34 research outputs found

    Caring for flooded lawns (1994)

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    New March 1994

    Grasses in shade

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    "Trees and shade create a naturally pleasing environment in the landscape, however it is very difficult to grow grass under trees. Shady areas often have less light, tree root competition for nutrients and water, phytotoxic responses from alleopathic tree compounds, compacted soil from heavy use, and excessive organic matter from leaf litter. It's no wonder that growing grass is quite a challenge. Sweet gum, maple and unpruned pin oak are extremely difficult to grow grass under, while locust and poplar plantings are easily grassed."--First page.David D. Minner and Barbara J. Fick (Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture)New 5/90/7

    Barenbrug Seeding Trial

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    Various proprietary seeding mixtures from Barenbrug, USA were examined to determine their effectiveness during both a spring and autumn establishment period under various levels of traffic. RPR perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), SOS annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), and TurfBlue Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) were mixed at various ratios to examine how they performed under traffic stress. Also of interest was to determine if annual ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass could be used as an alternating dominant species

    Seedbanking Potential of Kentucky Bluegrass and Perennial Ryegrass

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    The ability of the cool season turfgrasses, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) to form a seedbank under intense traffic scenarios is not well understood. The practice of establishing a seedbank on athletic fields has been often recommended in popular venues, but has received little attention in academic research. Likewise, anecdotal reporting of seed unexpectedly germinating long after planting are common but have not been scientifically tested

    Caring for flooded lawns

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    "Once the flood waters have receded and the homes are recovered, it will be time to clean up the yard. Grass has been described as Mother Nature's forgiveness for our disruption of the earth. This time, people will hide the scars of Mother Nature with a blanket of grass. Common sense would tell you to pick up any debris, such as wood, glass, stones, nails and other metal objects, deposited on lawn areas. This debris is a safety hazard to operators and can damage power mowers or other equipment used on the lawn. Remove leaves or any other material that smothers grass."--Page 1.Reviewed by Manoj Chhetri (MU Extension Horticulture Field Specialist), Karen Kerkhoff (Area Horticulture Specialist), David D. Minner (State Turfgrass Specialist, Department of Horticulture)

    Seeding Rates versus Various Levels of Simulated Football Traffic

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    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal seeding rates for turfgrass species under various simulated traffic levels

    Low-Input Sustainable Turfgrass: A Regional Cooperative Research Project

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    I rrigation, fertilization, and application of pesticides are needed to maintain healthy turfgrass. Due to dwindling water resources and increased environmental concerns over the use of fertilizers and pesticides on turfgrass, there is an increasing need to minimize the inputs to maintaining them. Most of the turfgrass species that are currently in use require a relatively high level of input to maintain acceptable turf quality; however, efforts to develop turfgrass cultivars with enhanced biotic and abiotic stress tolerance can lead to reduced irrigation and fewer chemical applications. An alternative approach to this problem is to search and find existing grass species that require minimum input yet can maintain acceptable turf quality. Indeed, great genetic variability of drought resistance, nitrogen needs, disease or insect resistance exists among different grass species

    Imprelis 2SL Crabgrass and Broadleaf Weed Efficacy and Seedling Tolerance

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    Previous studies have shown that Imprelis (aminocyclopyrachlor) 2SL has been successfully used in controlling broadleaf weeds in existing stands of turf. The objectives of this study were to evaluate various application rates and application sequences of Imprelis 2SL for control of crabgrass and broadleaf weeds, as well as seedling tolerance, in spring seedings

    Cultural Sensitivity: A Requirement When Developing Food Safety Interventions

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    Extension materials that are sensitive to changing demographics and culture increase relevance and compliance with food safety practices. Produce safety extension materials were developed for U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) produce growers to help with compliance with a new food safety rule. We developed employee training materials based on a needs assessment and behavioral change was evaluated six months after dissemination. The original materials were not seen as culturally appropriate but after modifications, improvements in food safety practices and behavior changes were observed. These results suggest that extension educators should seek feedback from target populations about potential interventions before implementation
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