416 research outputs found

    Editorial

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    Trivariate Probit Models of Pre-purchase/ Purchase Shopping Channel Choice: Clothing Purchases in Northern California

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    This study analyzes the joint choice of pre-purchase and purchase shopping channels for clothing purchases, using data collected from an internet-based survey of two university towns in Northern California (final Ns=390 and 452). Descriptive analysis clearly shows dependence across these three choices: in particular, the “sticky” combinations of {only-store pre-purchase + store purchase} and {only internet pre-purchase + internet purchase} occur substantially more often than independent choices would predict. We develop two trivariate probit (TVP) models, consisting of two binary choice equations for the pre-purchase channel (respectively measuring the use of store or not, and the use of internet or not) and one binary choice equation for the purchase channel (store or internet). One model allows prior channel purchase experience variables to enter while the other model excludes them. The results further confirm the dependency among pre-purchase and purchase channel choices, with all three error term correlations strongly significant. In addition to breadth and depth of experience variables and channel-specific perceptions (post-purchase satisfaction, cost savings, enjoyment, and convenience), significant explanatory variables include general shopping-related attitudes (pro-exercise, shop enjoyment, and store enjoyment), context variables, and sociodemographic traits (age and income). Prediction of joint choice probabilities was considerably better for the TVP model than for independent binary choice models, confirming the value of simultaneously modeling pre-purchase and purchase channel choice bundle

    Going soft : on how subjective variables explain modal choices for leisure travel

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    Most studies on the link between the built environment and modal choice characterize and model this relationship by objectively measureable characteristics such as density and diversity. Recently, within the debate on residential self-selection, attention has also been paid to the importance of subjective influences such as the individual’s perception of the built environment and his/her residential attitudes and preferences, resulting in models that take account of both the objective and subjective characteristics of the built environment. However, self-selection might occur on other points than residential location as well. Expanding the analysis to also include both objective and subjective characteristics at other model levels (i.e., not only stage of life characteristics but also personal lifestyles; not only car availability but also travel attitudes, not only modal choice but also mode specific attitudes) is the purpose of this paper. To this end, a modal choice model for leisure trips is developed using data on personal lifestyles and attitudes, collected via an Internet survey, and estimated using a path model consisting of a set of simultaneous estimated equations between observed variables. While controlling for subjective lifestyles and attitudes, the effects of the built environment and car availability on modal choice can correctly be determined and thus insights into self-selection mechanisms can be gained. Moreover, we compared the results of a model with and without these subjective influences. The results show that subjective characteristics at various model levels are important decisive factors of modal choices for leisure travel

    Wenn die Telekommunikation den Verkehr so gut ersetzen kann, warum gibt es dann immer mehr Staus?

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    Verkehr einzusparen war immer schon ein Grund für die Entwicklung und Anwendung von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien. Aber warum nehmen Verkehr und Staus beim gegenwärtigen Ausbau dieser ständig verbesserten Technologien weiter zu? Zwölf Gründe für dieses paradoxe Ergebnis werden hier vorgestellt - und vier Gründe, warum eine gewisse Substitution erwartet werden kann.Saving travel has always been a motivation for the creation and use of information and communication technologies. So with the ongoing spread of ever-improving technologies, why do travel and congestion continue to increase? Twelve reasons for this paradoxical result are presented, as well as four reasons why some substitution can be expected
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