111 research outputs found

    Implications of Macroeconomic Instability for Agriculture Income and Land Values

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    Agricultural Finance, Land Economics/Use, Q12, Q14, N50, E60,

    Greening Income Support and Supporting Green

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    A multitude of design decisions influence the performance of voluntary conservation programs. This Economic Brief is one of a set of five exploring the implications of decisions policymakers and program managers must make about who is eligible to receive payments, how much can be received, for what action, and the means by which applicants are selected. In particular, this Brief focuses on potential tradeoffs in combining income support and environmental objectives in a single program.Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy,

    DISTRIBUTIONAL ANALYSIS OF U.S. FARM HOUSEHOLD INCOME

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    expenditures, farm safety net, household income, poverty, stochastic dominance, wealth, Consumer/Household Economics,

    AN ANALYSIS OF TAX-DEFERRED RETIREMENT SAVINGS OF FARM HOUSEHOLDS

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    The retiring farmer generally tries to balance the desire to keep the farm intact as a going concern with the need for a secure assets portfolio to finance retirement. This problem becomes more complex in situations where younger family members choose not to be active in the farm business. Tax-deferred savings are potentially an important component of a retirement plan and could represent a very substantial increase in tax-free assets for many individuals. This study examines the tax deferred retirement savings of farm households. The model is estimated using Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) 1999 farm-level national data and the Double-Hurdle estimation method. Results indicate that farm household's source of income, age of the farm operator, marginal tax rate, regional location, and participation in government programs are factors that significantly affect investment in tax-deferred savings.Farm Management,

    FIRM EFFICIENCY AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USE: EVIDENCE FROM U.S. CASH GRAIN FARMS

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    We implement stochastic frontier analysis techniques to show the effects of information technology use on firm efficiency. Results from a sample of 1,865 U.S. cash grain farms reveals that information technology use within the farm business moved farms significantly towards the efficiency frontier. Also moving farms towards the efficiency frontier were the use of written long-term plans, advanced input acquisition strategies, and increased farm labor hours relative to total labor hours. In contrast, an increase in the debt to asset ratio was associated with movements away from the efficiency frontier.Crop Production/Industries,

    Rural Broadband Internet Access Supply and Demand

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    Internet use has grown rapidly over the last 15 years and so has its integration into the rural economy. Connecting to the Internet via high-speed technology such as DSL lines, cable, satellite, and wireless networks increases bandwidth and makes the Internet much more useful to businesses, households, and governments. Rural households are almost as likely as urban households to use the Internet. Broadband Internet access in rural areas has been less prevalent than in much more densely populated areas of the country. Evidence suggests that the difference may lie in the higher cost or less availability of broadband Internet access in rural areas. The paucity of national geographically-specific data, however, presents a challenge in trying to analyze questions of broadband take-up. Data from the June Agricultural Surveys, however, address this. The other difficulty has been obtaining local price in demand analysis. We use ARMS and industry data to develop local broadband service price indices. We use descriptive statistics and binomial logit models in our analysis. The data shows sharp differences in conversion rates across the country, and when also considering the changes over time giving some credence to the common hypothesis that people do choose to use broadband if given the option. Farms were unlikely to make the direct jump from no Internet use to Internet use with broadband access; farms that already had Internet access were more likely to convert to broadband Internet access. Some of the farms that did not convert already had broadband Internet access by 2005, roughly 24 percent of all farms using the Internet in 2005. The preponderance of DSL service for farms indicates both the mostly rural location of most farms as well as Internet users finding satellite a less desirable option. While broadband Internet access availability is necessary for take-up of broadband Internet access, there are other factors that are also limiting broadband Internet use such as price of access, age of user, household income, and educational attainment.broadband Internet access, rural communities, farm communities, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, O33, R0,

    A REGIONAL COMPARISON OF FARM COSTS AND RETURNS AMONG TOP DAIRY PRODUCERS

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    The purpose of this paper is to compare costs and returns of the top dairy producers in the Upper Midwest to those in other major dairy regions of the U.S. The analysis is based on the 1989 Farm Costs and Returns Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The top dairy farmers are defined in several ways, including: (1) highest returns to capital and management, (2) lowest total cash costs, and (3) highest milk marketings per cow.Livestock Production/Industries,
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