 and HD212301

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    Aims: We present new results from our ongoing multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars, carried out with SofI/NTT. We provide the most recent list of confirmed binary and triple star systems that harbor exoplanets. Methods: We use direct imaging to identify wide stellar and substellar companions as co-moving objects to the observed exoplanet host stars, whose masses and spectral types are determined with follow-up photometry and spectroscopy. Results: We found two new co-moving companions of the exoplanet host stars HD125612 and HD212301. HD125612B is a wide M4 dwarf (0.18 Msun) companion of the exoplanet host star HD125612, located about 1.5 arcmin (~4750 AU of projected separation) south-east of its primary. In contrast, HD212301B is a close M3 dwarf (0.35 Msun), which is found about 4.4 arcsec (~230 AU of projected separation) north-west of its primary. Conclusions: The binaries HD125612AB and HD212301AB are new members in the continuously growing list of exoplanet host star systems of which 43 are presently known. Hence, the multiplicity rate of exoplanet host stars is about 17%. Based on observations obtained on La Silla in ESO programs 079.C-0099(A), 080.C-0312(A)Comment: 7 pages, 7 figures, 2 tables, A&A in pres

    STK: A new CCD camera at the University Observatory Jena

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    The Schmidt-Teleskop-Kamera (STK) is a new CCD-imager, which is operated since begin of 2009 at the University Observatory Jena. This article describes the main characteristics of the new camera. The properties of the STK detector, the astrometry and image quality of the STK, as well as its detection limits at the 0.9m telescope of the University Observatory Jena are presented.Comment: AN accepted, 8 pages, 12 figures, 3 table

    The multiplicity of planet host stars - New low-mass companions to planet host stars

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    We present new results from our ongoing multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars, carried out with the infrared camera SofI at ESO-NTT. We have identified new low mass companions to the planet host stars HD101930 and HD65216. HD101930AB is a wide binary systems composed of the planet host star HD101930A and its companion HD101930B which is a M0 to M1 dwarf with a mass of about 0.7Msun separated from the primary by ~73arcsec (2200AU projected separation). HD65216 forms a hierarchical triple system, with a projected separation of 253AU (angular separation of about 7arcsec) between the planet host star HD65216A and its close binary companion HD65216BC, whose two components are separated by only ~0.17arcsec (6AU of projected separation). Two VLT-NACO images separated by 3 years confirm that this system is co-moving to the planet host star. The infrared photometry of HD65216B and C is consistent with a M7 to M8 (0.089Msun), and a L2 to L3 dwarf (0.078Msun), respectively, both close to the sub-stellar limit. An infrared spectrum with VLT-ISAAC of the pair HD65216BC, even though not resolved spatially, confirms this late spectral type. Furthermore, we present H- and K-band ISAAC infrared spectra of HD16141B, the recently detected co-moving companion of the planet host star HD16141A. The infrared spectroscopy as well as the apparent infrared photometry of HD16141B are both fully consistent with a M2 to M3 dwarf located at the distance of the planet host star.Comment: MNRAS accepted, 8 pages, 6 figures, and 1 tabl

    Extrasolar planets in stellar multiple systems

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    Analyzing exoplanets detected by radial velocity or transit observations, we determine the multiplicity of exoplanet host stars in order to study the influence of a stellar companion on the properties of planet candidates. Matching the host stars of exoplanet candidates detected by radial velocity or transit observations with online multiplicity catalogs in addition to a literature search, 57 exoplanet host stars are identified having a stellar companion. The resulting multiplicity rate of at least 12 percent for exoplanet host stars is about four times smaller than the multiplicity of solar like stars in general. The mass and the number of planets in stellar multiple systems depend on the separation between their host star and its nearest stellar companion, e.g. the planetary mass decreases with an increasing stellar separation. We present an updated overview of exoplanet candidates in stellar multiple systems, including 15 new systems (compared to the latest summary from 2009).Comment: 11 pages, 4 figures, appendix with 6 tables, accepted for publication in A&

    HD3651B: the first directly imaged brown dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

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    In the course of our ongoing multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars we detected a faint companion located at ~43arcsec (480AU physical projected separation) north-west of its primary -- the exoplanet host star HD3651 at 11pc. The companion, HD3651B, clearly shares the proper motion of the exoplanet host star in our four images, obtained with ESO/NTT and UKIRT, spanning three years in epoch difference. The magnitude of the companion is H=16.75+-0.16mag, the faintest co-moving companion of an exoplanet host star imaged directly. HD3651B is not detected in the POSS-II B-, R- and I-band images, indicating that this object is fainter than ~20mag in the B- and R-band and fainter than \~19mag in the I-band. With the Hipparcos distance of HD3651 of 11pc, the absolute magnitude of HD3651B is about 16.5mag in the H band. Our H-band photometry and the Baraffe et al. (2003) evolutionary models yield a mass of HD3651B to be 20 to 60MJup for assumed ages between 1 and 10Gyr. The effective temperature ranges between 800 and 900K, consistent with a spectral type of T7 to T8. We conclude that HD3651B is a brown-dwarf companion, the first of its kind directly imaged as a companion of an exoplanet host star, and one of the faintest T dwarfs found in the solar vicinity (within 11pc).Comment: 5 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables, accepted for publication in MNRAS LETTER
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