6 research outputs found

    Fluorine Added to Lead the Way to Future Energetic Materials: 3,5-difluoro-2,4,6-trinitroaniline

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    The efficient design and synthesis of energetic compounds with the highest possible energy and chemical stability has attracted enormous attention due to their high-tech applications. Here we show an energetic compound, 3,5-difluoro-2,4,6-trinitroaniline (8), the relationship between structure and properties is discussed based on the single-crystal diffraction data and several theoretical techniques. It exhibits exceptionally outstanding combination properties, high density (1.861 g cm−3 at 273 K), poor water solubility, high thermal stability (Td = 243°C), superior mechanical sensitivity (IS = 35 J, FS = 360 N), and acceptable detonation properties (VD = 8331 m s−1, P = 31.1 GPa), make it the potential candidate of insensitive high-energy material.</p

    Transcription Factor Response Elements on Tip: A Sensitive Approach for Large-Scale Endogenous Transcription Factor Quantitative Identification

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    The ability to map endogenous transcription factors (TFs) DNA binding activity at the proteome scale will greatly enhance our understanding of various biological processes. Here we report a highly sensitive, rapid, and high-throughput approach, transcription factor response elements on tip-mass spectrometry (TOT-MS), that allows for quantitative measurement of endogenous TFs. A total of 150 TFs from 1 μg of nuclear extracts can be quantified with single shot mass spectrometry detection in 1 h of machine time. Up to 755 TFs, which is comparable to the depth of RNA-seq, were identified by TOT coupled with on-tip small size reverse-phase liquid chromatography. We further demonstrated the capability of TOT-MS by interrogating the dynamic change of TFs in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. This approach should find broad applications in elucidating the TF landscape from limited amounts of biological materials

    Antibiotic resistance of CRKP isolates.

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    BackgroundCarbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) infection is a serious problem in hospitals worldwide. We monitored a tertiary hospital in Changchun, Jilin Province, China, and found that CRKP was the major species among the carbapenem-resistant isolates in sewage. Subsequently, we evaluated the drug susceptibility, resistance genes, virulence genes, outer pore membrane protein-related genes (OmpK35 & OmpK 36), multi-locus sequence typing and replicons, biofilm formation capabilities, and resistance to chlorine-containing disinfectants among KP isolates. Identification of drug sensitivity, multiple resistance profiles were observed including 77 (82.80%) multidrug resistant (MDR), 16 (17.20%) extensive drug resistant (XDR). Some antibiotic resistance genes were detected, the most prevalent carbapenemase gene was blaKPC, and 16 resistance genes were associated with other antibiotics. In addition, 3 (3.23%) CRKP isolates demonstrated loss of OmpK-35 and 2 (2.15%) demonstrated loss of OmpK-36. In the detection of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), 11 ST11 isolates carried virulence genes. The most common replicon type was IncFII. Biofilm-forming capabilities were demonstrated by 68.8% of the isolates, all of which were resistant to chlorine-containing disinfectants. The results of the study showed that antibiotic-resistant isolates, especially CRKP, could resist disinfectants in hospital wastewater, and improper treatment of hospital wastewater may lead to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria and their genes. Thus, these bacteria must be eliminated before being discharged into the municipal sewage system.</div

    Replicon typing in CRKP isolates.

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    BackgroundCarbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) infection is a serious problem in hospitals worldwide. We monitored a tertiary hospital in Changchun, Jilin Province, China, and found that CRKP was the major species among the carbapenem-resistant isolates in sewage. Subsequently, we evaluated the drug susceptibility, resistance genes, virulence genes, outer pore membrane protein-related genes (OmpK35 & OmpK 36), multi-locus sequence typing and replicons, biofilm formation capabilities, and resistance to chlorine-containing disinfectants among KP isolates. Identification of drug sensitivity, multiple resistance profiles were observed including 77 (82.80%) multidrug resistant (MDR), 16 (17.20%) extensive drug resistant (XDR). Some antibiotic resistance genes were detected, the most prevalent carbapenemase gene was blaKPC, and 16 resistance genes were associated with other antibiotics. In addition, 3 (3.23%) CRKP isolates demonstrated loss of OmpK-35 and 2 (2.15%) demonstrated loss of OmpK-36. In the detection of multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), 11 ST11 isolates carried virulence genes. The most common replicon type was IncFII. Biofilm-forming capabilities were demonstrated by 68.8% of the isolates, all of which were resistant to chlorine-containing disinfectants. The results of the study showed that antibiotic-resistant isolates, especially CRKP, could resist disinfectants in hospital wastewater, and improper treatment of hospital wastewater may lead to the spread of drug-resistant bacteria and their genes. Thus, these bacteria must be eliminated before being discharged into the municipal sewage system.</div
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